Nuclear Medicine Market Worth USD 15.8 Million by 2025 | CAGR of 10.1%

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dec 03, 2020 (Heraldkeepers) —
The latest report pertaining to ‘Nuclear Medicine Market’ provides a detailed analysis regarding market size, revenue estimations and growth rate of the industry. In addition, the report illustrates the major obstacles and newest growth strategies adopted by leading manufacturers who are a part of the competitive landscape of this market.

Nuclear Medicine Market is valued at USD 8.12 Million in 2018 and expected to reach USD 15.8 Million by 2025 with CAGR of 10.1% over the forecast period.

Get Sample Copy of This Premium Report https://brandessenceresearch.com/requestSample/PostId/406

**The sample pages of this report is immediately accessible on-demand.**

Top Nuclear Medicine Companies

Nuclear Medicine Market Report covers prominent players are like,

  • Bracco Imaging S.P.A.
  • Cambridge Isotope Laboratories, Inc
  • Cardinal Health, Inc.
  • Covidien, Plc
  • Eczacibasi-Monrol
  • Fujifilm Holdings Corporation
  • GE Healthcare (Subsidiary Of General Electric Company)
  • IBA Group
  • Isotec, Ntp Radioisotopes (Pty), Ltd
  • Siemens Healthcare (Subsidiary Of Siemens AG)
  • Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation
  • Urenco Limited
  • Rotem Industries, Ltd., Inc.

Nuclear Medicine Market report is segmented on the basis of type, procedural volumes, application, end-user and regional & country level. Based upon type, nuclear medicine market is classified as diagnostic nuclear medicine, therapeutic nuclear medicine, research nuclear medicine and other. Based upon procedural volumes, nuclear medicine market is classified into diagnostic procedures, therapeutic procedures and other. Based upon application, nuclear medicine market is classified into oncology, cardiology, neurology, thyroid, lymphoma, endocrinology and other. Based upon end-user, nuclear medicine market is classified into diagnostic centers, hospitals, research centers and other.

Market Analysis of Nuclear Medicine-

Nuclear medicine is involving the application of radioactive substances in the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. Nuclear Medicine images can support the physician in diagnosing of many diseases and conditions such as analyze kidney and spleen function, image blood flow and function of the heart and scan the lungs for respiratory and blood-flow problems. Nuclear medicine uses radioactive materials helps to diagnose and treat a wide variety of diseases and disorders. It provides unique information about the human body and health. Nowadays nuclear medicine is expected to be the most sensitive approach to measure in vivo physiology, biochemistry and metabolism. The future development of nuclear medicine depends on an infrastructure of physics, mathematics and chemical biology.

The regions covered in this Global Nuclear Medicine market report are North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Rest of the World. On the basis of country level, market of Nuclear Medicine is sub divided into U.S., Mexico, Canada, UK, France, Germany, Italy, China, Japan, India, South East Asia, GCC, Africa, etc.

Global Nuclear Medicine market Report covers prominent players are like Bracco Imaging S.P.A., Cambridge Isotope Laboratories, Inc., Cardinal Health, Inc., Covidien, Plc, Eczacibasi-Monrol, Fujifilm Holdings Corporation, GE Healthcare (Subsidiary Of General Electric Company), IBA Group, Isotec, Ntp Radioisotopes (Pty), Ltd., Siemens Healthcare (Subsidiary Of Siemens AG), Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corporation, Urenco Limited, Rotem Industries, Ltd., Inc. and others.

Increasing prevalence of anxiety and diagnosis of various

Read more

School of Medicine review proposes treatments for COVID-related blood clots

Yale News

Scientists at Yale have synthesized research from around the world to suggest new treatment methods for COVID-19.

A multidisciplinary team of Yale physician scientists, researchers, nursing staff and others have collaborated since early on in the pandemic to figure out why COVID-19 patients are so prone to blood-clotting. Their recent review, published on Nov. 19 in Nature Reviews Cardiology, details how COVID-19 causes blood clots in sick patients and why the disease has been so difficult to treat.

“Blood clotting is a complex process that involves many types of cells in the body including platelets and endothelial cells,” John Hwa, professor of medicine at the Yale Cardiovascular Research Center and one of the review’s senior authors, wrote in an email to the News. “It isn’t often that all components involved are in serious disarray and thus synergizing to promote massive blood clotting. In some ways it’s like ‘a perfect storm’ where all the components are perturbed and are tipped over the edge by COVID-19.”

Hwa said his colleague Hyung Chun, co-author of the review and director of Translational Research at the Yale Pulmonary Vascular Disease Program, contacted him in March when he suspected that endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, might be involved in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. 

Alfred Lee, associate professor of Medicine and another author of the review, also reached out to Hwa in March and informed him of potential abnormalities in platelets — cells responsible for blood clotting — that he was observing in COVID-19 patients. The team, which included Lee, Hwa and Chun, expanded those observations into a massive collaborative effort that included many frontline healthcare workers helping with patient treatment.

Platelets and endothelial cells are not usually considered important in the development of a disease from viral infection, according to Hwa. But COVID-19 and the body’s resulting immune response can lead to damage in many different cells and cause a wide range of complications — including those related to platelets and endothelial cells.

“A major adverse outcome of those critically ill with Covid19 is formation of blood clots, many of which are likely undiagnosed,” Chun wrote in an email to the News. “This is likely occurring due to a combination of endothelial injury/activation and platelet activation.”

To make matters worse, the functions of these cells can already be compromised in elderly people and in people with diabetes or other cardiovascular risk factors. Then, when the cells are introduced to COVID-19, the “perfect storm” that Hwa described forms. 

Another complication can come in the form of elevated cytokine levels, according to Jennifer Kwan, co-author of the review and clinical fellow at the Yale School of Medicine.

“The cytokines are essentially our messaging system released by immune cells to ramp up the immune defense or offense against a microbial threat,” Kwan said. “But when

Read more

Celebrity Dentist, Dr. Jay Grossman, Welcomes Dr. Davita Danesh To Concierge Dentistry In Brentwood

(MENAFN – EIN Presswire) https://img.einpresswire.com/large/168611/dr-davita-danesh-of-concierge.png#940×788

Dr. Davita Danesh of Concierge Dentistry

https://img.einpresswire.com/large/147798/dr-jay-gg.jpeg#299×408

Dr. Jay Grossman

“She has extensive experience with cosmetic dentistry, as well as pediatric dentistry.” – Dr. Jay Grossman

LOS ANGELES, CA, US, December 3, 2020 /[To enable links contact MENAFN] EINPresswire.com/ — Winner of the Best of Los Angeles Award – ‘Best Dentist – 2020’ , [To enable links contact MENAFN] Dr. Jay Grossman and his [To enable links contact MENAFN] Concierge Dentistry team are thrilled to welcome Dr. Davita Danesh to their practice in Brentwood, CA. Since 1991, Concierge Dentistry’s mission has been to deliver the finest dental care available. Using state-of-the-art dental technology, their office provides modern imaging capabilities that allow you to clearly see the reasons for procedures and the intended results.

Dr. Danesh, a native Angelino, did her undergraduate training at UCLA, and her dental training at USC. “Dr. Danesh’s extensive experience with cosmetic dentistry, as well as pediatric dentistry will be of incredible benefit to our team and patients”, states Dr. Grossman.

Professor at UCLA College of Dentistry and Professor at NYU College of Dentistry, Dr. Grossman believes in delivering ultra-high-level care with state-of-the-art equipment and techniques. He has helped over 10,000 children and adults enjoy more beautiful smiles and greater self-confidence. He states, “We recognize that patients are individuals with different goals and needs, and we strive to provide a soothing and educational environment where extraordinary results are realized.”

In partnership with Dr. Grossman’s years of experience, Dr. Davita Danesh will surely contribute to the excellence that Concierge Dentistry stands behind, and excel in her new practice. Dr. Grossman expresses his enthusiasm by stating, “We are very excited to welcome her to our practice”.

—————–

Dr. Jay Grossman ([To enable links contact MENAFN] ) has a concierge dental practice in the Brentwood neighborhood of West Los Angeles since 1991 with several specialists offering “continuity of care”, all specialties under one roof. He is a graduate of NYU College of Dentistry as well as a former Lieutenant in the United States Navy Dental Corps. He is a current Professor at UCLA College of Dentistry and Professor at NYU College of Dentistry and a former Professor at Western University College of Dental Medicine. Dr. Grossman is a speaker on the national stage, and the founder of Homeless Not Toothless, an organization that has donated over $5 million in free dental care to over 60,000 homeless Veterans and foster children.

Dr. Jay Grossman and his Concierge Dentistry team’s goal has always been simple: to deliver the finest dental care available. Using state-of-the-art dental technology, they have provided modern imaging capabilities that allow their patients to clearly see the reasons for procedures and the intended results. They recognize that patients are individuals with different goals and needs, and they strive to provide a soothing and educational environment where extraordinary results are realized.

[To enable links contact MENAFN]
Concierge Dentistry
11980 San Vicente Blvd #507
Los Angeles, CA 90049
(310) 820-0123

Aurora DeRose
Boundless

Read more

This Myanmar Doctor Gave Up a Life of Medicine and Is Now a Famous OnlyFans Model

myanmar-doctor-onlyfans-model-nang-mwe-san

Nang Mwe San during a photoshoot. Photo: Aung Naing Soe

“Should I remove the cover-up?” Myanmar model Nang Mwe San asked during a recent shoot to advertise a male enhancement capsule promising bigger penises, harder erections, and a better sex life. 

The pink sarong was wrapped around her waist. She removed it, walked down to the shallow end of a pool, faced the camera, and smiled while posing for photographs.

myanmar-doctor-onlyfans-model-nang-mwe-san

“We’ve had other sexy models for ads … but Nang Mwe San’s name trumps all of them,” Moe Kyaw, the distributor of the pills, told VICE World News. “People are more interested in the products when she’s the one endorsing them.”

Little known outside her country, the 30-year-old trained physician is famous in Myanmar, where her story from doctor working in conflict zones to on-camera performer has been met with fascination, anger, and shock in a country where few women would talk so openly about a life in adult entertainment.

It started about two years ago, when she began posting provocative photos of herself on Facebook, where she now has 1.7 million followers. The photos gained an audience and caught the attention of the medical establishment, which took her license away in 2019, arguing that her images were inappropriate and “not in line with Myanmar culture.”

She found herself in a dilemma. Should she fight to get her license back and fulfill her parents’ wishes of being a doctor, or should she follow her other passion and become a full-time model? She soon resigned from her job working as a medical officer for an NGO.

myanmar-doctor-onlyfans-model-nang-mwe-san

“I enjoyed posting sexy photos on social media. The organization I was working with at that time didn’t like it,” she said.

“Revoking my medical license was a huge push for me to become a full-time model.” 

After shrugging off the public censure she doubled down and signed up to OnlyFans. The subscription-based content platform has made cult celebrities out of sex workers and adult performers around the world. But in conservative Myanmar, the career shift did not go over well. 

“Many criticized me including relatives, friends, and people on social media, but I didn’t really think about them,” Nang Mwe San said. “I do not even check the negative comments under the social media accounts.”

She is right not to. A quick perusal of her page shows sexually abusive comments and insults to her character.

Since her early days as a doctor, however, Nang Mwe San has always had something of an independent streak, wanting to go to places others might shy away from. She was drawn to medical work in conflict zones, and for a time worked for an NGO in Shan, Kachin, and Rakhine States, including in displaced camps for the Rohingya Muslim minority.

“While other fresh graduates were not willing to serve in the countryside and tried to get postings in cities like Yangon, I wanted to go to such places,” she said, adding that her parents were constantly worried about

Read more

Nuclear Medicine/ Radiopharmaceuticals Market 2020 | Industry Trends, Growth Drivers, Competitive Landscape, Regional Analysis 2026

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dec 04, 2020 (The Expresswire) —
The global “Nuclear Medicine/Radiopharmaceuticals Market” size is projected to reach USD 9.67 billion by 2026. According to a report published by Fortune Business Insights, titled “Nuclear Medicine/Radiopharmaceuticals Market Size, Share and Industry Analysis, By Type (Diagnostic Radiopharmaceuticals, Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals), By Application (Neurology, Cardiology, Oncology, and Others), By End User (Hospitals and Clinics, Diagnostic Centres, and Others) and Regional Forecast, 2019-2026,” the market was valued at USD 4.86 billion in 2018. Driven by increasing number of successful clinical trials, the market will exhibit a CAGR of 9.2% from 2019-2026.

Leading Players operating in the Nuclear Medicine/ Radiopharmaceuticals Market are:

Key players are involved in mergers and acquisition to strengthen their market position. Owing to increasing competition frequent innovations are taking place in the market. Some of the companies operating the industry are:

  • Lantheus Medical Imaging, Inc.
  • Cardinal Health
  • Norgine B.V.
  • Curium
  • Advanced Accelerator Applications (Novartis AG)
  • Bracco Diagnostic Inc.
  • Jubilant Life Sciences Limited
  • Bayer AG
  • Eli Lilly and Company
  • GE Healthcare (General Electric Company)

Request a Sample Copy of the Research Report:https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/enquiry/request-sample-pdf/nuclear-medicine-radiopharmaceuticals-market-101812

Radiopharmaceuticals are substances that are used to diagnose specific medical problems or diseases. Increasing imaging capabilities and efficiencies have led to a wide product adoption across the world. Increasing number of successful clinical trials associated with radiopharmaceuticals will fuel the demand for the product. Recent drug application area discoveries have showcased promise for the companies operating in the market. Technological advancements in nuclear imaging and their applications in diagnosis of cancer and other serious diseases have opened up a huge potential for growth. Growing awareness regarding the adverse effects of chronic diseases, and the need for early diagnosis will aid market growth.

The advancements in imaging systems have played a major role in the growth of the market. Companies are putting in increased efforts towards the manufacturing of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. Increasing investments in the research and development (RandD) will create several growth opportunities for market growth. At the same instance, therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can be used for the treatment of critical illnesses such as cancers.

Have Any Query? Ask Our Experts:https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/enquiry/speak-to-analyst/nuclear-medicine-radiopharmaceuticals-market-101812

Detailed Table of Content:

  • Introduction
    • Research Scope
    • Market Segmentation
    • Research Methodology
    • Definitions and Assumptions
  • Executive Summary
  • Market Dynamics
    • Market Drivers
    • Market Restraints
    • Market Opportunities
  • Key Insights
    • Installed Base of PET/PET-CT Scanners For Key Countries, 2015 and 2018
    • Installed Base of Gamma Cameras for Key Countries, 2018
    • PET/PET-CT Procedure Volume for Key Countries, 2018
    • Reimbursement Scenario in Key Countries
    • New Product Launches
    • Key Industry Developments
    • Pipeline Analysis
  • Global Nuclear Medicine/ Radiopharmaceuticals Market Analysis, Insights and Forecast, 2015-2026
    • Key Findings / Summary
    • Market Analysis, Insights and Forecast By Type
      • Diagnostic Radiopharmaceuticals
        • PET Radiopharmaceuticals
          • FDG-PET/18F
          • 68Ga
          • 68Cu
          • 11C
          • Others
        • SPECT Radiopharmaceuticals
          • Technetium-99m
          • Iodine-123
          • Xenon-133
          • Thallium-201
          • Others
        • Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals
      • Market Analysis, Insights and Forecast By Application
        • Neurology
        • Cardiology
        • Oncology
        • Others
      • Market Analysis, Insights and Forecast By End User
        • Hospitals and Clinics
        • Diagnostic Centers
        • Others
      • Market Analysis, Insights and Forecast By Region
        • North
Read more

A network of family medicine clinics serve Toronto’s inner-city community

Dr. Karen Weyman, Chief of St. Michael’s Hospital Department of Family and Community Medicine, says the hospital provides a sense of connection, particularly for people feeling socially isolated or facing challenges. “We take an equity lens to everything we do, so that each person gets the care they need.”

Thomas Bollmann

What started in the basement of St. Michael’s Hospital in downtown Toronto nearly 50 years ago has evolved into a network of family medicine clinics. Today, six clinics, located in diverse neighbourhoods in downtown east Toronto, serve the needs of more than 50,000 patients, of whom 30 per cent are living with low income.

Dr. Karen Weyman is Chief of St. Michael’s Hospital Department of Family and Community Medicine (DFCM), which operates the clinics. She says that each location provides comprehensive care, along with various specialties like addiction medicine, HIV and LGBTQ2S+ health – but all have a guiding principle in common.

“We focus on looking after all our patients, with compassion and respect,” she says. “We take an equity lens to everything we do, so that each person gets the care they need.”

Story continues below advertisement

The clinics’ staff of 250, including 80 family physicians and seven nurse practitioners, do that by taking social determinants, like housing, race and income, into account.

For instance, those who can’t afford it have access to physiotherapy, chiropractic, counselling, dental care and legal services. And for those who are having trouble making ends meet, there are staff, known as income support health promoters, who help them negotiate the system.

The department’s work has been so innovative that it was recognized by the World Health Organization for improving primary-care delivery in Toronto’s inner-city community.

For the last eight months, COVID-19 has had a big impact on how care has been provided, according to Dr. Weyman.

“While COVID has affected everyone, it has had a disproportionate impact on people experiencing disadvantage, not only income-wise, but also those living with mental-health conditions, substance-use disorders and HIV,” she notes. “Patients living on lower incomes must go to work and travel to work, putting them at higher risk. And for families living in small spaces, being able to isolate if they need to is difficult.”

COVID-19 has magnified pre-existing challenges of caring for people living in poverty, those experiencing homelesssness or those who face racism, says Dr. Weyman.

“As a society, we can’t ignore social and structural issues that impact people’s health,” she notes. “For instance, patients who don’t have a phone or internet are having more trouble accessing health care.”

Story continues below advertisement

To bridge the gap, within two weeks of the pandemic being declared, St. Michael’s DFCM created a COVID-19 Social Determinants of Health working group. A number of initiatives were launched, including proactive wellness checks for more than 2,000 patients who were especially vulnerable to the effects of COVID-19, providing food cards, referrals to other forms of support and even buying tablets and phones for patients for telemedicine appointments.

“Our health-care team

Read more

Intermediate embryonic stem cell type could lead to advances in regenerative medicine

A team led by UT Southwestern has derived a new “intermediate” embryonic stem cell type from multiple species that can contribute to chimeras and create precursors to sperm and eggs in a culture dish.

The findings, published online this week in Cell Stem Cell, could lead to a host of advances in basic biology, regenerative medicine, and reproductive technology.

Cells in early embryos have a range of distinct pluripotency programs, all of which endow the cells to create various tissue types in the body, explains study leader Jun Wu, Ph.D., assistant professor of molecular biology.

A wealth of previous research has focused on developing and characterizing “naïve” embryonic stem cells (those about four days post-fertilization in mice) and “primed” epiblast stem cells (about seven days post-fertilization in mice, shortly after the embryo implants into the uterus).

However, says Wu, there’s been little progress in deriving and characterizing pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) that exist between these two stages – largely because researchers have not been able to develop a paradigm for maintaining cells in this intermediate state.

Cells in this state have been thought to possess unique properties: the ability to contribute to intraspecies chimeras (organisms that contain a mix of cells from different individuals of the same species) or interspecies chimeras (organisms that contain a mix of cells from different species) and the ability to differentiate into primordial germ cells in culture, the precursors to sperm and eggs.

For this study, the researchers successfully created intermediate PSCs, which they named “XPSCs” from mice, horses, and humans.

Wu says that these results could eventually lead to an array of advances in both basic and applied research. For example, looking at gene activity in XPSCs from different species and interspecies chimeras could help researchers understand which signatures have been conserved through evolution.

Examining the communication between cells in chimeras may help scientists identify strategies that could be used to accelerate the development of tissues and organs from stem cells used for transplantation.

And using chimera-derived primordial germ cells to create sperm and eggs could aid in preserving endangered animal species and advancing infertility treatments.

These XPSCs have enormous potential. Our study helps open the door to each of these possibilities.”


Jun Wu, PhD, Study Leader and Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology, Virginia Murchison Linthicum Scholar in Medical Research, UT Southwestern Medical Center

Wu notes that developing XPSCs presented a special challenge because the conditions that keep naïve PSCs in a stable state are exactly the opposite of those that stabilize primed PSCs.

While culture conditions for naïve PSCs must activate a WNT cell-signaling pathway and suppress the FGF and TGF-ß pathways, the conditions to maintain primed PSCs must suppress WNT and activate FGF and TGF-ß.

Aiming for the preferred environment for XPSC derivation, Wu and his colleagues placed cells from early mouse embryos into cultures containing chemicals and growth factors that activate all three pathways.

These lab-grown cells were extremely stable in culture and able to multiply

Read more

Precision Medicine Market Size, Share, Trends | Opportunities, Demands and Growth Revenue by 2026 | Brandessence Market Research Report

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Dec 03, 2020 (Heraldkeepers) —
The Precision Medicine Market delivers a succinct analysis on industry size, regional growth and revenue forecasts for the upcoming years. The report further sheds light on significant challenges and latest growth strategies adopted by manufacturers who are a part of the competitive spectrum of this business domain.

Precision Medicine Market: Global Size, Trends, Competitive, Historical & Forecast Analysis, 2020-2025. The growth in the precision medicine market is propelled by an increasing demand for personalized treatment; technological innovation and advancement , as well as growth of personal healthcare devices are major key factor which drives the Global Precision Medicine Market.

Get Sample Copy of This Premium Report https://brandessenceresearch.com/requestSample/PostId/55

**The sample pages of this report is immediately accessible on-demand.**

Top Precision Medicine companies:

key strategies followed by the top players operating in the precision medicine market are,

  • Abbott Laboratories
  • GE Healthcare
  • GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
  • Johnson & Johnson
  • Pfizer
  • Laboratories Corporation of America Holdings
  • Danaher Corporation
  • Biocrates Life Sciences AG
  • Nanostring Technologies
  • Intomics
  • Ferrer Incode
  • Eagle Genomics Ltd

Scope of Market Reports –

Precision medicine is often called as Personalized Medicine. It is used to describe how genetic information about a person’s disease is being used to diagnose or treat their disease. Precision Medicine refers to the modification of medical treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient. It does not exactly mean the manufacturing of drugs or medical devices that are unique to a patient, but the ability to categorize individuals into sub-populations that diverge in their susceptibility to a particular disease. Preventive or therapeutic interventions can then be focused on those who will benefit, sparing cost and side effects for those who will not. The main aim of government regulations is to make Precision Medicines more accepted and it is focused towards genetic diseases related to oncology, skin, respiratory, central nervous system, cardiovascular, and infectious diseases.

The key objective of Cancergenomics is to improve personalized medicine through the DNA sequencing and analysis of patient tumors cells to find out new genetic mutation associated with specific cancers.

Genetic information has helped to increase the development and use of the newest cancer treatments like Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, Targeted Therapy and Precision Medicines. For example, the drug Imatinib was modified to inhibit an altered enzyme produced by a fused version of two genes found in chronic myelogenousleukemia. Another example is the breast cancer drug Trastuzumab which works only for women whose tumors have a particular genetic profile calledHuman Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2(HER-2 positive). It is also found that lung cancer patients whose tumors are positive forEstimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (EGFR)mutations will respond to the drugs Gefitinib and Erlotinib which target this mutation. Conversely, colon cancer patients whose tumors have a mutation in a gene called KRAS (K-RAS) derive less benefit from the drugs Cetuximab and Panitumumab. The genomic information made by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) will boostthe research to develop similar treatment strategies for

Read more

‘Happier to be free:’ Abuse survivor cries for joy after dentist fix broken teeth for free

A Lantana woman had always been strong and independent.

When she finally walked away from her five-year abusive relationship, she noticed she had briefly lost many of her hardworking assets.

The 32-year-old, who wants to be identified as Jane, is rebuilding her life and is using her experience to help others realize they can live a life they’re proud of and deserve.

“I knew his behavior was wrong. I knew the situation was wrong. I was trying to get out of it, but they trap you,” she said. 

ALSO READ: The opioid trap: The search for recovery

The most recent done at the hands of the man Jane thought she knew and loved left her bloodied and bruised, with horrible marks on her face.

“He punched me in the face and knocked me cold to the ground,” she said. “Thankfully, I’ve never seen his face again.”

Jane broke her silence about her abusive relationship while in the hospital that night. Jane says victims don’t deserve to have their world unraveling on the inside, they need to tell someone.

“I felt like I put myself in this position and that I needed to get myself out of it, so I was honestly working to try to get myself out of it,” she said. “You need to ask for help, you need to tell people your situation, you need to accept the help.”

In this season of giving, dentists at Spodak Dental Group in Delray Beach want to turn her tragedy to triumph. For them, that’s helping to boost her self-esteem and sense of self-worth with a restored smile at no cost.



a man and a woman standing in a room


© Provided by WPEC West Palm Beach


“My sincere hope is that her confidence and her strength, sends a message to someone at home who is in an abusive relationship to not take it anymore,” said Dr. Craig Spodak of Spodak Dental Group. “To take care of their family and leave a relationship like that.”

“I have a great view on life. I am so happy right now, I never felt happier to be free. I won’t let this define me in anyway shape or form,” Jane said. “I had no idea of the resources that were out there.”

There are several resources available in Palm Beach County, including Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse, or AVDA, with a team working around the clock to get survivors shelter and transitional housing. Right now, they’re getting between 180 to 200 calls a month, a significant climb.

“We’re finding unfortunately that the violence level, the lethality level of these situations, is very high, guns are involved, multiple children,” said Jennifer Rey, Program Services Director at Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse.

While it’s high, she says rooms are available and safety measures are in place for those who want to reach out and escape.

“We have PPE for everybody. We have a cleaning regime that’s making the place wiped down every 8 hours, so we’re going a lot to make it safe

Read more

Family Medicine Doctors ‘Forgotten on the Front Lines’ of the Pandemic

When you think of frontline health care workers, doctors and nurses in hospitals might come to mind, but independent family doctors are in that category, too.



a sign on a brick building


© Provided by NBC Dallas


“Forgotten on the front lines is what we are,” said. Dr. Guy Culpepper, founder of Bent Tree Family Physicians.

Culpepper says the front lines of the pandemic aren’t in emergency rooms, they’re at his front door.

“When you talk about flattening the curve, that curve flattening happened in my office,” he said.

From the parking lot of his Frisco office, Culpepper says more than 7,000 people have been tested for COVID-19. Nearly 1,200 have tested positive.

“We’ve kept 1,100 of them away from hospitals and emergency rooms,” Culpepper said.

Culpepper says he has about 250 active COVID-19 patients. Those recovering from home are checked on by phone every day. “We get about 1,500 telephone calls a day,” he said.

His numbers tell a story. They also speak to his heart.

“Part of the passion I have in managing my COVID patients and managing all my patients is the feeling of I’m only here because of them,” Culpepper said, emotionally.

Like many independent doctors, Culpepper closed his doors in the spring and furloughed all 75 employees.

On the verge of going out of business, it was a GoFundMe page set up by patients that helped him get through.

“We’re only kept up by those handful who know us and appreciate us because we know all too well that most of the country doesn’t know the work we’re doing,” Culpepper said.

Culpepper, who’s been in family medicine for 33 years, says no federal programs exist to sustain private physicians, like him. Nationwide, he says his profession is in crisis because private practices, “can’t handle the economics of a pandemic.”

He says nearly 10% of primary care practices that temporarily closed this year have yet to reopen.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more