U.S. adds 81K COVID-19 cases; more than 260K sickened over last 3 days

Nov. 2 (UPI) — The United States has added more than a quarter-million new COVID-19 cases over the last three days — by far the largest national three-day tally of the pandemic. About 2,300 patients died.

According to updated data from Johns Hopkins University, 81,500 cases were reported Sunday — the most ever recorded for a Sunday, when figures are typically lower because of slower reporting over the weekend.

The United States obliterated its single-day record on Friday with almost 100,000 new cases. The three-day total ending Sunday was about 262,000. The five-day total is about 430,000 and the seven-day total close to 570,000.

There were also about 450 new deaths on Sunday, according to Johns Hopkins. More than 6,000 patients have died of the virus in the United States over the past week.

Since the start of the pandemic, there have been 9.21 million cases and 231,000 deaths nationwide.

With the disease surging in the Midwest, hospitalizations nationwide are close to 50,000, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

In Iowa, state health officials have seen seven straight days of increases of seriously ill patients. The state has averaged more than 2,000 new cases per day, a record high.

In Wisconsin, officials say a record number of patients are receiving hospital care, with about a fifth of them in intensive care. Several patients are being treated at a newly created field hospital at the Wisconsin State Fair Park.

The state saw a record number of new cases over the weekend. Wisconsin’s positivity rate is about 19%.

Source Article

Read more

Health care: Trump takes last swipe at Affordable Care Act before Election Day

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on Sunday gave the state permission to stop using the federal exchange, Healthcare.gov, for enrollment in the individual market and shift to a private sector Georgia Access Model, starting in 2023.

State officials argue that the move will give residents access to a broader array of options from web brokers, health insurance companies and agents — which will have a greater incentive to enroll consumers in coverage. They estimate the waiver will lower premiums and increase enrollment by 25,000 people.

Advocates, however, fear that it could shift healthier people to less comprehensive, non-Obamacare plans and leave those with pre-existing conditions facing higher premiums for Affordable Care Act policies. Plus, consumers could unknowingly sign up for skimpier policies.

“Consumer could end up in insurance plans that don’t cover everything they think it would cover,” said Tara Straw, senior policy analyst at the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Share your story: How have you been helped or hurt by Obamacare?

What’s more, the Georgia waiver would eliminate residents’ ability to go to a single website to see all their options. Instead, they would have to navigate a fragmented system of broker and insurers — similar to what existed prior to the landmark health reform law, Straw said. This would likely decrease coverage and raise premiums.

The waiver does not meet the federal requirements for approval, including covering as many people with the same affordable and comprehensive coverage as without the waiver, Straw said. This will open up the approval to legal challenges.

The agency opened the door for states to create alternatives to Obamacare in 2018. The Peach State, which has the nation’s third highest uninsured rate at 13.4%, is the first to seek this enhanced power to reshape its individual market.

About 433,000 Georgians were enrolled in Obamacare exchange plans, as of February, according to federal data.

The approval came on the same day as open enrollment for 2021 began and 10 days before the Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments in a case that could bring down the law.

The Trump administration is backing a coalition of Republican-led attorneys general, including Georgia’s, who argue that Obamacare’s individual mandate was rendered unconstitutional after Congress reduced the penalty for not having insurance to zero as part of the 2017 tax cut law. As a result, the entire health reform law must fall, they argue.

Health care has taken center stage in the 2020 presidential campaign. Former Vice President Joe Biden’s campaign has hammered President Donald Trump for trying to take down the law and its protections for those with pre-existing conditions. Trump has repeatedly said he has a replacement plan that would continue those safeguards but has yet to produce one.
The administration has pursued multiple avenues to overturn the Affordable Care Act in its first term. After efforts to repeal the law in Congress failed in 2017, officials started undermining it from within, including shortening the annual enrollment period to
Read more

What you need to know about the dialysis measure

Starting kidney dialysis too soon can be risky.
A patient receives kidney dialysis. California’s Proposition 23 would implement new rules for dialysis clinics. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Proposition 23 would require dialysis clinics across California to employ at least one doctor who is on-site whenever patients are receiving treatment.

Here is a rundown of the ballot measure:

The measure

The dialysis industry and the healthcare union have been locked in a years-long fight, which resulted in SEIU-UHW pushing Proposition 8 in 2018. That failed measure would have required businesses with revenues exceeding 115% of specified costs related to patient care to provide rebates to insurers and pay a penalty to the state.

This year’s measure would require dialysis clinics to employ a doctor who is on-site when patients are receiving treatment, increase reporting requirements for dialysis infections, require clinics to obtain approval from the state’s public health department before closing or substantially reducing services, and bar clinics from refusing access to a patient based on their insurance.

Dialysis is a life-saving treatment for people suffering from kidney failure where machines remove a patient’s blood and filter it to remove waste and excess fluids before returning the blood to their body. There are roughly 600 dialysis clinics in California, with nearly three-quarters of the clinics owned or operated by two companies — DaVita Inc. and Fresenius Medical Care.

Pro arguments

Backers of Proposition 23, the Service Employees International Union-United Healthcare Workers West, say the dialysis industry favors profits over patient care by not having a doctor available in the event of complications or an emergency.

The union says its efforts to push for more oversight and higher quality care have been met with fierce — and heavily funded — campaigns aimed at protecting profits of the $3-billion industry in California.

Supporters say that dialysis centers provide critical life-saving treatment and that clinics should therefore be required, like hospitals, to receive approval from the state before reducing services or closing.

Anti arguments

Opponents say the measure is unnecessary and that the added cost would lead to dialysis clinics closing, which would put patients at even greater risk. This year, opponents have so far raised $105.2 million to fight Proposition 23, according to a Times analysis of campaign contributions. Of that amount, DaVita has contributed $66.8 million.

Opponents argue that there are already sufficient medical staff at clinics and that reporting requirements in the measure are superfluous since clinics are currently required to report dialysis-infection-related information to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Opponents argue SEIU-UHW has been weaponizing the ballot measure process to force the dialysis industry to spend heavily to defend itself when the union’s real interest is getting workers in clinics to unionize.

Reading list

California voters will again consider new dialysis center regulations with Prop. 23

Times columnist George Skelton assesses Prop. 23

More than $100 million spent on 2018 battle over dialysis industry profits in California

Hospitals and union make deal to avoid ballot measure fight

A look at California’s

Read more

Researchers find new deadly inflammatory disease, NIH says

National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers reported a newly discovered deadly inflammatory disorder last week.

“We had many patients with undiagnosed inflammatory conditions who were coming to the NIH Clinical Center, and we were just unable to diagnose them,” Dr. David Beck, a clinical fellow at NHGRI and lead author of the paper, said in a news release. “That’s when we had the idea of doing it the opposite way. Instead of starting with symptoms, start with a list of genes. Then, study the genomes of undiagnosed individuals and see where it takes us.”

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

The team examined over 2,500 people with undiagnosed inflammatory diseases and assessed over 800 genes involved in cells’ regulatory processes, per the release.

In doing this, they found one mutated gene, UB1, causing the syndrome dubbed VEXAS for “vacuoles, E1 enzyme, X-linked, autoinflammatory and somatic syndrome.”

Nearly half the patients under study died from the serious condition, researchers said. (iStock)

Nearly half the patients under study died from the serious condition, researchers said. (iStock)

“So far, 40% of VEXAS patients who the team studied have died, revealing the devastating consequences of the severe condition,” per the release. The disease involves blood clotting, repeated fevers, heart issues and problems with blood cells, called myeloid cells.

Findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

FDA WARNS AGAINST DIY CORONAVIRUS TREATMENT USING OXYGEN CONCENTRATOR

“Our objective was to see if any of the 2,560 patients shared variations in the same gene,” Dr. Daniel Kastner, scientific director of the Intramural Research Program at NHGRI and a senior author of the paper, said in a news release. “Instead of looking at clinical similarities, we were instead taking advantage of shared genomic similarities that could help us discover a completely new disease.”

Of the 2,560 patients, researchers said 1,000 had repeated fevers and widespread inflammation. Three men had the mutated gene in the X chromosome; men have one X chromosome and one Y chromosome, while women have two X chromosomes.

Researchers found “mosaicism” among the affected patients, which happens when some cells carry the gene in its mutated form, and other cells carry the gene in its normal form, per the release. Ultimately, 25 total men across other NIH databases showed to have the mutated gene with similar symptoms: blood clotting, repeated fevers and heart issues, among others.

“By using this genome-first approach, we have managed to find a thread that ties together patients carrying all of these seemingly unrelated, disparate diagnoses,” Kastner concluded.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Source Article

Read more

Kentwood dentist office to offer free dental services to veterans

For the 4th consecutive year, Partners in Dental Care is offering free dental care to Veterans who served and are currently serving our country.

KENTWOOD, Mich. — With Veterans Day approaching, a Grand Rapids dentist office is once again offering free service to veterans.

Partners in Dental Care in Kentwood is hosting it’s “Serving Those Who Served” event on Friday, Nov. 6.

“It’s been a popular event and that’s why we bring it back every year,” said Dianne Groendyk, Treatment Coordinator at Partners in Dental Care. “Just like past years, it’ll be first come, first serve.”

This year’s event will take place from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The dental services that will be offered free of charge include cleanings, fillings and extractions.

There will also be a registered nurse available on site for medical screenings and to answer any health-related questions veterans may have.

“We ask that veterans come to the office and pre-register on the 6th,” added Groendyk. “They can let us know at registration whether they want to see a doctor or a hygienist for a cleaning. We will take them in cue as far as order of which they came.”

Everybody will be required to wear a mask and to socially distance while waiting.

“If we are at full capacity, we will ask people to wait in their car and then we’ll call them on their phone to let them know when we’re ready to see them,” said Groendyk.

This is the fourth consecutive year Partners in Dental care has honored area veterans with this event.

“Our Veterans have sacrificed a lot,” said Groendyk. “Dental hygiene is important to healthy living, so this is our way to give something back to them.”

Make it easy to keep up to date with more stories like this. Download the 13 ON YOUR SIDE app now.

Have a news tip? Email [email protected], visit our Facebook page or Twitter. Subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Source Article

Read more

‘I Did Think I Might Die’

Indiana University Health Ramya Yeleti

In April, COVID-19 spread through Ramya Yeleti’s family. First, her cardiologist dad got sick, likely from work. He tried to isolate, but soon his wife was sick and in the intensive care unit. Then Yeleti’s sister and Yeleti got sick.

The 25-year-old medical student from Carmel, Indiana, thought that COVID-19 would be “no big deal” because of her age, she told Today. And that was true at first — after about three weeks of mild symptoms, she felt better and tested positive for antibodies.

But at the end of July, Yeleti developed a fever and fatigue. As a medical student working at medical centers, she called out sick to get tested for COVID-19, and it came back negative.

“Since I already had COVID I really didn’t think I had COVID again. There was no way I was reinfected. It was like a one in a billion chance,” Yeleti said. “I thought it was some nasty flu bug.”

RELATED: Three-Quarters of Recovered Coronavirus Patients Have Heart Damage Months Later, Study Finds

Two days after her test, though, she started uncontrollably vomiting and experiencing chest pains. Yeleti’s father drove her to the hospital the next day, and her vital signs were alarmingly low. Doctors brought her to a trauma room and hooked her up to an EKG machine, which surprised Yeleti.

“As a young patient, I wasn’t expecting that,” she told the IndyStar. “It normally doesn’t happen to young patients, not for people who were young and just chilling.”

Indiana University Health Ramya Yeleti

But the EKG machine showed that her heart was failing, and pumping at just 10 percent — well below the typical 55 to 65 of a healthy heart. At that point, Yeleti passed out, and remembers wondering if she would ever wake up again.

“The doctors were obviously freaking out. Something is really, really wrong,” she thought to herself at the time. “Then I passed out. I remember just thinking I hope my family will be OK. … I did think I might die.”

RELATED: Fauci Refutes Trump’s Claims That COVID Is Going Away, Says U.S. Is ‘In for a Whole Lot of Hurt’

During the six days that Yeleti was unconscious, she was put on a cardiac life support machine, went on the heart transplant list and underwent open heart surgery. The doctors at Indiana University Health determined that she had myocarditis, a rare inflammation of the heart caused by a viral infection that can lead to heart failure, irregular heart beats and sudden death.

“There is no reason for a 25-year-old to have this,” Yeleti told Today.

RELATED VIDEO: Resident Doctor Dies of Coronavirus at 28 After Treating COVID-19 Positive Patients in the ER

Resident Doctor Dies of Coronavirus at 28 After Treating COVID-19 Positive Patients in the ER

Adeline Fagan, who was in her second year of residency, tested positive for COVID-19 in July

She also tested positive for COVID-19 during her hospital stay, and

Read more

Understanding the Virus and Its Unanswered Questions: QuickTake

1. How is this virus different?

Unlike the coronavirus responsible for the 2002-2003 outbreak in Asia of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS, this new one can spread via people who are infected but have yet to develop symptoms, or don’t at all. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 40% to 45% of SARS-CoV-2 infections occur without symptoms. A study by researchers at the Yale School of Public Health’s Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis found “silent” transmitters are responsible for more than half of the cases in Covid-19 outbreaks. What’s more, the new virus has a relatively long incubation period — the time between infection and the appearance of symptoms — enabling it to spread silently in a community before being detected. The interval is about five to six days compared with two days for the flu, which spreads the same way and is the most common cause of pandemics. The stealthy nature of the coronavirus wasn’t well understood at first and contributed to the staggered and uneven quality of the response.

Read more: Why ‘Silent Spreaders’ Make Coronavirus Hard to Beat: QuickTake

2. Why wasn’t it contained?

On Jan. 23, China imposed the most extensive quarantine in known history in Hubei province, where the outbreak began in the capital Wuhan, an industrial city of 11 million. By then, however, the virus had been seeded in other places. Starting in early February, many countries introduced travel bans but not before the virus had reached around the world. Governments issued stay-at-home orders and mandated “social distancing” to “flatten the curve” of new infections. But the economic toll propelled reopenings that in many places brought a surge in new cases, sometimes followed by new movement restrictions. It took months for some governments to recommend or mandate that people wear masks in public to counter the virus’s silent spread, and many still haven’t done so.

Read more: Mask or No Mask? And Which Kind? What the Experts Say: QuickTake

3. What’s the biggest mystery about the virus?

One major question is whether those who get the coronavirus emerge with immunity. Generally speaking, infections prompt the body to develop antibodies that protect against reinfection, although there are notable exceptions such as HIV and malaria. By mid-year a slew of antibody test kits were available, including some that could be taken at home. Many tests, however, weren’t reliable. What’s more, researchers still don’t know whether the presence of antibodies means someone has immunity, or how long that protection might last. With the main coronaviruses that cause the common cold, immunity generally doesn’t last very long. In Hong Kong, a man tested positive for the coronavirus in late August after recovering from a different strain in April, in what scientists said was the first documented case of reinfection. The man had no symptoms the second time, however, suggesting his immune system provided some protection, according to doctors. Dozens of reinfections have since been reported, according to a tracker maintained by

Read more

As U.S. COVID-19 Cases Break Records, Weekly Deaths Rise 3% | Top News

(Reuters) – The number of new COVID-19 cases in the United States hit another record high last week, rising 18% to more than 575,000, while deaths inched up 3%, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county reports.

The number of new cases reported each week has risen for four straight weeks, with the biggest increases seen in the last two weeks.

Nationally, nearly 5,800 people died of the virus in the seven days ended Nov. 1, bringing the total to over 230,000. Health experts say deaths tend to increase four to six weeks after a surge in infections.

(Open https://tmsnrt.rs/2WTOZDR in an external browser for state-by-state details)

Thirty-four out of 50 states have seen new cases increase for at least two weeks in a row, down from 36 the prior week. They include Florida, Ohio and Michigan — all hotly contested states for Tuesday’s U.S. presidential election. New cases rose 60% in Pennsylvania, another crucial state.

Texas reported the most new cases last week with over 45,600, followed by Illinois, which has half as many people, with over 44,500 new cases.

The United States performed 8.5 million COVID-19 tests last week, of which 6.8% came back positive for the new virus, compared with 6.3% the prior week, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project, a volunteer-run effort to track the outbreak.

South Dakota led the nation with the highest positive test rate at 50%, followed by Iowa at 44% and Wyoming at 43%. A total of 17 states had a positive test rate of over 10%.

The World Health Organization considers rates above 5% concerning because it suggests there are more cases in the community that have not yet been uncovered.

(Writing by Lisa Shumaker; Graphic by Chris Canipe; Editing by Tiffany Wu)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

Source Article

Read more

Work out with these active exercise titles



a woman sitting at a beach: The best fitness games for 2020 Work out with these active exercise titles image 1


© Provided by Pocket-lint
The best fitness games for 2020 Work out with these active exercise titles image 1

(Pocket-lint) – Videogames have long since moved past worries about inactivity and sedentary behaviour – while it’s true that many games will suck players into playing for hours at a time without much benefit to their physical wellbeing, the relaxation and enjoyment they offer is almost peerless.

  • Best dieting apps: 8 apps to help you lose weight at home

That said, there is still a range of games on the market that could scratch both itches, giving you fun gameplay and systems to interact with, while also getting your pulse pounding and helping you to keep active. Right now, given how many of us are spending large amounts of time at home, that could be the perfect combination.

So, to that end, we’ve gathered together some of the very best active videogames for you, so that you can get a burst of exercise without leaving your home, all with the help of your games console. 

Our pick of the best exercise games to buy or try today

Ring Fit Adventure

Nintendo’s latest fitness game, after the success of Wii Fit so many years ago, is an absolute sensation. It’s flown off the shelves, making it really difficult to find at the moment, but if you can spot it in stock anywhere it’s the perfect fitness title for the stay-at-home age. 

With the aid of flexible Ring-con controller and a leg strap, you’ll squat, stretch and flex your way through workouts masquerading as a quasi-RPG, and have a great time doing it. It’s beautifully designed and will help you get a bit fitter while monitoring your progress and encouraging you along the way.

Just Dance 2021

Another staple on the active gaming scene is the Just Dance series, which is available on the Switch, Xbox One and PS4. It’s a full-body rhythm action game, challenging you to dance along to a soundtrack full of popping tracks, matching your movements to the directions on-screen.

It’s a colourful, glorious bit of fun, and while it doesn’t have to be massively exerting if you play it concertedly and make sure to keep up the regularity of your sessions, it can be a great way of staying active without necessarily feeling like you’re flogging yourself with workouts. 

Fitness Boxing

Another great game for the Switch, Fitness Boxing takes maximum advantage of the Joy-Con controllers to let you take virtual boxing lessons and punch your way to getting fit.

It’s more explicitly about fitness than some of the others on this list, which brings with it a different tone and a bit more potential intensity to make sure that even if you get properly in shape it’ll still offer up solid workouts. It might not have the lustre of more mainstream efforts, but it’s still a great option. 

Beat Saber

Moving into the world of VR, Beat Saber is a really fun VR game that’s pretty taxing

Read more

Prince William reportedly kept his coronavirus diagnosis a secret for this reason, royal expert claims

EXCLUSIVE: There’s a reason why Prince William may have kept his coronavirus diagnosis a secret from the world.

On Monday, The Sun reported the 38-year-old royal “struggled to breathe” while he battled the novel virus back in April during the early days of the global pandemic. The U.K.-based outlet reported the Duke of Cambridge didn’t speak out about the illness to avoid alarming the public.

“Here in Britain, there is controversy over the fact that we now discovered that he had COVID-19 back at the beginning of the first spike and he concealed it,” royal author Robert Lacey told Fox News. “At the time, the prime minister had coronavirus, his father had coronavirus.”

Lacey, who serves as a historical consultant to the hit Netflix series “The Crown,” recently released a new book titled “Battle of Brothers: William and Harry – The Inside Story of a Family in Tumult,” which examines the relationship and alleged feud between Princess Diana’s two sons.

PRINCE WILLIAM FOUGHT OFF CORONAVIRUS IN APRIL: REPORT

Britain's Prince William was reportedly diagnosed with coronavirus in April.

Britain’s Prince William was reportedly diagnosed with coronavirus in April.
(Photo by Tim Rooke/Pool/Samir Hussein/WireImage/Getty)

Lacey, who has been writing about the British royal family for 40 years and previously worked at the royal archives, spoke to numerous palace insiders for his latest release.

“[William] decided the world didn’t need him to be the third high-profiled coronavirus victim,” Lacey explained. “He followed all the rules. He did the quarantine, the self-isolating. He did Zoom, even while he was ill, and then got back to work.”

William reportedly tested positive only days after his father, Prince Charles, also tested positive for COVID-19 in late March.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson also contracted the virus around the same time. It is currently unclear if any other royals contracted the virus. It is believed William was treated by palace doctors and isolated in his Norfolk family home, Anmer Hall.

QUEEN ELIZABETH STEPS OUT WITH PRINCE WILLIAM FOR FIRST PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT SINCE MARCH

Prince William's father Prince Charles (pictured) was diagnosed with coronavirus in late March.

Prince William’s father Prince Charles (pictured) was diagnosed with coronavirus in late March.
(Getty)

A source told the outlet that the Duke of Cambridge, who is second in line to the throne, “was hit pretty hard by the virus.”

“At one stage he was struggling to breathe, so obviously everyone around him was pretty panicked,” they added. “After seeing medics and testing positive — which was obviously quite a shock given how fit and healthy he is — William was determined it should be business as usual though.”

After April 9, the royal took a weeklong break from phone calls and engagements before virtually opening the Nightingale Hospital Birmingham on April 16.

“People have said this is not right for an heir to the throne to keep this sort of thing a secret,” said Lacey. “He should be open. He’s hiding things from us. I, myself, in this case, do not agree with that criticism. It’s not unconstitutional to choose to be ill in private. He doesn’t have to share his pains and tribulations

Read more