Tag: Mental

 

Fort Bend ISD’s complex scheduling process weakens mental health support for students, officials say

Fort Bend ISD officials say using separate schedules for virtual and on-campus classes offer increased learning opportunities that allow online students to return to campus for band or football and other extracurricular classes.

However, maintaining the complicated system means campus counselors now spend all their time “hand scheduling” classes for the district’s more than 76,000 students. That leaves teachers as the sole mental health support for students, administrators said during a school board meeting Monday, Oct. 19.

When questioned as to what kind of mental health support was available for teachers facing an exponential increase in their work load and stress level, administrators recommended deep-breathing exercises, among other things.

“We have wellness moments that we use to open every meeting,” Assistant Superintendent Diana Sayavedra said. “We employ breathing exercises. We communicate the importance of self-wellness and finding the balance between work and home and our ‘Live Well’ (cell phone) app constantly sends reminders and updates to our employees about was they can do to reduce stress.”

One trustee spoke up to question the approach.


“Not to discount breathing, but it reminds me of what they told me when I was in labor, ‘Just breathe through it,’” trustee Kristin Tassin said. “And that doesn’t always cut it.”

Sayavedra said she and other administrators are also currently evaluating ways to possibly offload some teacher duties to other district staffers in the future.

Trustee Grayle James said she had received a lot of messages from teachers who were feeling overwhelmed and asked if a schedule change to allow teachers some extra down time was a possibility.

Superintendent Charles Dupre said he and his staff would consider it, adding he’d also heard from many teachers struggling with stress and anxiety.

“My consistent message to teachers is to ask the teachers to give themselves grace,” Dupre said. “Because when I talk to teachers and I get the largest outcry from teachers, it’s often teachers who’ve set a very high bar for themselves that they’re unwilling to lower.”

The decision to implement separate schedules for on-campus classes and virtual learning continued to be a source of concern for administrators and trustees during Monday’s meeting. The process requires campus counselors to evaluate each student’s schedule individually and resolve various conflicts between the dual scheduling system such as monitoring class sizes and making adjustments for students with overlapping classes.

The process has been so time-consuming campus counselors have no time for their regular mental health support duties, leaving teachers as the sole support for students. The scheduling process is expected to continue to drain resources from mental health support systems in the coming months as new schedules are drawn for the upcoming semester, according to Pilar Westbrook, who serves as Fort Bend ISD’s Executive Director of Social Emotional Learning and Comprehensive Health.

“We know that our counselors are our tier-one for mental health support, but we won’t acknowledge the fact that they have been inundated with

Nearly 8 in 10 report pandemic is causing mental health strain, poll shows

COVID-19, health care, the economy, systemic racism and the presidential election are a threat to the nation’s mental health, according to an American Psychological Association poll.

Seventy-eight percent of adults polled said the pandemic is causing major stress and 60% called the array of issues facing the country overwhelming.

And younger adults are really struggling, the poll revealed.
Respondents from Generation Z — those born since 1996 — pegged their stress level in the past month at a 6 on 10-point scale in which 1 represented “little to no stress” and 10 was “a great deal of stress.” That compared with an average stress level of 5 among all adults.

Nineteen percent of adults said their mental health is worse than it was a year ago.

That included 34% of Gen Z adults, 19% of millennials, who were born between 1977 and 1995, 21% of Gen Xers, who were born between 1965 and 1976, 12% of baby boomers, who were born between 1946 and 1964, and 8% of those born before 1946.

Gen Z adults were the most likely to report common signs of depression.
More than 7 in 10 said that in the last two weeks they were so tired that they sat around and did nothing, felt very restless, found it hard to think or concentrate, felt lonely, or felt miserable or unhappy.

“This survey confirms what many mental health experts have been saying since the start of the pandemic: Our mental health is suffering from the compounding stressors in our lives,” said Arthur Evans Jr., chief executive officer of the APA.
“This compounding stress will have serious health and social consequences if we don’t act now to reduce it,” he said in an association news release.

Evans noted that the youngest Americans are showing signs of serious mental health issues, including depression and anxiety.

The poll found that changes to school are a big stressor for Gen Zers. More than 8 of 10 teens said they have had negative impacts of school closures, and 51% said planning for the future seems impossible.

Among college students, 67% feel the same way about planning for the future. And 87% of Gen Z members in college said school is a significant source of stress.

“Loneliness and uncertainly about the future are major stressors for adolescents and young adults, who are striving to find their places in the world, both socially, and in terms of education and work. The pandemic and its economic consequences are upending youths’ social lives and their visions for their futures,” said survey researcher Emma Adam, a professor of education and social policy at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Adam said public policy must address this generation’s need for social, emotional and mental health supports as well as financial assistance and educational and work opportunities. “Both comfort now and hope for the future are essential for the long-term well-being of this generation,” she said.

But most Americans aren’t getting the support they need. Among adults, 61% said

Pandemic Putting Americans Under Great Mental Strain: Poll | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) — COVID-19, health care, the economy, systemic racism and the presidential election are a threat to the nation’s mental health, according to an American Psychological Association (APA) poll.

Seventy-eight percent of adults polled said the pandemic is causing major stress and 60% called the array of issues facing the country overwhelming.

And younger adults are really struggling, the poll revealed.

Respondents from Generation Z (those born since 1996), pegged their stress level in the past month at a 6 on 10-point scale in which 1 represented “little to no stress” and 10 was “a great deal of stress.” That compared with an average stress level of 5 among all adults.

Nineteen percent of adults said their mental health is worse than it was a year ago.

That included 34% of Gen Z adults; 19% of millennials (born 1977-1995); 21% of Gen Xers (born 1965-1976); 12% of baby boomers (born 1946-1964); and 8% of those born before 1946.

Gen Z adults were the most likely to report common signs of depression.

More than 7 in 10 said that in the last two weeks they were so tired that they sat around and did nothing, felt very restless, found it hard to think or concentrate, felt lonely, or felt miserable or unhappy.

“This survey confirms what many mental health experts have been saying since the start of the pandemic: Our mental health is suffering from the compounding stressors in our lives,” said Arthur Evans Jr., chief executive officer of the APA.

“This compounding stress will have serious health and social consequences if we don’t act now to reduce it,” he said in an association news release.

Evans noted that the youngest Americans are showing signs of serious mental health issues, including depression and anxiety.

The poll found that changes to school are a big stressor for Gen Zers. More than 8 of 10 teens said they have had negative impacts of school closures, and 51% said planning for the future seems impossible.

Among college students, 67% feel the same way about planning for the future. And 87% of Gen Z members in college said school is a significant source of stress.

“Loneliness and uncertainly about the future are major stressors for adolescents and young adults, who are striving to find their places in the world, both socially, and in terms of education and work. The pandemic and its economic consequences are upending youths’ social lives and their visions for their futures,” said survey researcher Emma Adam, a professor of education and social policy at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Adam said public policy must address this generation’s need for social, emotional and mental health supports as well as financial assistance and educational and work opportunities. “Both comfort now and hope for the future are essential for the long-term well-being of this generation,” she said.

But most Americans aren’t getting the support they need. Among adults, 61% said they could use

Ehave Expands Its Psychedelic Mental Health Platform with Medchart, a Leader in Medical Record Software, as a Plugin to the Ehave Dashboard

Ehave partners with world-renowned tech platform, Medchart. The Medchart plugin will allow medical professionals using the Ehave Dashboard to easily transfer medical records, while allowing patients to own their own data and do what they want with it.

MIAMI, Oct. 20, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ehave, Inc. (OTC Pink: EHVVF) (the “Company”), a provider of digital therapeutics delivering evidence-based therapeutic interventions to healthcare patients, announced today it has added Medchart, the only comprehensive solution for medical record exchange, as the first plugin to its Ehave Dashboard. This will not only allow patients to take more control over their psychedelic medical records, it will allow patients to access innovative treatments to mental health by providing clinicians and pharmaceutical companies with data that will make the provision of care more readily available. The combination of Medchart with the Ehave Dashboard will help provide a dataset that can be used to clinically validate some of these more experimental forms of therapy including psychedelics and ketamine treatment.

Personal Health Records (PHR) are a patient’s individualized collection of their health records. By allowing patients to own their own records, medical professionals and psychedelic researchers can begin working with patients to create biomarkers on the how they can live a longer healthier life, as well as what treatments are effective. Giving data to the PHR helps doctors who can prescribe medicine based on your data. As you add sensors into the dashboard you can add more data in your PHR. There are 11 million Americans who are resistant to most mental health therapies, and they can cost the healthcare system as much as $250 billion. Since major pharmaceutical companies don’t develop drugs for them, the Ehave Dashboard could potentially aggregate data from this patient population and provide that data to drug developers for clinical trials. This data could also help insurers route patients to the treatment providers who can help them the most.

Toronto-based Medchart, which enables the electronic transfer of medical records through express patient consent, simplifies the request of health information for patients. Medchart digitizes the exchange of health information between healthcare providers, attorneys, insurers, payers, researchers and patients while improving transfer speed, data quality, and business insights through artificial intelligence and machine learning. The company provides cloud based medical record solutions across North America with purpose-built solutions for personal injury and mass tort attorneys in the United States. Medchart complies with all federal and provincial privacy legislation including HIPAA, PIPEDA, PHIPA, PIPA, PHIA, HIA, and more.

The Ehave Dashboard is a data driven platform that has been strategically developed to provide better communication among medical practitioners and health care providers. The aggregation of data and information into one application has proven effective in streamlining the health process for both patients and providers. The Ehave Dashboard has been developed through years of testing with mental healthcare professionals at one of Canada’s largest hospitals, The Hospital for Sick Children in Ontario. In addition to providing better outcomes, the proprietary platform allows individuals to

Sidra Medicine highlights mental health services for children, young people and perinatal women

Sidra Medicine, has partnered with the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) in its national mental health and wellness campaign “Are you ok” to highlight the support services available for women, children and young people in Qatar.

Professor. Muhammed Waqar Azeem, the Chair of Psychiatry at Sidra Medicine said, “The pandemic has changed the landscape regarding the critical need for robust mental health support systems.  It is very assuring and speaks to the caliber of the healthcare services in Qatar, to see how the Ministry of Public Health and Sidra Medicine have rapidly mobilized to keep mental health on top of the country’s service agenda. At Sidra Medicine, we remain committed to supporting the people of Qatar, particularly children, young people and perinatal women in meeting their mental health care needs. In addition to world class mental health services, our Department of Psychiatry has started a number of educational and training programs and is also involved in various leading-edge mental health related research projects.”

Sidra Medicine, a QF entity, offers Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Adolescent Medicine and Perinatal Mental Health services in Qatar. The services are either referral based (in the case of children) or self-referral/ direct (perinatal mental health services).

Sidra Medicine’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) is available for children ages five to eighteen (5-18) years and includes outpatient, inpatient, consultation liaison and emergency care.  The service can be accessed via referral from Primary Health Care Centers, private clinics, schools and other sources.

Dr. Ahsan Nazeer, Division Chief of CAHMS at Sidra Medicine said: “As part of our ongoing efforts to strengthen mental health support services, we have focused on patient care, education to build local human resources, research and building community models of care in Qatar.  The success of our program is based on the collaboration of patients, their relatives and our staff, who all work to help achieve patient goals to live their lives as fully possible. I am also proud of our team’s achieving accreditation for the world’s first Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education International (ACGMEI).”

“Our advice to parents dealing with children with anxiety, especially during this time, is to encourage their children to share their concerns and have frank and open discussions about their fears and concerns.  It is also important that children obtain accurate information from reliable sources.

We also encourage parents to focus on instilling a sense of hope and optimism in their children by role modelling appropriate positive behaviours,” continued Dr. Nazeer.

Dr. Alanoud Al Ansari, Division Chief of Adolescent Medicine whose clinic provides developmentally appropriate mental health and medical care for adolescents aged 12 to 18 years old, has seen a rise in anxiety in teenagers.

“Teenagers are manifesting their anxiety around loss of control and unpredictability through eating disorders, depression and cutting. Many of them have not been able to cope being back at school. Despite families being in lock down and opting to stay home during the

Taking Care Of Newborns Can Do Wonders To Dads’ Mental Health, Study Finds

KEY POINTS

  • Fathers play an important role in their baby’s lives
  • Caring for their babies also benefit their mental health
  • Dads who are involved in caring for newborns are happier in the long run

The working world recognizes the role of mothers in taking care of their newborn babies, which is why they enjoy paid parental leave. However, a recent study shows that fathers may need it as much as mothers do as dads’ involvement in baby’s development proves beneficial for the entire family. 

A study published in the Frontiers of Psychiatry entitled, “Father Involvement in Infant Parenting in an Ethnically Diverse Community Sample: Predicting Paternal Depressive Symptoms,” showed that early paternal involvement in caring for the infant benefits both the child and the mother, and possibly for the mental health of the fathers. 

The researchers interviewed 881 low-income and racially-diverse fathers. They found three factors, which predicted why a number of fathers during the first year of their child showed lower rates of depression, or simply put, were happier. These three factors include the time that they spent with their newborns, whether they were able to do basic infant care routines like feeding newborns and changing their diapers, and of course, if they were able to provide material support to their babies. Fathers who were able to do all these three were found to be happier on the overall.

Dr. Olajide Bamishigbin, Jr., lead author of the study and California State University’s assistant professor of psychology, said that more involvement of fathers with their babies eventually improves the life of the entire family. The mental health of fathers who were involved with caring for their infants in the early stages of life was far better in the long run.

Father and baby Father and baby Photo: PublicDomainPictures/Pixabay

Bamishigbin and the team used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, a tool used to identify postpartum depression in women, to also assess the depression symptoms of fathers. The period of assessment was done at three intervals during the first year after birth, particularly the first month, the sixth month, and lastly, in the 12th month.

The researchers noted that fathers who were able to spend more time with their babies showed better parenting self-efficacy. They also provided more support in terms of the material needs of the baby. When the child reached a year old, these fathers also had lower depressive symptoms. 

On the overall, the study suggests that the involvement of fathers is an important predictor of their mental health. The researchers noted that paternal presence a month after birth plays an important role in the father’s mental help even if the father was not living with nor married to the mother of the baby. They hope that their study could help move the needle on paid parental leave.

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Will Canceling Thanksgiving Cause A Mental Health Crisis? People May Feel Isolated, Lonely, Defeated

KEY POINTS

  • U.S. coronavirus infections are increasing by tens of thousands a day and the death toll is nearing 220,000
  • Dr. Anthony Fauci says Americans should “bite the bullet” and cancel this year’s gatherings
  • Mental health experts warn being deprived of Thanksgiving gatherings could increase feelings of loneliness and isolation

Last Thanksgiving people worried about how to prevent political blow-ups around the dinner table and whether the surly uncle would behave. In 2020, they’re worrying about whether to put on a Thanksgiving dinner at all with coronavirus cases increasing across the country.

Thanksgiving is Americans’ second favorite holiday behind Christmas. Unlike Christmas and Easter, there are no religious overtones. Unlike Memorial Day, the Fourth of July and Labor Day, it’s not associated with politics.

But this year, fears of infecting loved ones has would-be hosts worrying about what to do.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns the more people who are invited, the greater the risk of spreading the disease that has killed about 220,000 Americans since March – especially if those gatherings are held indoors. Infections have been rising by the tens of thousands a day.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, says people should just cancel the annual celebration.

“You may have to bite the bullet and sacrifice that social gathering, unless you’re pretty certain that the people that you’re dealing with are not infected,” he said in a CBS interview.

Taking that step, however, likely will be hard on a lot of people, psychologist Souzan Swift of Heal telemedicine practice told International Business Times.

“Family and friends look forward to coming together to celebrate so now that we are unable to do so, it’s going to leave a lot of people feeling more isolated and lonely,” Swift said. “It’s not just about the holiday but about coming together, socializing, connecting with our loved ones, and overall self-care. Having to cancel our plans and/or traditions takes a lot of that away and we are left feeling lonely and disconnected from the world we knew.”

Addiction Treatment Services at Phoenix Behavioral Health recommends hosting virtual events if in-person gatherings are off the table.

“Those who may have a mental health disorder will be able to maintain the connections they crave while also lowering their risk of contracting COVID-19,” said Olivia Feldman, project manager at Addiction Treatment Services, citing the increased danger of turning to drugs or alcohol to assuage the isolation and loneliness.

Swift said canceling Thanksgiving, and potentially other winter holidays, may leave people feeling discouraged and defeated. Adjusting to a “new normal” is tough, she said.

“Unfortunately, the merriment we crave — eating, drinking and singing together in a cozy room — are among the highest-risk scenarios for transmitting COVID-19,” M. Kit Delgado, an assistant professor of emergency medicine and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania, told MarketWatch.

In his CBS interview, Fauci noted his children had canceled his family gathering “because of their concern for me and my age … even

Sean Hannity Attacks Joe Biden’s Mental Fitness Despite Tucker Carlson Previously Saying Tactic Won’t Work

Sean Hannity has attacked Joe Biden’s mental fitness just two weeks after Tucker Carlson said that this tactic was a “mistake” and would not help Donald Trump beat Joe Biden in the election.

Hannity laid into Biden on his Monday night Fox News broadcast for briefly forgetting Sen. Mitt Romney’s name as well as for a recent incident where Biden mistakingly said he was running for senate, not president.

“Maybe somebody on the staff might want to remind the ever forgetful Joe that he is running for president. He’s not running for senator,” Hannity said. “He keeps forgetting, forgets the day of the week, forgets what office he’s running for. He is running for president, not senator. Somebody remind him!”

He went on to say: “He is obviously not capable of leading. He has been hiding the entire campaign, and the corrupt media mob is covering for him.”

However, Hannity may have not gotten the memo, as two weeks ago, Carlson said “it was a mistake to spend so much time focusing on Joe Biden’s mental decline.”

Sean Hannity
Sean Hannity is pictured at Del Frisco’s Grille on April 2, 2018 in New York City. He has said on his show that he believes some parts of the U.S. should end the lockdown in place due to the coronavirus.
Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Carlson said the Trump administration’s attempts to paint Biden as “senile” or suffering from dementia are the wrong tactic and even conceded that the 77-year-old Democrat came across well at the debate.

“Trump isn’t going to win this race by calling Joe Biden senile,” Carlson said. “Nor, by the way, is Joe Biden going to win this race by calling Donald Trump a racist, as he repeatedly did last night. That slander didn’t work four years ago. It will not work now. Because personal attacks rarely work, they rarely determine election outcomes. That’s obvious if you look at the results, but it’s easy to forget it—and many did.”

“As a political matter, the main thing we learned last night is that it was a mistake to spend so much time focusing on Joe Biden’s mental decline,” Carlson said on September 30. “Yes, it’s real. Yes, Joe Biden is fading, we’ve showed you dozens of examples of it for months now.

“But on stage last night, Biden did not seem senile,” he continued. “If you tuned in expecting him to forget his own name—and honestly, we did expect that—you may have been surprised by how precise some of his answers were. Not all of them, but enough of them. Trump isn’t going to win this race by calling Joe Biden senile.”

Another person who seems to have not gotten the memo either is Donald Trump himself.

This morning, the President took aim at his opponent’s mental stability once again in a tweet lambasting Biden for mistakingly saying he was running for senate.

3 Mental Health Benefits That Come With Learning Self Defense

Learning self defense is not just about the physical benefits that you can get. Yes, there are some great physical things that will change within your body, but you should focus on more than just that. In fact, there are several mental health benefits that will come with learning martial arts, self defense, and fighting in any capacity. If you have never thought about this, perhaps the following will guide you to understanding the importance of learning the steps necessary to defend yourself, and others.

The Confidence Boost

Regardless of which martial art you want to learn, regardless of the classes that you take, you will gain confidence. People that know how to defend themselves don't walk around scared. They know that if something comes at them, they can calmly disarm, and avoid being beaten. Now, that doesn't mean that self defense is going to protect you from bullets in a gun fight, but it can give you confidence to move forward when others are in a panic. Staying calm when nefarious characters are trying to hurt you is tough, but when you know that you have skills to defend yourself, you will see things differently. While everyone else panics around you, imagine going through slow motion, and being able to fight back with relative ease.

Learn To Manage Stress

Alongside the benefit of staying calm, and getting a boost in your confidence, self defense classes can help you manage stress. Regardless of which option you decide to learn, martial arts are famous for teaching how to manage stress in all situations. There's nothing more stressful than being attacked, or dealing with a situation where you have to use your fists and feet as weapons. When those things occur, you can either panic or you can be calm. Managing stress doesn't just factor into the moments where you need to fight, but rather bleeds into your work life, home life, and relationships. Reducing stress, fighting depression, improving mental health, and assisting your daily routine are all benefits that come with this type of learning process.

Fighting Depression and Other Mental Health Disorders

Learning martial arts does not replace having to use antidepressants, or any other medications. That is not what this means. However, research studies have shown that individuals that train in self defense classes, manage mental health disorders a bit easier. In some instances, individuals were able to reduce or completely replace their medications as a result of improvements in their self-esteem, and mental health. Now, this does not mean that every single person will get this benefit, but there are some that do in fact get those results over time. One thing is for certain in this benefit, those that study martial arts, and learn how to defend themselves, improve their mental health over time, since it's a life-long process of learning.

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Mental Health – Depression

The early stage of depression is very important. Most people quietly suffer depression and are never diagnosed, while some treat themselves without them knowing by adjusting to nature and exploring their chances of hope.

We all feel depressed sometimes but get well over time. After all, being sad is a part of living, we can't all have it good all the time.

Depression is an illness that affects both the mental state and mind. It affects the way you feel and think, increasing your thought of hopelessness and sadness.

The majority of people will suffer from depression at least once in their lifetime, this could be from grief, stress or illness which can lead from mild depression to severe depression.

What causes depression:
Research shows that the brain plays an important role regulating our mood, this could have a major impact on depression, but some factors contribute, including change in hormones, where the body cannot manage stress and experience positives mood.

Who can have depression:
Depression can happen to anyone at any age, depression is an illness of mental state. Appropriate therapy for mood swings in children and teenagers will reduce the chances of having depression.

Symptoms of depression:
o Inability to think or concentrate
o Hopelessness
o Inability to make decisions
o Guilt
o Changes in sleep
o Loss of interest
o Loss of energy
o Sadness
o Suicidal thoughts
o Weight gain

Unfortunately Depression is common and a serious illness. Immediate help or treatment is advisable.

The majority of people will suffer from depression at least once in their lifetime.

Cure for depression:
As depression is an illness of the mental health, there are many ways symptoms can be cured
o Antidepressant: It's a popular treatment for depression. There are over 30 types of antidepressants tablets, if one does not relieve your symptoms, you can always try another one and chances are you will find one that works well for you.
o Exercise: it's one of the natural ways of reducing the symptoms of depression and there is evidence that it helps in improving your motivation and mood.
o Religion: This is the most common and natural way of totally curing depression. Majority of people choose religions as their choice of depression treatment. Most religion preaches faith that gives hope to believers, even though religion can bring guilt of past troubles, after all memories are the only treasure that cannot be changed but remembering the hope of forgiveness elevates the mood and mental state.

Research shows that 90% of people suffering from depression in Africa are not diagnosed. Are you suffering from depression, or do you know anyone suffering from depression? Talk to someone today, it helps. Talk to us today.

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