Alabama official with COVID opposes mask mandate

Alabama Lt. Gov. Will Ainsworth said Thursday that he remains opposed to mandatory mask orders despite being diagnosed with COVID-19, even though he encourages people to wear one.

The Republican lieutenant governor announced Wednesday that he tested positive for the coronavirus. He said he sought a test after learning someone in his Sunday school group had COVID-19.

“I have always encouraged mask-wearing, and I wear one in my daily life, Ainsworth said in a statement, adding that: “At the same time, I believe in personal responsibility and think everyone has the right to make their own choices regarding their health.”

Ainsworth has been critical of the state’s COVID-19 response under Republican Gov. Kay Ivey. In March, he criticized what he said at the time was the state’s slow response to prepare for a possible “tsunami of hospital patients.” But he has also been critical of the state’s mandatory mask order. He said last month that “masks should be voluntary, not mandatory.”

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— France extends curfew to 38 regions because of coronavirus surge

— African health officials expect WHO distribution of rapid virus tests

— Oxford vaccine trial continues amid death report

— Britain offering financial help for bars, pubs and restaurants struggling because of restrictions due to the coronavirus.

— Czech Republic enters second lockdown to avoid health system collapse. New measures include closing stores, shopping malls and hotels.

— Photographer in Dubai providing free photo shoots to laid-off expats forced to leave the skyscraper-studded Persian Gulf city because of the pandemic.

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Follow all of AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

Tallahassee, Fla. — Florida plans to more closely scrutinize deaths attributed to the coronavirus, as the state Department of Health notes some people listed as COVID-19 fatalities died months after testing positive.

The state will not backtrack to reexamine the more than 16,000 deaths attributed to the virus, but rather take a closer look at deaths going forward, said Fred Piccolo, a spokesman for Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, speaking Thursday.

And the state won’t immediately discount those who tested positive for coronavirus and died weeks afterwards, recognizing the virus may have caused damage that contributed to the death, he added.

Florida reported more than 5,500 new COVID-19 cases Thursday, raising the seven-day average in daily reported cases to about 3,300. That’s about 1,000 more per day since the beginning of the month.

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SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Gov. Kristi Noem has insisted South Dakota is excelling in its handling of the pandemic, although the state surpassed 9,000 active coronavirus cases and matched an all-time high for deaths reported in a day.

The state ranks second in the country in new infections per capita over the last two weeks, according to Johns Hopkins University data. There were about 1,036 new cases per 100,000 people in South Dakota, meaning that about one in every 97 people in the state has tested

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PM admits failings as England’s Covid contact-tracing system hits new low

Boris Johnson and his chief scientific adviser have admitted to failings in England’s £12bn test-and-trace system as contact-tracing fell to a new low and waiting times for test results soared to almost double the target.



a group of people walking down a street next to a car: Photograph: Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images

Under pressure to explain new figures showing less than 60% of close contacts being reached, while test turnaround times rose to nearly 48 hours, the prime minister said: “I share people’s frustrations and I understand totally why we do need to see faster turnaround times and we need to improve it.”

The system, designed to contain outbreaks by ensuring anyone exposed to the virus self-isolates, was helping “a bit”, Johnson added. “The thing depends on people self-isolating and breaking the transmission. It is helping a bit already to break the transmission. About 1m contacts have been reached. But there is more that it can do if everybody complies once they are contacted by NHS Test and Trace.”



a person riding on the back of a car: Workers at a drive-in Covid testing centre. In the week ending 14 October, 59.6% of close contacts were reached by test and trace.


© Photograph: Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images
Workers at a drive-in Covid testing centre. In the week ending 14 October, 59.6% of close contacts were reached by test and trace.

Alongside him at a Downing Street press conference, Sir Patrick Vallance said problems with test and trace were in part inevitable as coronavirus cases rose in the second wave – but also a result of the system’s operation. They were “diminishing its effectiveness”, he said.

Another expert said test and trace was “struggling to make any difference to the pandemic”.

In the week ending 14 October, 59.6% of close contacts were reached, down from the previous week’s figure of 62.6%, which was the lowest since the test-and-trace operation was launched at the end of May.

Sage said in May that at least 80% of contacts must be reached for the system, described as “world-beating” by the government, to be effective. Documents published last week show Sage considers its success to be “marginal”.

In fact the true proportion of contacts of Covid patients reached is lower still: the latest report reveals 101,494 people tested positive but only 96,521 were transferred to the contact-tracing system, of whom just over 80% were reached and asked to provide information about their contacts. That means, overall, only 46% of close contacts were reached.

The latest performance statistics, published on Thursday, also showed Boris Johnson is further from delivering on his pledge that the results of all in-person tests will be returned within 24 hours.

The median time taken to receive a test result at regional sites rose to 45 hours, from 28 the previous week. Local test site result times increased to 47 hours from 29, and mobile test units rose to 41 hours from 26.

Vallance told a Downing Street press conference on Thursday: “It’s really important to concentrate on numbers of contacts [and] isolation as quickly as you can and getting things back as quickly as you can, ideally to get the whole process done within 48 hours. And it’s very clear there’s room

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Noem says South Dakota is doing ‘good’ as virus surges

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Gov. Kristi Noem has insisted South Dakota is excelling in its handling of the pandemic, even though the state surpassed 9,000 active coronavirus cases on Thursday and matched an all-time high for deaths reported in a day.

The state ranks second in the country in new infections per capita over the last two weeks, according to Johns Hopkins University data. There were about 1,036 new cases per 100,000 people in South Dakota, meaning that about one in every 97 people in the state has tested positive for the virus in the last two weeks. Health officials on Thursday also reported an all-time high of 973 new cases.

But the Republican governor has used her refusal to issue mandates to vault to nationwide relevance among conservatives. She told Fox News on Wednesday night: “We’re doing really good in South Dakota. We’re managing COVID-19, but also our economy is thriving.”

Health officials reported Thursday that the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 reached a record high with 355 in hospitals, including 75 in Intensive Care Units. The state matched its record of 14 deaths in a day.

Noem has said COVID-19 hospitalizations account for a relatively small percentage of total hospital capacity and that hospitals are still handling an influx of patients for other health issues. Currently, 35% of general-care hospital beds and 36% of Intensive Care Units remain open, according to the Department of Health.


However, both of the state’s largest hospital systems have altered the logistics of some elective procedures to free up space and staff to handle the virus surge. Without a statewide mask mandate in place, the hospital systems have also urged people to wear masks when they are around people outside of their households.

The hospital systems got support on that message from Sioux Falls Mayor Paul TenHaken, who earlier this week put it bluntly: “Wear a dang mask.”

But Noem has made it clear she will not institute a mask requirement and doubts the usefulness of the recommendation from the nation’s top health experts that widespread masking helps prevent infections from spreading.

In an opinion article published Wednesday, the governor pointed to doctors who say it is not clear how effective masks are in preventing infections. She said places with mask mandates have still seen case growth, but conceded that masks are “appropriate” in hospitals or when caring for someone with COVID-19 symptoms.

Noem’s opinion piece also included a link to an article on masks from a conservative medical group called Association of American Physicians and Surgeons. The group has a history of staking out unorthodox positions on medical issues, including calling mass vaccinations “equivalent to human experimentation” and opposing Medicare, the government-funded health insurance for older people.

More recently, the group has s poken out against lockdowns to prevent the spread of the virus and encouraged treating COVID-19 with hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug that President Donald Trump pushed before the Food and Drug Administration revoked its emergency-use authorization. Noem also

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Novel Dementia Risk Charts Underline the Role of Lifestyle

Ten-year dementia risk charts that combine cardiovascular and genetic risk factors have been developed by Danish researchers and graphically underline the impact of modifiable lifestyle factors, even in the face of increased genetic risk.

The research was presented at the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) 2020 Virtual Congress, held online this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and simultaneously published October 7 in the European Heart Journal.

Ida Juul Rasmussen, MD, PhD, Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, combined data from more than 60,000 patients — more than 2000 with dementia — with a median follow-up of 10 years.

By combining genetic risk factors with gender and age, as well as lifestyle factors — such as diabetes, smoking, and educational level — they were able to develop a series of risk charts similar to those for cardiovascular risk from the Framingham study.

This showed that a women at least 80 years of age with the highest genetic risk factors who had diabetes, smoked, and had a low educational level would have a 66% risk for dementia over 10 years; this would drop to 45% if she did not smoke or have diabetes and had a higher educational level.

With this pattern repeated across age groups and in both men and women, Rasmussen said that “the overall message from this study is that a healthy cardiovascular risk lifestyle attenuates genetic susceptibility for dementia.”

She added that “by combining genetic risk factors and modifiable risk factors, we are indeed able to identify the individuals at the highest risk of a future dementia disease that would benefit the most” from an intensive lifestyle intervention.

Ralph L. Sacco, MD, professor and chair of neurology and executive director at the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute, Leonard Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology that an “important message” of the study is that lifestyle factors still have an appreciable impact on the risk for dementia, even in those at high genetic risk.

“I think the novelty here is the combination of cardiovascular lifestyle factors and the genetics,” Sacco said.

“In the past, there are numerous scores that have been developed on the lifestyle side, some developed on the genetic side, but this group combined both, and I think that makes it an important and well-done comprehensive risk model.”

However, Sacco noted that there were some limitations to the study, saying that the way in which some of the risk factors were defined “is pretty, I would say, crude,” citing, for example, the threshold for hypertension of 140/90 mm Hg blood pressure or medications, or 4 hours a week for high physical activity.

He also believes that the concept of the tables may not fit with the way in which, “nowadays, everybody works with an app and a portable device,” allowing them to enter continuous measures rather than rely on “categorical definitions.”

Sacco added that the very idea of using risk stratification to assign individuals to lifestyle interventions to lower

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The US just topped 1,100 coronavirus deaths a day. One state is getting National Guard help, and others keep breaking records

You know Covid-19 is out of control when health officials are so overwhelmed, they can’t notify close contacts who may be infected.



a person holding a sign: Oct. 13, 2020; Phoenix, Arizona; Delta Air Lines has no-touch boarding at Sky Harbor International Airport. Delta Air Lines is promoting their health and safety practices in the COVID-19 air travel era.


© Rob Schumacher/The Republic/USA Today Network
Oct. 13, 2020; Phoenix, Arizona; Delta Air Lines has no-touch boarding at Sky Harbor International Airport. Delta Air Lines is promoting their health and safety practices in the COVID-19 air travel era.

That’s what’s happening in North Dakota, one of 31 states suffering more new Covid-19 cases this past week compared to the previous week.

Contact tracing is crucial to finding possible carriers of coronavirus, so they can quarantine and break the chain of infection.

But a “sharp increase” in new cases has engulfed contact tracers, leading to delays and “a backlog of positive cases that have yet to be assigned to a case investigator,” the North Dakota Department of Health said this week.

“Close contacts will no longer be contacted by public health officials; instead, positive individuals will be instructed to self-notify their close contacts and direct them to the NDDoH website, where landing pages will be created … explaining the recommended and required actions for both positive patients and close contacts.”

The North Dakota National Guard has shifted 50 soldiers from contacting close contacts to notifying people who have tested positive, the state health department said.

‘No safe period of time’ to be maskless with someone outside your bubble

Nationwide, all Americans need to double down on safety measures now that the definition of “close contacts” has expanded.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just broadened “close contacts” to include anyone you may have had brief contact with, within 6 feet, during a combined 15 minutes over the course of a day. (Previously, the CDC defined close contacts as anyone you had close encounters with for at least 15 minutes straight.)

“It reiterates the importance of everybody wearing a mask,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health.

Jha and other health experts say there’s nothing magical about 15 minutes, and that the public shouldn’t assume spending less time with people without masks is safe.

“There is no safe period of time to be with somebody who’s not part of your bubble if both of you are not wearing masks,” he said.

“It’s really critical that people wear masks if you’re going to be with somebody for any period of time, even if it’s less than 15 minutes.”

The new CDC guidance came after researchers discovered even brief exposures (less than 15 minutes each) with an infected person nearby can silently spread coronavirus.

“A mask can protect other people from the virus-containing particles exhaled by someone who has COVID-19. As many as half of all people who have COVID-19 don’t show symptoms, so it’s critical to wear a mask because you could be carrying the virus and not know it,” the CDC said.

“While a mask provides some limited protection to the wearer, each additional person who wears a mask increases the individual

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COVID-19 safety precautions at the presidential debate are ‘adequate,’ but may leave some in danger, experts say

Clear dividers are seen on stage as preparations are made for the final presidential debate between President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Clear dividers are seen onstage as preparations are made for the final presidential debate between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images)

President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden will face off in the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville on Thursday night, just weeks after the president contracted and recovered from COVID-19. Experts say the precautions that have been taken to prevent the spread of the virus are a step in the right direction, but could still leave some of the estimated 200 attendees at risk.

The Commission on Presidential Debates, which sponsors the event, has reportedly put several protective measures in place, including a mask mandate for attendees, pre-testing ahead of the event and social distancing in the audience. Biden has reportedly already tested negative for the virus, and in an email from Yahoo Life asking about President Trump’s status, a spokesperson for his campaign replied that “the President will be cleared by the White House Medical Unit.” White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told reporters on Thursday the president was tested for COVID-19 on his flight to Nashville and was negative.

The two candidates will be separated by plexiglass dividers, and the Nashville Public Health Department is reportedly also installing separate HVAC systems near each candidate to increase airflow. But in a press conference Thursday morning, Nashville Mayor John Cooper warned that a “surge” in cases was occurring in the city, now averaging 175 new infections a day. “Health experts have warned that we need to double down on masks and social distancing to stop this surge in its tracks,” Cooper said.

Nashville experienced a drop in daily COVID-19 cases in September, but city officials have reported a rapid rise in the last weeks — including 249 cases in the past 24 hours alone. In total, Davidson County, where Nashville is located, has 30,115 cases and 328 deaths since the pandemic began, according to Thursday data from the Tennessee Department of Health.

Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has highlighted the importance of ventilation, Dr. Saskia Popescu, an infection prevention specialist at George Mason University, says that the HVAC systems aren’t necessarily as useful as they seem. “I’m assuming they’re saying that they’re using separate air handling units for the candidates … but I’m not sure how that would be a panacea,” she tells Yahoo Life. “Increasing air exchanges and filtration is the goal.”

Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security, thinks the precautions taken to protect Trump and Biden are slightly over the top. “I think that they’re just kind of going above and beyond for most of this,” Adalja tells Yahoo Life. “I don’t think that is going to make much of a difference in transmission risk, especially since President Trump is not really a person who can be infected with the virus.” The audience precautions, however, are sufficient.

The fact

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Study: HIV-positive adults show early signs of aging, even after antiretroviral therapy

Oct. 22 (UPI) — People with HIV may experience aging-related illnesses, such as heart disease and brain disorders, earlier than those without the virus, even if they have been on antiretroviral therapy, a study published Thursday by the journal Pathogens and Immunity found.

The analysis, which compared 15 HIV-positive adults on antiretroviral therapy to 15 age-matched people without the virus, found that those being treated with the drugs showed increased evidence of cellular aging, the researchers said.

Antiretroviral therapies, or ART, are intended to slow the progression of HIV and reduce the level of the virus in the body.

While ART has led to people with HIV living longer, they are still at higher risk for having a “reduced healthspan” — or developing age-related health complications — than those without the virus, according to the researchers.

“Most individuals living with HIV probably already know that they are facing more health challenges than their uninfected peers, so the main takeaway from this study is that we’re now beginning to better understand why that is,” study co-author Beth D. Jamieson told UPI.

“It’s clear that the antiretroviral therapies aren’t causing this aging acceleration. It appears to be the virus and … the antiretroviral therapies appear to help reverse some of this aging, but the changes are less robust and much slower than we’d like to see,” said Jamieson, a professor of medicine in the division of hematology and oncology at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine.

About 1.4 million adults in the United States have HIV, and nearly 40,000 are diagnosed with the virus each year, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Research suggests that ART drugs bolster the immune systems of those with the disease, allowing them to better fight off infections and, effectively, enabling them to live close-to-normal lifespans.

However, treated HIV-infected adults still experience earlier declines in physical functions, as well as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, kidney failure, liver cancer and neurological disorders than otherwise healthy adults, Jamieson and her colleagues said.

For their research, the UCLA-based team assessed 30 study participants — 15 receiving ART for HIV and 15 healthy controls — for signs of cellular aging. DNA samples collected from all study subjects were analyzed using the epigenetic clock, a biochemical test used to measure aging.

In the HIV-positive participants, DNA samples were collected at three points — six months to one year before starting ART, six to 12 months after beginning treatment and 18 to 24 months later.

Before starting ART, the DNA participants with HIV all had significantly higher levels of four measures for cellular aging — age acceleration residual, extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration, phenotypic epigenetic age acceleration and Grim epigenetic age acceleration — than the uninfected adults, the researchers said.

That remained true six to 12 months after the HIV-positive participants started ART. However, 18 to 24 months after starting therapy, only levels of residual and extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration remained higher in those with HIV, the analysis

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Garmin Made an ESports Fitness Smartwatch for Streamers

I hate this so much.

I hate this so much.
Image: Garmin

No one:

Absolutely no one:

Garmin: What’s up fam, it’s ya boi Garmin here with a new GPS esports smartwatch that you can use to livestream your biometric stats on Twitch or whatever it is you use to stream you crushing your opponents!

I wish I were joking, but 2020 continues to test everyone’s sanity. Garmin has actually launched the Instinct Esports Edition, a “rugged GPS smartwatch uniquely designed for esports athletes and enthusiasts to take their gaming performance to the next level.” How is that possible, you ask? Well, for starters, the watch adds an esports activity for tracking so you can monitor your heart rate and stress during a game. Garmin also developed a new PC streaming tool that’s called, sigh, STR3AMUP!, so you can create overlays that let viewers know your heart rate, stress, and “body battery” level in realtime. Did I mention this watch is also $300?

Illustration for article titled Garmin Made an Esports Fitness Smartwatch for Streamers Because We Live in Hell

“Elite athletes around the world depend on Garmin products to monitor and improve their performance,” Garmin’s VP of Sales Dan Bartel said in the press release.

This, so far, is a true statement. The following is more dubious.

“With the Instinct Esports Edition, esports athletes can tap into that same technology to track and examine how their body responds to intense competition. Players can also use Instinct’s data to make adjustments in their daily lives, whether it be altering sleep patterns or activity levels, which can result in increased cognitive and physical performance during play.”

There is a lot to unpack there. While elite esports athletes do train, my impression is that they aren’t spending hours riding dirt bikes, running marathons with gaming keyboards strapped to their chests, or scuba diving mid-competition. I’m not saying all esports players are schlubby basement gremlins who don’t engage in any physical activity at all. There’s coverage disproving that, and sports-like training is already happening among some elite esports teams. What I’m saying is a rugged outdoors GPS smartwatch built to military-grade standards, primarily targeted at triathletes, is overkill for gamers.

The Instinct Esports Editions specs are truly bananas. This watch has a transflective screen, which is normally found in watches geared toward outdoor activity for visibility under direct sunlight. It’s also rated for 10 ATM of water resistance, or a depth of 330 feet. That is double the rating that is widely considered safe for swimming. In terms of sensors, it also sports a compass, barometric altimeter, and thermometer on top of the usual accelerometer and built-in GPS. Like I said: Overkill.

The idea of stress-tracking is kind of cool—except most stress features aren’t built for real-time monitoring. They’re more related to how much your body has physically recovered from the previous day’s activities. According to Garmin’s own website, the watch monitors stress using heart rate variability data. HRV is essentially the time in between heartbeats, and as explained by Harvard Medical School,

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Acute Care Measure Could Reduce Hospital Readmission Penalties

About one in four hospitals would see their penalty status change under the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) if penalties were determined using “excess days in acute care” (EDAC), a more comprehensive measure of hospital use after discharge, instead of looking only at 30-day readmissions.

The EDAC measure captures all days spent in acute care settings within 30 days of discharge, including emergency department (ED) visits, observation stays, and unplanned readmissions.

In the study, published online October 13 in Annals of Internal Medicine, half of hospitals in the highest-performing group under the more blunt 30-day readmissions measure would fall to a lower-performing group if EDAC were used.

Conversely, a similar number of low-performing hospitals would jump to a higher stratum.

“We know that linking the 30-day readmission measure to penalties under the HRRP has led to intensified efforts to treat patients in the ED or as observation stays,” said lead author Rishi Wadhera, MD, MPP, MPhil Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston. “While this makes hospitals’ readmission rates look lower, it’s not clear that these shifts are actually good for patient care.”

Given the $3 billion in penalties assessed by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) under the HRRP since its implementation in 2012, a switch to EDAC could help pull some struggling hospitals back from the brink.

Of particular concern, said Wadhera, is evidence showing that small rural and less resourced hospitals might be taking the brunt of those penalties.

“Large hospitals have the capacity and infrastructure to treat patients in the ER or place them in observation status, such that these encounters won’t count as readmissions. Small rural hospitals don’t have that capacity and may be unfairly penalized,” he suggested.

This new study compared the impact of the standard 30-day readmissions measure with the EDAC measure in 3173 hospitals that participated in the HRRP in 2019.

Because of ongoing concerns regarding unintended consequences associated with the 30-day readmissions measure, including a possibility of increased mortality among patients admitted with heart failure and pneumonia, there have been numerous calls from the clinician and health policy communities, including a recent one in JAMA from Ashish K. Jha, MD, MPH, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island, to replace the metric with a more comprehensive measure of hospital use.

EDAC was developed for CMS and has been publicly reported since 2017, but is not included in the HRRP. Like the 30-day readmissions measure, however, it does not fully adjust for risk factors like frailty and medical complexity.

The EDAC measure would diminish the perverse incentive to avoid readmitting patients who come back to the hospital.

“One advantage of the EDAC measure is that it’s comprehensive and less gameable, because it counts all hospital encounters after discharge, including ED visits, observation stays, and/or readmissions. The EDAC measure would diminish the perverse incentive to avoid readmitting patients who come back to the hospital and allow for fairer comparisons of hospital performance,” said Wadhera.

“But at best, switching from 30-day

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Coronavirus deaths 5 times higher than flu in hospitalized patients, CDC says

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Study authors analyzed health records for nearly 4,000 COVID-19 patients and over 5,400 flu patients from the Veterans Health Administration and compared the complications for each. 

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FLU VACCINE IN KIDS REDUCES RISK OF RELATED HOSPITALIZATIONS, STUDY FINDS

“The percentage of COVID-19 patients who died while hospitalized (21.0%) was more than five times that of influenza [flu] patients (3.8%), and the duration of hospitalization was almost three times longer for COVID-19 patients,” the authors wrote. Also, the percentage of coronavirus patients who were sent to the intensive care unit more than doubled flu patients.

Further, they found that coronavirus patients were at a higher risk for 17 other complications, including respiratory and neurologic issues.

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>
(iStock)

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>
(iStock)

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES UPDATED CPR GUIDELINES THAT EMPHASIZE RECOVERY

After adjusting for variables like age and comorbidities among coronavirus patients, those from minority groups had a higher risk of nine complications, including respiratory and neurologic issues.

“The higher risk for certain complications among racial and ethnic minority patients provides further evidence that certain racial and ethnic minority groups are disproportionally affected by COVID-19 and that this disparity is not solely accounted for by age and underlying medical conditions,” authors wrote.

The coronavirus patients in the study were on average “slightly older” than the flu patients (70 vs. 69 years old, respectively), the study noted, but the flu patients had more underlying health issues.

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The CDC said health care providers need to be diligent about looking for symptoms to improve patient mortality and lower long-term disability.

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