Exercise is medicine, even in the middle of a pandemic

Maimonides (Rambam), the great 12th century Torah scholar and physician, sums up the Jewish attitude toward exercise: “As long as a person exercises and exerts himself…sickness does not befall him and his strength increases…. But one who is idle and does not exercise…even if he eats healthy foods and maintains healthy habits, all his days will be of ailment and his strength will diminish.” The Rambam defined exercise as “vigorous or gentle movement, or a combination of the two, which increases one’s breathing rate.” Interestingly, this is exactly the type of cardiovascular exercise advised by modern medicine – like walking, jogging, dancing, biking, or swimming for 30 minutes at least three times a week.However, social distancing, self-quarantining, and the closure of many gyms have made it harder to exercise. In desperation, many people have turned to walking or jogging outdoors – not permitted in Israel during the first lockdown — while others have found benefit in turning to online workouts. During the first wave, my wife and I did in fact discover a very good online exercise program.Certainly, the physical benefits of exercise are many: increased strength and stamina, fitness, speed and power as well as aesthetic appeal. In addition, over the past 20 years, hundreds of studies have shown that exercise provides numerous emotional benefits such as lowering depression and anxiety and improving overall self-esteem and confidence. In fact, I would argue that regular exercise is a vital coping tool in dealing with the multitude of problems, challenges and stressors that are part of everyday life.Below I list a few of the emotional and physical benefits of exercise.1. When you exercise, your brain produces endorphins (endogenous morphine) that block the feelings of pain and create feelings of euphoria by attaching to receptors on the outer surfaces of brain cells.2. Exercise also increases the production of serotonin and norepinephrine (adrenaline), which is the neurotransmitter in the brain that is associated with all kinds of psychological disorders. Researchers have established that individuals experiencing depression tend to have lower levels of serotonin and adrenaline in their blood. Through exercise, these neurotransmitters are increased and help people to feel less depressed, more optimistic, less worried and more confident.

3. During the COVID-19 pandemic: Exercise boosts the immune system. Research shows that regular, moderate-intensity exercise has immune-boosting benefits that may reduce symptoms of illnesses and disease, ranging from cancer to the common cold. Even arthritis and gastrointestinal disorders are relieved through exercise.4. Exercise allows you to express your frustrations, disappointments, anger, and negative energy in a positive way. Psychologically and physically, exercise gives you more energy and confidence to improve your relationships with family and friends and problem-solve more effectively.5. Exercise increases self-confidence, which positively affects your professional, personal and social lives.6. Exercise shows your kids the importance of being healthy and fit. You’ll be a positive role model. The emotional benefits of exercise can reach your children and beyond.7.

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Lawsuit claims video shows Bishop’s Falls guards assaulting unconscious inmate in dentist’s chair | Canada | News

An inmate at a central Newfoundland prison is filing multiple lawsuits, including against corrections officers and a Gander oral surgeon, following an incident that reportedly happened at the surgeon’s office.

The Telegram has learned the man — an inmate at Bishops Falls Corrections Centre whose name is not being made public yet — alleges he was medically sedated at the oral surgeon’s office last month, when a corrections officer was video-recorded performing a dental procedure on him.

The video is believed to have been taken by another corrections officer, while two dental assistants were in the room at one point of the procedure.

The two corrections officers, who took the inmate to the oral surgeon’s office for an undisclosed procedure, were recently escorted out of the Bishop’s Falls facility by RCMP officers, a source told The Telegram earlier this week.

On Tuesday, both the RCMP and the Justice Department turned down requests for comment.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief. With all due respect to my client. I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.”

However, when contacted by The Telegram Wednesday, St. John’s lawyer Bob Buckingham confirmed he has been retained to represent the inmate and will file the lawsuit “fairly quickly” on his behalf.

“I haven’t heard of this happening in recent times in Newfoundland,” Buckingham said.

He said the lawsuits will claim battery, assault and breach of trust against the corrections officers; professional negligence and a breach of contract against the oral surgeon and the oral surgeon’s office; breach of trust by the corrections services and the provincial government, as well as vicarious liability against the provincial government, as it is alleged to have happened while corrections officers were on duty.

Buckingham said his client was unconscious at the time of the alleged incident, having been medically sedated, and had no knowledge of what happened when he left the dentist’s office a short time later. He said he learned about it and the video later from corrections administration.

“He understands one of the corrections officers took a video of this, which made the rounds within corrections services,” said Buckingham, adding that both the corrections administration and the RCMP are in possession of the video.

Buckingham said he was appalled to hear what the inmate says happened to him.

“My first reaction was shock and disbelief,” he said. “With all due respect to my client, I thought it was incomprehensible and thought maybe he misapprehended what had happened.

“It’s a very difficult set of circumstances to believe, given a professional involving a dentist and corrections officers who were there for his protection, and the inmate being under medically induced sedation.

“But types of egregious breaches of trust do happen in our province,” added Buckingham, who also represents the family of Jonathan Henoche, an inmate who was killed in segregation at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in November 2019, in lawsuits against the corrections officers, the prison and the provincial government.

He said

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Medical groups clash over insurance coverage of herbal medicine


By Lee Hyo-jin

A pilot program rolled out by the government to include several types of herbal medicine in treatments covered by national health insurance was welcomed by practitioners of traditional Korean medicine. It, however, immediately provoked backlash from Western medical doctors.

As the government has plans to expand the coverage for more herbal medicine in the future following the progress of the trial program, the mixed reactions of the two medical groups may deepen into another dispute.

Under the pilot program, which started on Nov. 20, patients at traditional Korean medicine clinics who are prescribed treatments for menstrual pain, facial paralysis, or the aftereffects of cerebrovascular diseases, pay only half of the fee for the herbal medicine, as the rest is covered by state insurance.

The three-year test run is aimed at reducing the financial burden of patients and establishing a verified system to ensure the safety and effectiveness of herbal medicine, according to the Ministry of Health and Welfare.

Around 8,700 clinics providing traditional Korean medicine treatments across the country ― approximately 62 percent of the total ― have agreed to participate in the program.

Why Western medical doctors oppose

The announcement was immediately met with strong backlash from the Korea Medical Association (KMA), the largest Western medical doctors’ group in the country with more than 130,000 members. The association strongly condemned the government’s decision through a press release, calling it a “nationwide clinical trial using unverified medicine.”

They argued that easing public access to traditional Korean medicine and related herbal therapy will pose a risk to people’s health as they claim the safety of the treatments have not been adequately verified and there is no scientific evidence for their efficacy.

The association also pointed out that the program may lead to poor quality of herbal medicine, due to a shortage of certified herbal medication dispensaries and lenient control over them. While most small traditional Korean medicine clinics have own dispensaries, some large ones have outside dispensaries make the medicine.

“There are only five outside herbal medication dispensaries in the country certified by the government. This means that those five facilities will be preparing all the herbal medicines for over 8,700 clinics during the pilot program period,” KMA member Kim Gyo-woong said at a press conference, Nov. 23.

“The mass production system may lead to failure in quality control and safety issues, and considering the current lax control over dispensaries, the system may lead to illicit manufacturing of drugs,” he added.

In addition, the KMA stressed that the health authorities should focus more on the unresolved issues surrounding the side effects of traditional medicine.

More than half of medical disputes reported in relation to traditional medicine treatments were about herbal medicine, followed by Chuna manual therapy, acupuncture, and skin care, the association said, citing recent data from the Korea Consumer Agency.

“The government must immediately retract the policy which only puts public safety at risk, and launch a full investigation on all herbal dispensaries and prohibit the operation

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Philip Sharp: Senior with cancer chooses between medicine and food – Entertainment – Austin American-Statesman

Philip Sharp is battling a case of the sniffles, but, beyond that, he says he’s feeling good.

He’s got his cat of 13 years, Sweetheart. He’s talked to his daughter, Jessica, recently, and the PBS signal is still coming in strong.

You’d never know that days earlier the soft-spoken Sharp had finished his most recent round of chemotherapy treatment.

Sharp is not prone to self-pity or asking for much help. On the day in question, as he stands in his modest apartment talking to me via a Zoom connection facilitated by his case manager with Family Eldercare, Sharp expresses gratitude for the assistance he’s received and the minimal side effects of the treatments for a cancerous lesion recently removed from his bladder. He also is slated to undergo gallbladder removal surgery in the spring.

While his polite demeanor and tender nature serve as no sign for concern, the truth is that recently the 65-year-old, who lives alone with Sweetheart, was dangerously close to having to make this choice: paying for medicine or paying for food.

On lean days like those, Sharp turned to a simple diet of canned beans. You’d be hard-pressed to get him to complain about it. He will talk about food, however. The things he loves. Like a pizza loaded with meat. Tacos. And the Hungry Man meals that Jessica delivered to him recently.

Sharp has lived in Austin since 1998, and while he’s had a long tenure in town, his social circle remains limited. He turns to online chat rooms to make friends with folks his age and talk about their lifestyles, and finds joy in watching PBS shows about American history and science.

“I’m not a real socialite,” Sharp says.

Sharp, who successfully manages schizoaffective disorder through a medication regimen, studied chemistry in college. The jazz flutist also studied music, forestry and computer science but eventually cut short a college education that included stints at Stephen F. Austin University and what is now Texas State University.

“It was all so boring; I couldn’t take it anymore,” Sharp says dryly.

After a period of homelessness following a divorce and car accident, Sharp received assistance from Family Eldercare, the organization that nominated him for Season for Caring, which helped stabilize his living situation.

The nonprofit has assisted Sharp, who lives off of disability benefits, with the stress of managing his finances and staying on top of his medical appointments and mounting bills. For that, Sharp is very grateful.

“It makes me feel very comforted to know somebody is going to be there,” Sharp says.

More Season for Caring.

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Cebu Institute of Medicine ranks 1st among top performing school in physician exam


ALTHOUGH no Cebu-based graduates made it to the top 10 of the November 2020 Physician Licensure Examinations (PLE), the Professional Regulatory Commission (PRC) named a Cebu-based medicine school as the top 1 among the top performing schools this year.

The Cebu Institute of Medicine (CIM) ranked first among the top ten performing schools in the November 2020 PLE after all of its 138 first time-takers have passed the examinations, giving the school a 100 percent passing rate.

The CIM was followed by the University of the Philippines (UP)-Manila with 98.63 percent passing rate and Ateneo School of Medicine and Public Health with 98.60 percent.

The PRC released the results of the November 2020 PLE on Thursday, November 26, 2020 or seven working days after the last day of the examination.

The PRC said a total of 3,538 out of the 4,704 takers passed this year’s PLE administered by the Board of Medicine in the Cities of Manila, Baguio, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Iloilo, Legazpi, Lucena, Tacloban, Tuguegarao and Zamboanga.

A UP-Manila graduate, Jomel Lapides, emerged as the top 1 with a rate of 88.67 percent, followed by Patrick Joseph Mabugat from University of Saint La Salle and Adrian Teves from University of Sto. Tomas (UST) who both garnered 88.58 percent while both Henrick Fong of UST and Raphael Rodolfo of UP-Manila ranked third with a rate of 88.33 percent. (WBS)

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AI-based earlier medicine development leveraging TWCC HPC to aid cancer prediction research

AI-based earlier medicine development leveraging TWCC HPC to aid cancer prediction research

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is shaping the future of global medical industries. The practice of medicine is changing with the development of AI methods of machine learning. As the increasing accuracy of predictive medicine, AI technology, based on analyzing patient’s medical records, is entailing predicting the probability of disease in order to either further diagnosis of disease allowing for the estimation of disease risks or significantly decrease the cost to deal with its impact upon the patient. The AI based prediction medicine is a new type of earlier medicine

Hsuan-Chia Yang, assistant professor of the Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, explains Prediction of Principle Health Threat (PROPHET) project. Led by Dr. Li Yu-Chuan, a pioneer of AI in Medicine and Medical Informatics Research, earlier medicine for fatal diseases is leveraging AI technology and data mining systems to provide a personal, real-time, accurate and manageable healthcare program. The PROPHET project provides the prediction of cancer risks and boosts the new business opportunity of start-ups. Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology provides the funding support for this kind of projects.

Taking breast cancer detection as an example, there are 5 persons confirmed as positive out of every 1000 people screening. Applying the AI earlier medicine perdition method, the effective rate will be reduced to 5 confirmed out of 233 people check. There are 77% saving of breast cancer earlier diagnosis. The saved cost is obvious.

The basic of PROPHET project is making AI Bio-maker model using AI technology to screen cancer and provide the prediction. Transforming the patient medical records to time matrix data diagrams, the skill is setting to predict 10 kinds of cancer risks after one year time frame based on sequential medical records to develop a prediction model. Each prediction of various cancers could reach 85% AUROC (Area under the receiver operating characteristic) curves. Taiwan Healthcare insurance program preserves every citizen’s healthcare digital records of treatments and medicine usage. PROPHET takes this strength to analyze three-year personal data records to predict the cancer risks of next 12-month. These lower cost AI-based cancer predictions allow healthcare professions to participate in the decision about whether or not it is appropriate testing or detection priority for patients.

From the technical point of view, the dynamic prediction value of personal diseases is a time-dependent scenario. The time matrix combined with personal medicine usage records and various diseases could make a two dimensional health diagram. The vertical axis is thousands of variables including medicine usage, set of medical signs and symptoms. The horizontal axis is time listings based on week or month. There are about 250 thousand health diagrams to use in the AI training process to get effective prediction AI models. After requiring repeat fine-tuning in training new AI models of each cancer, it can be derived effective prediction models based on above AI Bio-marker.

However, the huge compute power to perform these AI training tasks requires huge support

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Volunteers in Medicine director to speak to Rotary Club | Ocean City



Volunteers in Medicine director to speak to Rotary Club

Jackie Meiluta




The Rotary Club of Ocean City-Upper Township online program for Thursday, Dec. 3., will be Jackie Meiluta, executive director of Volunteers in Medicine–South Jersey.

Meiluta lives in Sea Isle City and has been associated with VIM for more than 10 years. She also serves on the Finance Council for St. Joseph’s in Sea Isle, is an officer of the Citizen Veteran Advisory Council and is member of the County Homeless Trust Fund Advisory Board.

Prior to moving full-time to Cape May County, Jackie was a senior executive with a Fortune 500 company.

Organized as a 501( c )3 in 2001, ViM operates two free clinics in South Jersey to serve the needs of the uninsured and underserved. ViM’s Cape May County clinic has been in continuous operation since 2002, the Atlantic County clinic opened in March of 2017. More than 500 people consider the ViM clinics their primary care doctor and medical home.

ViM relies on volunteers to provide free medical care to low-income, working residents of South Jersey who do not have health insurance or the means to pay for care. Patients who register with ViM receive free, quality primary care, specialists care when available, and prescription medicine assistance. Perhaps more importantly, ViM becomes their advocate to ensure continuity of care.

ViM operates solely due to the generosity of the medical professionals who volunteer to provide care, and the private donors and funders who help ViM extend care to the underserved in South Jersey.

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Understanding traditional Chinese medicine can help protect species

Demystifying traditional Chinese medicine for conservationists could be the key to better protecting endangered species like pangolins, tigers and rhino, according to University of Queensland-led researchers.

UQ PhD candidate Hubert Cheung said efforts to shift entrenched values and beliefs about Chinese medicine are not achieving conservation gains in the short term.

He said a better understanding of traditional practices was critical for conservationists to form more effective strategies.

“The use of endangered species in traditional Chinese medicine threatens species’ survival and is a challenge for conservationists,” Mr Cheung said.

“Pushing messages of inefficacy, providing various forms of scientific evidence or promoting biomedical alternatives doesn’t seem to be drastically influencing decisions and behaviours.

“And, although many practices and treatments continue to be criticised for lacking scientific support, the World Health Organization approved the inclusion of traditional Chinese medicine in its global compendium of medical practices last year.

“The challenge now is for conservationists to work proactively with practitioners and others in the industry to find sustainable solutions.

“However, most conservation scientists and organisations are unfamiliar with traditional Chinese medicine, which makes it difficult to devise effective and culturally-nuanced interventions.”

The researchers have examined the core theories and practices of traditional Chinese medicine, in a bid to make it more accessible.

They hope their study – and the nuances within – will influence policy and campaigning.

“Today, traditional Chinese medicine is formally integrated into China’s healthcare system, and has been central to China’s response to the ongoing pandemic,” Mr Cheung said.

“In fact, the Chinese government’s COVID-19 clinical guidance has included recommendations for the use of a product containing bear bile, which has raised concerns among conservation groups.”

UQ’s Professor Hugh Possingham said traditional Chinese medicine was now not only entrenched in the social and cultural fabric of Chinese society, but also gaining users elsewhere.

“A better understanding of traditional Chinese medicine will empower conservationists to engage more constructively with stakeholders in this space,” Professor Possingham said.

“We’re hoping that this work can help all parties develop more effective and lasting solutions for species threatened by medicinal use.”

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Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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Which Gyms Are Open on Thanksgiving 2020? Planet Fitness, LA Fitness, Equinox Opening Hours

Some gyms are open on Thanksgiving, which this year falls on November 26. Here we look at the hours of operation at some major gyms across the country, including Crunch Fitness, Gold’s Gym and more.

Planet Fitness

Most Planet Fitness gyms are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Contact your local venue to confirm before visiting.

The fitness chain has implemented several safety measures amid the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, including “requiring all members to wear masks while in-club so you can gym safely and confidently.

“Keep a safe distance by putting an imaginary treadmill, or two, between you and others,” the company noted.

Guests can also see how many people are at their local branch before visiting through the Planet Fitness mobile app. “Just open up the app and tap Crowd Meter to view how many members are there,” the company advises.

LA Fitness

Some LA Fitness locations have yet to resume operations amid the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, while several have reopened. Some LA Fitness gyms have been on a reduced schedule on Thanksgiving in previous years, while some facilities have been closed. Contact your nearest venue to confirm Thanksgiving opening hours before visiting.

Equinox

The hours of operation at Equinox over holidays, such as Thanksgiving, vary by location. Check your local branch to confirm opening and closing times before visiting.

Equinox gyms have also issued new safety guidelines amid the ongoing pandemic.

“Physical distancing of at least 6-to-10 feet, depending on local guidelines, between members and employees is required at all times. Please respect floor markings and any other visual cues that facilitate distancing at the front desk, in our locker rooms, studios, and other club areas.

“Mask requirements vary by local government mandates,” and guests are advised to check their local branch for details before visiting.

Guests are required to make a booking for their gym session before their visit using the Equinox mobile app, while some branches may require a temperature check.

See the Equinox website for more information.

Crunch Fitness

Some branches of Crunch Fitness are operating on reduced hours on Thanksgiving.

Crunch Fitness gyms have introduced several safety measures, including mask requirements for staff “alongside other PPE [personal protective equipment] if required by public health officials.

“We recommend members wear masks within the gym (unless mask wearing is required at all times by public health officials),” the company said.

Social distancing guidelines and enhanced disinfecting equipment have also been implemented, including the “airPHX clean air systems” which “uses atmospheric cold plasma to change a small percentage of the oxygen molecules in the air into a unique spectrum of oxidizing molecules that kill bacteria, viruses, and mold,” the company noted.

See the Crunch Fitness website to see the hours of operation and the specific safety guidelines issued at your nearest branch.

Anytime Fitness

Anytime Fitness gyms are usually open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, including on holidays such as Thanksgiving. Contact your local branch to confirm before visiting.

The fitness

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NCLA Brief Asks DC Circuit to Stop FDA’s Improper Attempt to Regulate the Practice of Medicine

Washington, D.C., Nov. 24, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The New Civil Liberties Alliance, a nonpartisan, nonprofit civil rights group, filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit supporting a challenge to a Final Rule issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Rule bans “electrical stimulation devices” (ESDs) for aversion therapy, currently in use in only one treatment facility in the United States—the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts.

NCLA argues that the statute on which FDA relies does not provide FDA the rulemaking authority it seeks to exercise. Congress adopted the statute to permit FDA to move swiftly to prevent manufacturers from continuing to distribute fraudulent or hazardous medical devices commercially during the time it would take for FDA to prevail in a court proceeding. That rationale is inapplicable when, as here, no manufacturer is seeking to distribute the devices targeted by FDA commercially.

The Center’s professional staff seeks only to continue to use the devices it manufactured many years ago to deter severe self-injurious or aggressive behavior in its own patients. Under those circumstances, the sole enforcement measure available to FDA is a lawsuit seeking an injunction and seizure of the devices—a course of action that would at least have provided Petitioners the hearing rights they were denied in the rulemaking proceeding.

For decades, Massachusetts courts have deemed that the Center’s aversion therapy is both safe and effective for hundreds of patients. Thus, fearing that a federal court would reject its “unreasonable and substantial risk” claim, FDA opted to pursue a rulemaking proceeding. By proceeding in this fashion, for only the third time in its history, FDA was able to prevent the Center from cross-examining FDA’s witnesses and from effectively responding to the assertions FDA made to support its finding.

FDA seeks to prevent the Center from continuing to use its ESDs, but FDA’s rule will allow substantially similar medical devices to continue being used to treat other medical conditions, such as for smoking cessation. NCLA is deeply concerned that FDA has violated the petitioners’ procedural rights and has arrogated to itself powers not delegated to it by Congress. NCLA is asking the court to vacate the rule. 

NCLA released the following statement: 

“Not only is the FDA acting in bad faith, but it’s interfering with the practice of medicine by attempting to dictate how the Center must treat its patients. The law that permits hearing-less bans would violate due process rights—and thus would be simply unconstitutional.”

Rich Samp, Senior Litigation Counsel, NCLA

ABOUT NCLA

NCLA is a nonpartisan, nonprofit civil rights group founded by prominent legal scholar Philip Hamburger to protect constitutional freedoms from violations by the Administrative State. NCLA’s public-interest litigation and other pro bono advocacy strive to tame the unlawful power of state and federal agencies and to foster a new civil liberties movement that will help restore Americans’ fundamental rights.

 

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