Tag: men

 

Women in medicine make about $116,000 less than men, and the pandemic could be making things worse



a person holding a baby: HRAUN/Getty Images


© HRAUN/Getty Images
HRAUN/Getty Images

  • Medical networking site Doximity released its fourth annual Physician Compensation Report on Thursday.
  • In addition to compensation differences across US cities, the report highlights that women make less than men in all medical specialties. 
  • According to the report, the wage gap is largest for otolaryngology — or the specialty related to ears, noses, and throats — where women make 77.9% of men or a gap of 22.1%.
  • Overall, the gender wage gap in 2020 for doctors is 28%, about three percentage points higher than last year’s report.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus recession has disproportionately hurt working women, and the pressures of balancing work with parenting and household responsibilities amid the pandemic have also affected female doctors.

Medical networking site Doximity just released its fourth annual Physician Compensation Report, and one of the main findings is that the gender wage gap for doctors has widened this year.

The report describes compensation for physicians in various US cities and in different medical specialties. The figures are based on self-reported compensation surveys from 2019 and 2020 that were completed by around 44,000 US physicians.

One notable finding is the various gender wage gaps among medical specialties. Last year’s report showed a declining gap in pay between male and female physicians. However, this year the overall wage gap was 28%, 2.8 percentage points higher than last year’s figure. Women in medicine made about $116,000 less than men, where women make an average salary of around $299,000 compared to the average salary among male doctors of about $415,000. 

“It’s likely that the widening gender pay gap represents another financial consequence of the pandemic. This is a troubling trend economists have previously reported on in other industry sectors,” the company wrote in the report. 

The latest report shows that the pandemic’s effects on working women extends to healthcare, even though the industry is considered essential during the pandemic.  

“What we are thinking is that women have more responsibilities at home and therefore have had to cut back on their hours,” Dr. Peter Alperin, vice president at Doximity, told Business Insider. He also said that overall there’s been a slowing of increases in compensation this year which has especially affected compensation for women in the medical field.

Overall 865,000 women left the workforce in September alone. That is about four times higher than the number of men who dropped out of the workforce that month. NPR reports that more demand within households may be contributing to this large decline of women in the workplace. 

The following chart highlights the medical specialties with the largest gender wage gaps, according to the Doximity report. Otolaryngology, or treating ear, nose, and throat issues, has the largest gap. Women make 77.9% of men’s average annual salaries or is a wage gap of 22.1%. Women in this medical specialty make around $109,000 less than men.  

The following chart highlights the medical specialties with the smallest wage gaps, based on the report.

The Most Influential Men in Fitness: Track Mafia’s Cory Wharton-Malcolm

Track Mafia isn’t a running club – it’s a community. “People don’t just come for the exercise. They come for friendship,” says founder Cory Wharton-Malcolm, “Beefy” to his friends and followers. “At Track Mafia, you’ll meet chefs, illustrators, hospital workers, CEOs, TfL workers… Everyone has a common purpose.” On Thursday nights at Paddington Rec’s athletics track, there is no hierarchy. It’s free, and novices train alongside pros.



a man wearing sunglasses: “Beefy” as he's better known talks about how he went from barely being able to jog to head coach (and voice) for the Nike Run Club app


© Provided by Men’s Health UK
“Beefy” as he’s better known talks about how he went from barely being able to jog to head coach (and voice) for the Nike Run Club app

Groups such as Track Mafia and Run Dem Crew, for which Wharton-Malcolm has also worked, have changed the face of recreational running. It’s been said that the sport attracts a narrow demographic – slim, middle class, white. These crews are the antidote: a home for those who don’t fit the profile, but take their running no less seriously.

When Wharton-Malcolm took up running in preparation for joining the 2007 London Marathon, he could barely jog to the bottom of his road without gassing out. “My friends laughed and said, ‘You’re fat, you smoke, you eat kebabs. How do you plan to do this?’”

They’re probably not laughing now. Today, as well as fronting Track Mafia, Wharton-Malcolm is a head coach (and voice) for the Nike Run Club app, which during lockdown became the fourth most popular app in the UK. He has acted as a speaker in parliament and Buckingham Palace, talking about how sports can be used to engage young people, strengthen communities and reduce antisocial behaviour.

Championing inclusivity remains his MO, including opening up new pathways into top-tier jobs. “I think a lot of organisations feel, ‘If this person wasn’t taught the way I was taught, then they’re not for us. We’ll have to spend too much time showing them how to do things our way.’ But don’t you want to learn how to do things their way, too?”

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The Most Influential Men in Fitness: Gymshark’s Ben Francis

ben francis gymshark

Noma Bar

“Fuck standing on the sideline. Fuck injustice. Fuck racism.” Where some brands virtue-signalled vaguely in the wake of George Floyd’s murder, Gymshark spoke out, donating $125,000 to Black Lives Matter and committing to driving change via its channels.

A “red thread” of community runs through the UK sportswear company, says founder Ben Francis, fresh of face at 28. “We’re super-inclusive, super-caring, super-transparent.” And unlike the older, clunkier competitors that it’s circling, the spandex predator is “extremely agile”. At the start of lockdown, it deftly changed its social media handles to “Homeshark” to remind its fam that: “This ain’t no joke.”

That nimbleness is despite Britain’s fastest-growing fashion label swelling into a £500m megalodon based in Solihull in just eight years. The 500-plus staff also has outposts in Denver, Hong Kong and Mauritius. With no high-street stores, traditional advertising or outside investment, social media has turbo-charged the expansion of Gymshark, which Francis started in his parents’ garage when he was 19, while studying business and management at Aston University by day and working at Pizza Hut by night.

“I wish I could tell you that it was this master plan,” says Francis. As a 16-year-old, he was inspired to join a gym by fitness YouTubers. So, when he and friends began hand-sewing and screen-printing their own clothing, more tapered than traditional bodybuilder apparel, sending samples to their online idols seemed only fitting.

Francis has a big vision, too: “I want us to create the greatest community, and I want us to be the greatest fitness brand on the planet.”

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Vital Long Sleeve T-shirt

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Crest Joggers

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Why the coronavirus is killing more men than women

By mid-October, the coronavirus had killed almost 17,000 more American men than women, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For every 10 women claimed by the disease in the United States, 12 men have died, found an analysis by Global Health 50/50, a U.K.-based initiative to advance gender equality in health care.

That disparity was one of many alarming aspects of the new virus. It bewildered those unfamiliar with the role of gender in disease.

But the specialized group of researchers who study that relationship was not surprised. It prepared an array of hypotheses. One possible culprit was male behavior. Perhaps men were more likely to be exposed to the virus due to social factors; a disproportionately male workforce, for instance, could place more men in contact with infected people. Or men’s lungs might be more vulnerable because they were more likely to smoke in the earliest countries to report the differences.

What has become more evident, 10 months into this outbreak, is that men show comparatively weaker immune responses to coronavirus infections, which may account for those added deaths.

“If you look at the data across the world, there are as many men as women that are infected. It’s just the severity of disease that is stronger in most populations in men,” Franck Mauvais-Jarvis, a Tulane University physician who studies gender differences in such diseases as diabetes. In such cases, biology can help explain why.

Women generally have stronger immune systems, thanks to sex hormones, as well as chromosomes packed with immune-related genes. About 60 genes on the X chromosome are involved in immune function, Johns Hopkins University microbiologist Sabra Klein told The Washington Post in April. People with two X chromosomes can benefit from the double helping of some of those genes.

Akiko Iwasaki, who studies immune defenses against viruses at Yale University, wanted to see how sex differences might play out in coronavirus infections. She and her colleagues cast a proverbial net into the immune system to fish out schools of microscopic fighters.

“We did a holistic look at everything we can measure immunologically,” Iwasaki said, listing a litany of the molecules and cells that form the body’s bulwark against pathogens: “cytokines, chemokines, T cells, B cells, neutrophils. Everything that we had access to.”

In male patients, the T-cell response was weaker, the scientists found. Not only do T cells detect infected cells and kill them, they also help direct the antibody response. “It’s like a master regulator of immune response. And when you have a drop in T cells, or in their ability to become activated, you basically lose the conductor of an orchestra,” Iwasaki said.

The power of the immune system wanes as people age, regardless of sex. But what is a gentle decline for women is an abrupt dive off a cliff for men: Iwasaki’s work indicates the T-cell response of men in their 30s and 40s is equivalent to that of a woman in her 90s.

And T