Female patient claims Harley Street dentist, 28, ‘used me and got rid of me’

  • Patient A claims she had not pursue the dentist and did not send him messages
  • Dr Sahil Patel is an associate dentist at the Harley Street Smile Clinic in London
  • He took patient to dinner at Savoy after completing her veneer treatment
  • Hearing told the pair then went to hotel and had sex hours after the treatment
  • Patel could face a ban by General Dental Council if his ‘fitness to practise was impaired by misconduct’ 

A female patient claims her Harley Street dentist ‘used me and got rid of me’ when he wined and dined her at the Savoy before having sex with her in her hotel room hours after treating her.

Dr Sahil Patel, 28, twice met up with patient A at a pub after providing her with his mobile phone number.  

He then took the patient out to dinner at the Savoy in London on November 1 last year after completing her veneer treatment. 

They carried on drinking until after midnight, when the dentist said he could not get home ‘as there are no underground trains,’ the General Dental Council heard.

Dr Patel then went to the patient’s hotel room across the street and had sex with her, the tribunal heard.

However the patient denied she had pursued Dr Patel and said she ‘did not send him any messages that were proactive.’  

She said ‘I never once asked that man out or did anything to spur him on. I did not ask him out. 

‘He had lied to me about the train to get into my hotel room. No part of me was leading him on. I did not send him any messages that were proactive.’

Harley Street dentist Dr Sahil Patel, 28, wined and dined a patient at the Savoy then had sex with her in her hotel room hours after treating her, a hearing was told

Asked by Dr Patel’s counsel if she was ‘at least equal in making the running’ for their dates, she replied ‘absolutely not.’

Concluding her evidence of the first day of the hearing, Patient A added:’ My dentist used me and got rid of me.

‘I was shocked. His behaviour was rotten.’    

During the hearing the patient explained she had told the dentist she would be in London in October 2019 and suggested they could meet up.

She said: ‘He said he wanted to take me out’

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The hearing was told that the patient had described emails from the dentist as probing into her life.

She said they had a mutual interest in property development and were both landlords and any meeting was not of a sexual nature but over their shared interests.

Patient A denied that she flirted with the dentist in a series of text messages they swapped.

She also denied that she was flirting by telling him she needed to shower before they met up.

Patient A said that after they met at a pub in west London she understood to have

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Is it safe to visit the dentist?

It has been more than eight months since the coronavirus pandemic forced lockdowns, which means it is past time for most people to get their regular dental exam and cleaning.

The pandemic has created fear about a slate of normal activities, particularly ones that require close contact indoors, like going to the dentist.

But dentists are doing their part to reassure people that it is safe to come to the office.

“The transmission of COVID in the dental office is practically nonexistent,” said Dr. Richard Nagy, president of the California Dental Association on KCBS Radio’s “Ask An Expert” program Wednesday.

That is because dentists are well-versed in infection control policies.

“Ever since the mid-eighties when the HIV scare came, dental offices were the leaders in infection control policies for blood borne pathogens,” explained Dr. Nagy.

He says between state of the art PPE, face masks, face shields and disinfectants, the likelihood of transmission is low.

And if you really feel concerned, talk to your dentist about their safety practices and give them the chance to assuage your worries. Dr. Nagy says while it might feel strange, you could even ask the dentist about their COVID status.

“I think that’s a valid question for the dentist and I think most dentists would be very happy to answer that because again, the answer would be, ‘no I don’t have COVID as well as my staff or my office has not seen COVID patients’.”

And with many more months to go before the majority of Americans have access to a coronavirus vaccine, Dr. Nagy says it is time to stop putting off seeing the dentist.

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New program is launched for safe medicine disposal

The Medication Education & Disposal Project has launched a statewide program to offer free services to dispose of expired, unwanted and unused medicines.

Safe Medication Return is operated by MED-Project, which is the Washington State Department of Health’s approved program operator.

Drug manufacturers fund the program at no cost to taxpayers.

MED-Project provides state residents with year-round medicine drop-off locations such as at pharmacies, medical facilities and law enforcement offices. Along with existing operations in several counties, MED-Project has activated about 150 additional drop-off sites.

Residents who prefer mailing back unwanted medicine for disposal can request free prepaid and preauthorized packages. Information is at med-project.org, or people can call (844) 633-7765.

MED-Project also is launching a public awareness campaign about safe disposal of unwanted medicine. A mobile-friendly website provides drop-off location information and instructions, as well as downloadable educational materials.

“We want to encourage Washington state residents to take their medication as prescribed, store it safely and dispose of unwanted or expired medicine securely,” said Dr. Victoria Travis, MED-Project’s national program director, in a news release.

For more information about the MED-Project drug takeback program and available services in Washington state, including accepted types of medication, call (844) 633-7765 or visit the website.

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College of Human Medicine student receives Diversity in Medicine Scholarship | MSUToday

College of Human Medicine student Michelle Walls is the first recipient of a Diversity in Medicine Scholarship under a program created by Dr. Mehmet Oz to inspire future doctors in underserved communities.

Walls learned she would receive the scholarship during an appearance on “The Dr. Oz Show,” which aired Nov. 25. Due to COVID-19, the second-year student appeared on the program through a virtual link. She was under the impression she was only a finalist for the scholarship until Oz announced she was the actual recipient.

“I was really caught off guard,” she said. “It was a perfect surprise.”


College of Human Medicine student Michelle Wallw

 

It was perfect, not only because it recognizes her many volunteer activities and the obstacles she overcame to become a medical student, but also because the $10,000 scholarship goes a long way toward covering her tuition.

The scholarship is part of a broader campaign called More Black Doctors that Oz, a cardiothoracic surgeon and Columbia University professor, founded to encourage more African Americans to become physicians, particularly in underserved communities. Applicants must be undergraduates or in medical school and show a commitment to serve their communities and tackle health inequities.

After applying and undergoing a series of interviews, Walls clearly met the program’s criteria.

“I was so inspired by your dedication, yet you never give up,” Oz told Walls. “One of the things that inspired me about you is you’ve already been out there trying to pass it along, trying to change each other and how we practice medicine.”

Asked what advice she would give others considering a career in medicine, Walls said, “I would say to them to not give up, because for me, my journey wasn’t straight. It definitely wasn’t easy. I heard a lot of ‘no’s’. So you’ve got to put those ‘no’s’ behind you and find someone who tells you that you still can.”

When she was 6 years old, her father died. Three years later, she and her three younger siblings were placed in Detroit-area foster homes because their mother was unable to care for them. When she turned 18, Walls aged out of her third foster home and was on her own.

Struggling with obesity, she embarked on a healthy diet and exercise program and shed the extra pounds. She then founded a nonprofit, Lifestyle Fitness Empowerment Inc., to encourage others to achieve better health through proper nutrition and exercise.

“I basically felt better about myself, and I wanted to show other people how they could do it,” she said.

 After graduating from MSU, Walls was accepted in the College of Human Medicine. She volunteers at a Lansing homeless shelter and with the Spartan Street Medicine, a program run by the Colleges of Human Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine to serve homeless people in Ingham County.

“A lot of it is just talking to them and helping them with whatever they’re going through,” Walls said.

Part of her mission is to share her own story, hoping it is an inspiration for others who might think medical

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VYPE Class 6A Helmet Stickers powered by Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine: Week 9 (Nov. 19-21)

Welcome to a new VYPE feature for the 2020 football season – VYPE Helmet Stickers powered by Houston Methodist Orthopedics & Sports Medicine! Every week, VYPE will scour the stat sheets of the previous week and find the top performers.


Class 6A teams went into Week 9 and wow there were some amazing performances! See who earned VYPE Helmet Stickers this week. Here are the selections

PREVIOUS HELMET STICKER SELECTIONS

– Week 1 (Sept. 24-27)
– Week 2 (Oct. 1-3)
– Week 3 (Oct. 8-10)
– Week 4 (Oct. 15-17)
– Week 5 (Oct. 22-24)
– Week 6 (Oct. 29-31)
– Week 7 (Nov. 3-5
– Week 8 (Nov. 12-14)

Carter Brown (@CarterABrown) – Pearland Dawson

Let’s lead this thing off with a kicker! In the epic District 23-6A showdown last week at Freedom Field, it went to overtime between Shadow Creek and Pearland Dawson. After a turnover on its first drive of overtime, Pearland Dawson had a chance to win the game. They got in field goal range and called on All-State kicker Carter Brown. He trotted out and nailed a 23-yard game-winning field goal to clinch the District 23-6A Championship for the Eagles and second-ever undefeated regular season. He also went 4 of 4 in extra point attempts in the game as well.

Daelyn Williams (@sirpaydae) – Dekaney 

Dekaney improved to 3-0 in district play after a 52-7 win over Eisenhower last week. The Wildcats’ offense was paced by Daelyn Williams finished 10 of 14 for 184 yards and three touchdowns. It was a nice win for Dekaney.

Charles Garrett (@3way_tank) – Klein Oak

In a tight 21-14 win over Klein last week, Klein Oak running back Charles Garrett had a nice afternoon. Garrett finished the game rushing for 143 yards and a score on 18 carries. Nice game for the junior back for the Panthers.

Colton Marwill (@CMarwill) – Tomball Memorial

It took a thrilling 49-48 overtime victory over Klein Collins to remain perfect but Tomball Memorial was able to do just that. Colton Marwill has returned at QB after being held out a few weeks due to injury. Marwill looks fully healthy again as he finished 20 of 32 for 328 yards and four touchdowns with two interceptions. Marwill also rushed for another 37 yards.

Cy Park Team! 

We are giving a helmet sticker to the ENTIRE Cy Park football team!! That’s what you get when you make history. Last week a 42-29 win over Langham Creek punched the Tigers’ ticket to the 2020 playoffs. It is the first time in program history that Cy Park is heading to the playoffs. Some individual performances did stand out. The Tigers only had five yards passing for the game but then ran the ball for 475 yards. That’s

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Comparison for fitness, weight loss, and more

Biking and running are aerobic exercises that can greatly benefit a person’s health and fitness.

In this article, we compare biking and running for their capacity to burn calories, health benefits, injury risk, and cost.

The number of calories that cycling and running burn depends on several factors, such as speed, terrain, weight, and the person’s metabolism.

People who weigh more will burn more calories during either exercise, while those who weigh less will burn fewer calories.

The following table shows the approximate number of calories a male weighing 154 pounds (70 kilograms) would burn during cycling and running. Speeds are in miles per hour (mph) and kilometers per hour (km/h).

The table below provides an estimate of calories burned during 1 hour of activity for people of different weights. Weight is in pounds (lb) and kilograms (kg).

If a person wants to find out the number of calories they will burn for their specific weight for various activities, they can use a calorie calculator, such as this one.

Additionally, some people may be able to cycle for longer than they can run, which will also affect the number of calories they burn overall.

Cycling uses all the major muscle groups. It uses and builds up the leg muscles in particular, including:

  • quadriceps (rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and vastus intermedius)
  • hamstrings (biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus)

Some of the key muscles involved in running include:

Running and cycling both bring heart health benefits.

Regular cycling reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease and helps:

  • improve lung health
  • stimulate circulation
  • strengthen heart muscles
  • lower resting pulse rate
  • reduce levels of fat in the blood

A large-scale study on 263,450 participants found that cycling to work reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all-cause mortality. The study also found that walking to work lowered the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Another study found that cycling was beneficial for people recovering from stroke and helped improve heart rate recovery after exercise.

Running also helps improve cardiovascular health. A 2019 review found that running reduced the risk of cardiovascular, cancer, and all-cause mortality.

The research suggests any amount of running is more beneficial than no running, and higher doses of running may not significantly improve mortality benefits.

Even small doses of running, such as 5–10 minutes per day at speeds of less than 6 mph (9.7 km/h), can substantially reduce the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

A 2018 study from the journal Circulation looked at the effects of long-distance endurance running on heart health. The study suggests that running a full marathon creates more strain on the heart than shorter distances, such as a half-marathon or 10K run.

A full marathon is 26 miles (about 42 km), a half-marathon is 13 miles (about 21 km), and a 10K is 6.2 miles (10 km).

Scientists need to do further research to investigate the long-term effects of long-distance running on the heart.

Running may be better for long-term bone health than cycling. This is

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Dentist’s Therapy Dog Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job

At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 

Dwight the therapy dog comforts a patient
Jensen McVey

Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”

Therapy dog helps out at dentist's office
Jensen McVey

“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”

Jensen McVey

According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.

Jensen McVey

“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”

Jensen McVey

For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

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The best fitness trackers for kids, tried and tested

Getting your child a fitness tracker is a fun way to encourage keeping active. Children aged 5 to 18 should be getting at least one hour of exercise every day but many don’t, not least because watching TV and playing video games is often more appealing.

If your child is interested in tech and often wants to ‘have a go’ with your fitness tracker, you might consider buying them a gadget of their own.

Like the adult versions, kids’ fitness trackers monitor movement, recording your child’s daily step count and nudging them when they’ve been sitting still for too long. They offer the option to compete against friends in sporty challenges and win digital badges for reaching goals. Many also track sleep quality.

Smaller sizing aside, the key difference is that most children’s fitness trackers don’t track calories, so you won’t need to worry about them developing an unhealthy relationship with food and exercise. They also won’t reveal the location of the wearer.

The data can be synced to a smartphone belonging to either the child or their parent, so that they can see how active they have been that day and monitor their progress.

How we test

We asked three children aged six, seven and eight, to wear each fitness tracker for a week at a time. The testers and their parents were asked to comment on comfort, simplicity of use, accuracy, battery life and any extra features.

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‘Dentist Dog’ Is So Proud When He Does A Good Job



a dog wearing a costume



At a Zanesville, Ohio, dental practice, one member of the staff makes people actually look forward to their appointments. 

A few days a week, a 1-year-old Labradoodle named Dwight goes to work with his mom, a dental hygenist, at Sulens Dental Studio. The mild-tempered pup greets anxious patients and helps take their mind off their fears. 


a dog holding a stuffed animal


© Jensen McVey



Dwight began his training as a therapy dog at 12 weeks old and continues to practice with trainers twice a week at his puppy school and the dental office. But from the moment his mom brought him home, she knew he’d be perfect for the job.

“Dwight was definitely born to be a therapy dog,” Jensen McVey, Dwight’s trainer, told The Dodo. “He is extremely sweet and has never met a stranger!”




© Jensen McVey



“Dwight can definitely get excited and play when the time calls for it but otherwise he is a calm cuddle bug,” he added. “Dwight is so much fun to work with and every one of my employees loves working with him and loves seeing him come in.”


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



According to one study, as many as 36 percent of people suffer from dental fear. But Dwight is doing everything he can to help change people’s perception of sitting in the dentist’s chair. Therapy dogs can positively change people’s mood and anxiety — even reducing their perception of pain.

Dwight’s job starts as soon as the patient walks in. He runs to greet them at the door with a big smile and a wagging tail. If the patient needs a little extra help, Dwight is happy to comfort them during their cleaning or procedure.


a person holding a dog


© Jensen McVey



“He helps to create a fun experience for scared children coming in and provides overall comfort for those in the office,” McVey said. “He is also trained to gently lay and apply pressure for nervous patients or to gently place his paws up so people can pet him and take their mind off of being at the dentist.”


a dog sitting on a table


© Jensen McVey



For all his hard work, Dwight gets paid in treats and a monthly BarkBox. But the pup is happiest when he can spend time with his dental family — helping people feel a little bit better every day.

Continue Reading

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House panel OKs ‘medicine stockpiling’ bill



calendar: House panel OKs ‘medicine stockpiling’ bill


© Manjunath Kiran/AFP
House panel OKs ‘medicine stockpiling’ bill

MANILA, Philippines — A House panel yesterday approved a bill seeking the stockpiling of medicines for public health emergencies like the current coronavirus pandemic.

The committee on health chaired by Quezon Rep. Helen Tan has approved the substitute to the proposed “Health Procurement and Stockpiling Act,” which seeks to ensure supply of critical drugs, vaccines, devices and materials in times of public health emergencies.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has shown the need to preposition critical and strategic pharmaceuticals and medical devices as well as the supply of raw materials. The country needs to be proactive in its response to public health emergencies,” explained Tan, principal author of the bill.

The bill proposes the creation of the Health Procurement and Stockpiling Bureau under the Department of Health, which will absorb the existing Procurement Service and the Supply Chain Management Service and serve as the principal agency mandated to undertake a transparent, fair, proactive and innovative procurement service for the DOH.

The new bureau will be tasked to stockpile, conserve and facilitate the release of adequate amounts of potentially lifesaving pharmaceuticals, vaccines, devices and materials in times of public health emergencies.

It will also be mandated to identify strategic and critical drugs and medicines, vaccines, devices and materials needed for public health emergencies that have the distinct capability of being stockpiled in strategic and secure areas of the country; supplement drugs and medicines, vaccines, devices and materials to state supplies acting as a stopgap buffer when the immediate supply of adequate amounts of drugs and medicines, vaccines, devices and materials may not be immediately available; and ensure the rotation, replenishment and freshness of stocks and that there exists at all times steady, available and adequate supplies in responding to public health emergencies.

The proposed DOH bureau will also lead in facilitating the creation of a conducive environment to encourage pharmaceutical and device self-sufficiency for medical supplies needed by the country and spearhead the crafting of a multi-sector National Drug and Device Security Program geared towards the country’s self-reliance in producing drugs and medicines, vaccines, devices and materials.

Tan pointed out that based on the Joint External Evaluation Mission report, the Philippines, due to its location, is one of the most natural-disaster prone countries in the world and in the past decade the country has faced challenges in making solid progress in infectious disease control.

“Given this situation, the country’s preparedness in times of public health emergencies is significantly necessary such as during pandemics and natural disasters,” the lawmaker stressed.?

In proposing the measure, Tan lamented how COVID-19 caught the country and the world flatfooted as it affected the global and local production and distribution of pharmaceuticals and medical devices as well as the supply of raw materials.

She recalled how some countries even imposed limits on export of medicines and medical supplies/equipment such as face masks, shields and ventilators to mitigate critical shortages in their countries likewise aggravated the situation.

The lawmaker cited, for

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