Tag: states

 

Coronavirus US: More than 40 states are reporting an increase in Covid-19 cases and many in the Midwest are seeing record hospitalizations

The seven-day average is part of a fall surge that has brought the national case count to more than 8.8 million, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Four of the five highest number of cases in a single day were recorded in the last seven days, with the top two reported on Friday and Saturday. And 41 states are reporting at least 10% more cases compared to the week before.

When it comes to the climbing metric, the US is “not in a good place,” director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci said during a virtual Q&A on Wednesday. Health experts have pushed measures against the virus to bring the baseline of infections down before colder months drove them back up. But rising records of cases and hospitalizations are making up “a bad recipe for a tough time ahead,” Fauci said.

In the Midwest, residents are being impacted by the rising cases with spiking rates of hospitalizations.

Indiana and Wisconsin reported their peak levels of coronavirus hospitalizations. And Kansas saw the most ICU hospitalizations of the virus in one day, the same day the state surpassed 1,000 deaths since the pandemic began.

“Each one of these Kansans was someone’s child, parent, or grandparent,” Gov. Laura Kelly said in a release. “They were part of a community.”

On Wednesday, 13 states reported more hospitalization records, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

Mask mandates lower hospitalizations, study says

Mask mandates may be a key strategy to lowering rates of hospitalization, according to the findings of a study from Vanderbilt School of Medicine.

In hospitals where more than 75% of the patients came from counties that required masks, rates of hospitalizations did not rise between July and October, while hospitals with fewer than 25% of patients from those counties saw an increase over 200%.

Fact check: Trump falsely claims California requires people to wear 'special' and 'complex' mask at all times

Other mitigation factors likely came into play, as areas with mask requirements are more likely to have residents who follow other mitigation strategies, the authors wrote.

“The good news is that we have learned a great deal since the beginning of the pandemic,” they said. “An important takeaway from this analysis is that areas with virus mitigation strategies … have seen lower growth in hospitalizations since the summer months; hospitals in these areas are in a much better position to serve the entire spectrum of community health needs, not just COVID-19 patients.”

As the weather continues to grow colder, Fauci said in an interview with CNBC Wednesday that he supports a national mask mandate.

“We’re going to have many more hospitalizations and that will inevitably lead to more deaths. So, this is an untenable situation. That’s the reason why I say we have got to do these things,” Fauci said.

While he is in support of a mask mandate, Fauci said he doesn’t think it will happen nationally “because it might not come from the White House to do it.”

States concerned over alarming hospitalization rates

Many state leaders are putting measures

Strive Health Partners with Nearly 200 Nephrology Providers Across Multiple States to Implement Innovative Medicare Kidney Care Program

Strive Health, a national innovator in value-based kidney care, today announced that it has partnered with nearly 200 physicians and advanced practitioners from 20 nephrology groups across several states to participate in Medicare’s Comprehensive Kidney Care Contracting options of the Kidney Care Choices model (CKCC).

CKCC is a new Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) payment innovation model that incentivizes healthcare providers to manage the care of Medicare beneficiaries with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4 and 5 and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Unlike prior value-based kidney care models, CKCC addresses both CKD and ESRD beneficiaries and aligns patients based on nephrology care, not dialysis treatments. The implementation period for the program started on October 15, 2020 and the official launch of the performance period is on April 1, 2021.

“New payment models like CKCC are putting nephrologists at the center and creating meaningful opportunities to transform care for our patients,” said Gary Singer, MD, a nephrologist who leads Midwest Nephrology Associates in St. Louis, MO. “We looked for a partner whose incentives align with our goal of delaying the progression of kidney disease, and whose model blends technological innovation with high-touch care. We believe Strive is well-positioned to support us in CKCC and beyond.”

Strive Health provides technology, high-touch care teams, and management expertise that empower nephrologists to participate and succeed in new value-based kidney care models. Physicians partnering with Strive gain access to advanced tools and resources that improve care delivery, such as sophisticated data science models that predict CKD disease progression with greater than 95% accuracy. Physicians also participate in performance-based incentive programs that reward high-quality and low-cost patient outcomes.

“Our company is the market leader in transformative, value-based kidney care. The new CMMI models take an exciting step in the right direction and create unprecedented opportunities for nephrologists to innovate and be rewarded for high-quality, long-term care goals over individual treatments,” said Chris Riopelle, CEO and co-founder of Strive Health.

Through partnerships with nephrologists and direct care arrangements, Strive manages thousands of complex CKD and ESRD patients in five states today and will be managing, or supporting the management of, more than 30,000 patients in 12 states by early 2021. The company is actively launching new value-based kidney care arrangements with commercial payors, health systems, and medical groups – most recently announced include Humana and Conviva Health – and engaging local nephrologists as central care providers within these models. Future growth plans include new application opportunities for CKCC and additional government programs.

About Strive Health

Strive Health is a national innovator in value-based kidney care and partner of choice for leading healthcare payors and providers. Through a unique combination of high-touch care teams, advanced technology, seamless integration with local providers, and next-generation dialysis services, Strive deploys an integrated care delivery system that supports the entire patient journey from chronic kidney disease (CKD) to end stage renal disease (ESRD). Strive partners with commercial and Medicare Advantage payors, Medicare, health systems, and physicians through

Hospitals across 38 states report increase in COVID-19 patients

The coronavirus is spreading faster than ever in the U.S., with the highest one-week average of new cases since the pandemic began. Thirty-eight states are reporting increases in the number of hospitalized patients compared to two weeks ago.

The situation is especially dire in seven states — Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas — where many intensive care units are near or at capacity. Average daily deaths have also edged back up to about 800 Americans per day, according to Johns Hopkins University. It’s a level not seen in more than a month.

In Utah, hospitals pushed to the brink are preparing to ration care. 

Dr. Todd Vento, the top infectious disease doctor at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, told CBS News, “I would say that if you don’t think that your daily actions affect others that you’ve never met, you’re wrong. Everything we do that circulates the virus eventually makes it so that it might get to someone who ends up in the hospital.”

In the Midwest, the surge has been especially hard. Wisconsin saw 5,262 new cases, according to state health officials, which is its highest daily uptick in cases since the pandemic began. Illinois saw 4,000 new cases, and daily deaths have risen 58.3%, the state Department of Public Health reported.

“We have got to reverse the trend and slow the spread of this virus,” said Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker.

COVID-19 cases in kids are also rising — up more than 14% in two weeks, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. And now, a British study suggests coronavirus antibodies might only last months — similar to those for the common cold.

The average number of new COVID-19 cases in New Jersey has jumped by more than 45% in the last two weeks. In the city of Newark, where the coronavirus positivity rate is topping more than 11%, new restrictions are in effect.

“It’s not panic. It’s calculated strategies to do what we know works here in Newark,” Dr. Mark Wade, director of the Newark Department of Health and Community Wellness, told CBS News.

Starting Tuesday night, all non-essential businesses and indoor dining in Newark will shut down at 8 p.m. until at least November 10.

Meanwhile, on the vaccine front, drugmaker Pfizer announced Tuesday that it plans to apply for emergency-use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for its COVID-19 vaccine in November.

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More than half of US states reported their highest day of coronavirus cases this month

The fall surge has ushered in daunting rates of Covid-19 spread, with 29 states reporting at least one record high day of new cases since October began, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.



background pattern: Reading, PA - October 13: A nurse puts a swab into a vial after administering a test. At the state run free COVID-19 testing site setup on Front Street in Reading, PA outside FirstEnergy Stadium Tuesday morning October 13, 2020. The site will be there for 5 days and was setup in response to an increase in cases in Berks County. (Photo by Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)


© Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle/Getty Images
Reading, PA – October 13: A nurse puts a swab into a vial after administering a test. At the state run free COVID-19 testing site setup on Front Street in Reading, PA outside FirstEnergy Stadium Tuesday morning October 13, 2020. The site will be there for 5 days and was setup in response to an increase in cases in Berks County. (Photo by Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

The record spread has brought the national total to more than 8.7 million infections and 226,723 deaths. And with this spike holding the potential to be the worst yet, experts warn that the impact of the virus will likely get worse.

“We’re rising quickly. If we just go back about six, seven weeks ago to Labor Day, we were at about 35,000 cases a day,” Dr. Ashish Jha, the dean of Brown University School of Public Health, said Tuesday. “We’re above 70,000 and just heading up. I would not be surprised if we end up getting to 100,000.” The United States added 73,240 new cases Tuesday, and a record peak of more than 83,000 cases was reported on Friday.

The rise in cases has been followed closely behind by an increase in coronavirus deaths.

This month, 11 states reported their highest single day of new deaths since the pandemic began. And though researchers are racing toward a vaccine, health experts have cautioned that the public needs to take the virus seriously in the meantime.

“If we continue our current behavior, by the time we start to go down the other side of the curve, a half a million people will be dead,” CNN Medical Analyst Dr. Jonathan Reiner said Tuesday.

Under the current conditions, more than 2,000 people are predicted to die of the virus daily by January 1, according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

Imminent threats to hospital capacity

Forty states are reporting an increase of daily average cases by more than 10% compared to last week, and many are feeling the impact in their hospitalization rates.

Even with a hospital facility opened on fair grounds in Wisconsin, rising cases are threatening the capacity of health care facilities in the state, Gov. Tony Evers said.

“There is no way to sugarcoat it, we are facing an urgent crisis and there is an imminent risk to you and your family,” Gov. Tony Evers said.

Ohio, one of the states to report a record of daily cases this month, is also seeing a surge in coronavirus hospitalizations — one that “is noticeably sharper, steeper than the increase we saw during the summer peak,” Gov. Mike DeWine said.

ICU admissions in the state have doubled since the start of the month, he said.

Hospitals across 38 states report increase in coronavirus patients

The coronavirus is spreading faster than ever in the U.S., with the highest one-week average of new cases since the pandemic began. Thirty-eight states are reporting increases in the number of hospitalized patients compared to two weeks ago.



a group of people in a room: Hospital


© CBS News
Hospital

The situation is especially dire in seven states — Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas — where many intensive care units are near or at capacity. Average daily deaths have also edged back up to about 800 Americans per day, according to Johns Hopkins University. It’s a level not seen in more than a month.

In Utah, hospitals pushed to the brink are preparing to ration care. 

Dr. Todd Vento, the top infectious disease doctor at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, told CBS News, “I would say that if you don’t think that your daily actions affect others that you’ve never met, you’re wrong. Everything we do that circulates the virus eventually makes it so that it might get to someone who ends up in the hospital.”

Coronavirus patients flooding hospitals as infections spread in 43 states

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In the Midwest, the surge has been especially hard. Wisconsin saw 5,262 new cases, according to state health officials, which is its highest daily uptick in cases since the pandemic began. Illinois saw 4,000 new cases, and daily deaths have risen 58.3%, the state Department of Public Health reported.

“We have got to reverse the trend and slow the spread of this virus,” said Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker.

COVID-19 cases in kids are also rising — up more than 14% in two weeks, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. And now, a British study suggests coronavirus antibodies might only last months — similar to those for the common cold.

The average number of new COVID-19 cases in New Jersey has jumped by more than 45% in the last two weeks. In the city of Newark, where the coronavirus positivity rate is topping more than 11%, new restrictions are in effect.

“It’s not panic. It’s calculated strategies to do what we know works here in Newark,” Dr. Mark Wade, director of the Newark Department of Health and Community Wellness, told CBS News.

Starting Tuesday night, all non-essential businesses and indoor dining in Newark will shut down at 8 p.m. until at least November 10.

Meanwhile, on the vaccine front, drugmaker Pfizer announced Tuesday that it plans to apply for emergency-use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for its COVID-19 vaccine in November.

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Coronavirus live updates: COVID-19 positivity rates rising in 37 US states, analysis shows

The number of new cases of COVID-19 recorded across the United States has increased substantially, as has the number of new deaths from the disease, according to an internal memo from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that was obtained by ABC News on Monday night.

The memo, which is circulated among the highest levels of the federal government and is used to determine daily priorities for the agencies working on a COVID-19 response, said 40 U.S. states and territories are in an upward trajectory of new infections, while nine jurisdictions are at a plateau and seven others are in a downward trend.

There were 488,498 new cases confirmed during the period of Oct. 19-25, a 26% increase from the previous week. There were also 5,615 fatalities from COVID-19 recorded during the same period, a 15.1% increase compared with the week prior, according to the memo.

The national positivity rate for COVID-19 tests increased from 5.6% to 6.1% in week-to-week comparisons. Meanwhile, 22% of hospitals across the country have intensive care units that are more than 80% occupied. That figure is up from the summertime peak, when 17-18% of U.S. hospitals had 80% of ICU beds full, the memo said.

Arizona reported 848 COVID-19 hospitalizations on Oct. 21, its highest count since Aug. 26, according to the memo.

In the U.S. territory of Guam, which continues to be classified as a “red zone” for COVID-19 infections, an average of 89.7% of inpatient beds and 80.2% of ICU beds were occupied in the week ending Oct. 20, the memo said.

North Dakota saw a record high of 1,036 new cases on Oct. 20, surpassing the 1,000 mark of daily incident cases for the first time, according to the memo.

New Jersey reported 852 daily COVID-19 hospitalizations on Oct. 22, its highest since late July, the memo said.

Oklahoma reached a record 956 COVID-19 hospitalizations on Oct. 22. The previous record was set just two days earlier, according to the memo.

Utah reported an all-time high of 314 COVID-19 hospitalizations on Oct. 21, as several hospitals in the state reached capacity, the memo said.

ABC News’ Josh Margolin contributed to this report.

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Coronavirus cases break records as states around U.S. reel under surge

As the United States set records for the number of new coronavirus cases, states in every part of the country are reeling under the surge.

Two back-to-back daily records for single-day increases in U.S. cases were set on Friday, with 79,303 new cases, and on Thursday with 77,640, according to NBC News’ tally. The previous high of 75,723 was set July 29.

The total number of cases has reached 8.6 million, with over 225,000 deaths.

And the toll is being felt around the country.

  • Among the dead is an 18-year-old who was a student at University of Dayton in Ohio. “I think it is a wake-up call,” said a fellow student of the death of the teen, who had gone home to Illinois in September for remote study.

  • Illinois’ top public health official broke down in tears during a news conference Friday as she reported over 3,800 new coronavirus cases, bringing the state’s total to more than 370,000.

  • Ohio set another single-day case record after reporting 2,518 new cases Friday, bringing its total to 192,948, according to NBC News’ tally. “We can’t let this situation continue to domino out of control,” the governor said this week as the state put out a new ad with a visualization of how the virus spreads.

  • New Mexico has seen its cases double over the past two weeks to more than 40,000. “The threat of this virus remains very real”, the governor reminded residents.

  • South Dakota’s Pine Ridge Indian Reservation was put under a one-week lockdown by the Oglala Sioux Tribe to slow the spread of the virus.

  • Idaho is also experiencing an uptick in cases that is starting to overwhelm hospitals in the state. “Our hospital is not built for a pandemic,” said a pulmonologist at a hospital in Coeur d’Alene.

  • New Jersey’s governor said Saturday he extended a public health emergency in the state for an additional 30 days in light of an “alarming rise in cases,” the highest since May.

  • And the top health official in one of Florida’s most populous counties discouraged parents from hosting birthday parties for their children, no matter the size.

The University of Dayton student died Thursday after a lengthy hospitalization, the school’s president said in a letter to the university community, reported NBC affiliate WDTN in Dayton. The university didn’t say whether the student, who was in his first year, was believed to have contracted the virus at the school or elsewhere. He had left campus on Sept. 13 to study remotely from home.

In Illinois, the state’s top health official, Dr. Ngozi Ezike, became emotional at a news conference where she noted the increase in the case count and that over 9,400 people have died of the virus in the state. “These are people who started with us in 2020 and won’t be with us at the Thanksgiving table.”

“We are seeing the number of people with Covid-19 continue to increase,” Ezike said. “We are seeing the number of individuals in the

Illinois Health Official Breaks Down Crying While Giving Update on State’s Rising COVID-19 Deaths

Gov. JB Pritzker/Twitter

The Illinois Director of the Department of Public Health broke down in tears during Friday afternoon’s press briefing on the coronavirus in the state.

While updating the public on the state’s rising numbers of COVID-19 deaths, Dr. Ngozi Ezike took a moment to herself, turning away from the podium as she was unable to hold back her tears.

“Since yesterday we have lost an additional 31 lives, for a total of 9,418 deaths. These are people who started with us in 2020 and who won’t be with us at the Thanksgiving table,” she said. “Today, we are reporting 3,874 new cases, for a total of 364,033 confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic.”

“Excuse me, please,” Ezike said as she paused to compose herself before someone brought over a box of tissues. “I’m sorry.”

Gov. JB Pritzker/Twitter Dr. Ezike

RELATED: U.S. Breaks Record for Most COVID Cases in a Single Day with More Than 75,000 New Infections

As of Saturday, an additional 286 people have died, bringing the total to 9,704, according to a New York Times database.

During her speech, Ezike told Illinois residents that she understands “the mental, social and the emotional toll that this pandemic continues to have on people.”

“Not just because I’m asking people, it’s because I’m feeling it and living it myself. I don’t get to live in some COVID-free bubble, exempt from all the pain and tragedy of this pandemic. So I understand how pandemic fatigue is striking everyone. It’s real,” she said.

“The way we work, the way we live, the way we play has changed, and the harsh reality is that the sacrifices we’ve made, that we continue to make do not have a future expiration date,” Ezike added. “And I know that that’s difficult.”

Illinois has been experiencing a rising number of COVID-19 cases, reporting an average of 4,131 cases per day, an 81 percent increase from the average two weeks ago. As of Saturday, there have been at least 370,134 confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic.

“My message to you is to stay strong,” Ezike said. “I have never run a marathon but I have the utmost regard for those who have been able to train and plan and finish a marathon. But this is a difficult race when you can’t actually see the endpoint and I’m sorry that that’s the message I have for you. Nevertheless, I’m asking you to fight the fatigue. Fight the urge to give up on social distancing.”

Ezike added that residents need to continue wearing a mask, maybe reconsider attending large gatherings and continue to opt for virtual hang-outs.

RELATED: ‘Long Hauler’ COVID Patients Still Have Symptoms Months Later — and Most Are Women and the Elderly

“This is what we will have to do to bring the spread down in our community… Let’s please work together. I know many of you are healthy and don’t have a concern in the world of dying from

42 states, territories in upward trajectory of new COVID-19 cases: HHS memo

Only nine jurisdictions are improving. Just five jurisdictions are at a plateau.

Forty-two states and territories are in an upward trajectory of new COVID-19 cases, while only nine jurisdictions are improving, according to an internal Health and Human Services memo obtained by ABC News.

Just five jurisdictions are at a plateau.

There were 5,530 deaths recorded from Oct. 16 to Oct. 22, marking a 15.1% increase in new deaths compared with the previous week, according to the memo.

The national test-positivity rate increased from 5.1% to 5.9% in week-to-week comparisons.

Across the country, 24% of hospitals have more than 80% of their ICU beds filled. That number was 17 to 18% during the summertime peak.

In Florida, new cases are up 30% among high school students compared to two weeks ago, and up 42% among young adults ages 18 to 24, the memo said.

In Kentucky, new deaths have been increasing over the last two weeks. Kentucky reported its second-highest daily fatality count on Wednesday, the memo said.

The state is preparing its surge capacity as hospitalizations rise.

Mississippi reported a 26.2% increase in cases over the last week, according to HHS.

COVID-19 related hospitalizations in Mississippi are up 24% since last week, with COVID-19 ICU hospitalizations up 7%.

The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, who primarily live in Neshoba County, are disproportionately affected by the virus. The tribe reported 22 new cases this past week with

Coronavirus outbreaks connected to hockey are happening in New England states

Multiple New England states are experiencing issues with the coronavirus for hockey players, prompting suspensions in play.

Some states, including Massachusetts and New Hampshire, have paused ice skating and hockey activities for two weeks as facilities find ways to better prevent COVID-19 among people visiting and using the rinks.

Above video: Hockey parents speak out prior to mandatory COVID-19 testing announcement in New Hampshire

A rink is Vermont was linked to dozens of cases, and earlier this month, New Hampshire’s governor said over 150 cases in recent months were linked to hockey.


Hockey organizers and health experts in states have detailed ways to reduce risks in spreading the virus, stressing physical distancing and other measures. Materials typically cite Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

Health officials have also noted an adult recreational game being connected with the virus, saying it happened in Florida and led to around a dozen positive cases.

“The ice rink provides a venue that is likely well suited to COVID-19 transmission as an indoor environment where deep breathing occurs, and persons are in close proximity to one another,” a Florida health official said.

NH introduces testing requirement for players

A new requirement says rink staff, players and coaches must undergo a COVID-19 test before Nov. 6.

It comes as New Hampshire is “pausing” all hockey activities in indoor rinks for two weeks following positive COVID-19 tests for 158 people associated with the sport over the last two months, Gov. Chris Sununu and health officials said Oct. 15.

The suspension, which also affects ice skating in general, is in effect until Oct. 29. Play can resume Oct. 30, and the state’s reopening task force has provided guidance, which includes wearing face coverings when people are not playing.

Dr. Ben Chan, state epidemiologist, previously said the cases are from 23 different hockey-related New Hampshire organizations and teams, “and there are additional connections with out-of-state ice hockey organizations.”

Chan said people who have acquired the virus through hockey have been associated with, and potentially exposed others, in at least 24 different K-12 schools throughout the state.

“This type of spread and exposure to other facilities and organizations within the community increases the risk of introduction and spread of COVID-19 in other settings outside of hockey,” Chan said.

Rinks will be cleaned and sanitized and guidance on the sport will be revised and more testing will be conducted.

College team activity is on hold, in addition to youth and amateur organization activities.

“We don’t know exactly where the pinpoints are here, whether it’s something on the ice or something in the locker rooms,” Sununu said.

Indoor hockey, skating suspended for 2 weeks in Mass.

Suspended play comes as outbreaks have been linked to 108 confirmed or probable COVID-19 cases, according to the Massachusetts health department.

Indoor ice hockey and skating have been suspended as of 5 p.m. Oct. 23, to at least Nov. 7 for youth hockey and adult leagues at both public and private facilities.

“This order is