Florida Adds 4,115 Coronavirus Cases; Halloween Safety Tips

ST. PETERSBURG, FL — Florida experienced a statewide uptick of 4,115 coronavirus cases since Tuesday, the Florida Department of Health reported in Wednesday’s numbers.

The Florida Department of Health reported a total of 790,426 positive coronavirus cases; 48,722 hospitalizations; and 16,571 coronavirus Florida resident deaths. Florida saw an increase of 66 deaths since Tuesday’s update.

Hospitalization numbers included by the state are all coronavirus treatments ever done at medical facilities.

The current number of hospitalizations with primary diagnosis of coronavirus is 2,340.

The number of people hospitalized has been increasing in recent days, reported the Tampa Bay Times. Hospitalizations hit their peak in mid-July with just under 10,000 people seeking treatment.

The Florida Department of Health’s current coronavirus report for Pinellas is 25,534 cases; Hillsborough has 47,596 cases; Polk has 22,852 cases; Pasco has 10,781 cases; Sarasota has 9,567 cases; Manatee has 13,175 cases; and Dade has 183,996 cases.

The statewide weekly positivity rate is about 5 percent, according to Johns Hopkins.

Even though Florida is experiencing a high level of positive increases, many communities across Florida will be celebrating Halloween on Saturday traditionally, and the Center for Diseases Control offers recommendations for a safe celebration.

There are several factors that contribute to the risk of getting infected or infecting others with the virus that causes COVID-19 at a holiday celebration, the CDC reported on its website.

According to the CDC, in combination, these factors will create various amounts of risk, so it is important to consider them individually and together:

  • Community levels of COVID-19 – Higher levels of COVID-19 cases and community spread in the gathering location, as well as where attendees are coming from, increase the risk of infection and spread among attendees. Family and friends should consider the number and rate of COVID-19 cases in their community and in the community where they plan to celebrate when considering whether to host or attend a holiday celebration. Information on the number of cases in an area can be found on the area’s health department website.

  • The location of the gathering – Indoor gatherings generally pose more risk than outdoor gatherings. Indoor gatherings with poor ventilation pose more risk than those with good ventilation, such as those with open windows or doors.

  • The duration of the gathering – Gatherings that last longer pose more risk than shorter gatherings.

  • The number of people at the gathering – Gatherings with more people pose more risk than gatherings with fewer people. CDC does not have a limit or recommend a specific number of attendees for gatherings. The size of a holiday gathering should be determined based on the ability to reduce or limit contact between attendees, the risk of spread between attendees, and state, local, territorial, or tribal health and safety laws, rules, and regulations.

  • The locations attendees are traveling from – Gatherings with attendees who are traveling from different places pose a higher risk than gatherings with attendees who live in the same area. Higher levels of COVID-19 cases and community spread in the gathering location, or where attendees are coming from, increase the risk of infection and spread among attendees.

  • The behaviors of attendees prior to the gathering – Gatherings with attendees who are not adhering to social distancing (staying at least 6 feet apart), mask wearing, handwashing, and other prevention behaviors pose more risk than gatherings with attendees who are engaging in these preventative behaviors.

  • The behaviors of attendees during the gathering – Gatherings with more preventive measures in place, such as mask wearing, social distancing, and handwashing, pose less risk than gatherings where fewer or no preventive measures are being implemented.

This article originally appeared on the St. Pete Patch

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