Tag: medical

 

Ehave Expands Its Psychedelic Mental Health Platform with Medchart, a Leader in Medical Record Software, as a Plugin to the Ehave Dashboard

Ehave partners with world-renowned tech platform, Medchart. The Medchart plugin will allow medical professionals using the Ehave Dashboard to easily transfer medical records, while allowing patients to own their own data and do what they want with it.

MIAMI, Oct. 20, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ehave, Inc. (OTC Pink: EHVVF) (the “Company”), a provider of digital therapeutics delivering evidence-based therapeutic interventions to healthcare patients, announced today it has added Medchart, the only comprehensive solution for medical record exchange, as the first plugin to its Ehave Dashboard. This will not only allow patients to take more control over their psychedelic medical records, it will allow patients to access innovative treatments to mental health by providing clinicians and pharmaceutical companies with data that will make the provision of care more readily available. The combination of Medchart with the Ehave Dashboard will help provide a dataset that can be used to clinically validate some of these more experimental forms of therapy including psychedelics and ketamine treatment.

Personal Health Records (PHR) are a patient’s individualized collection of their health records. By allowing patients to own their own records, medical professionals and psychedelic researchers can begin working with patients to create biomarkers on the how they can live a longer healthier life, as well as what treatments are effective. Giving data to the PHR helps doctors who can prescribe medicine based on your data. As you add sensors into the dashboard you can add more data in your PHR. There are 11 million Americans who are resistant to most mental health therapies, and they can cost the healthcare system as much as $250 billion. Since major pharmaceutical companies don’t develop drugs for them, the Ehave Dashboard could potentially aggregate data from this patient population and provide that data to drug developers for clinical trials. This data could also help insurers route patients to the treatment providers who can help them the most.

Toronto-based Medchart, which enables the electronic transfer of medical records through express patient consent, simplifies the request of health information for patients. Medchart digitizes the exchange of health information between healthcare providers, attorneys, insurers, payers, researchers and patients while improving transfer speed, data quality, and business insights through artificial intelligence and machine learning. The company provides cloud based medical record solutions across North America with purpose-built solutions for personal injury and mass tort attorneys in the United States. Medchart complies with all federal and provincial privacy legislation including HIPAA, PIPEDA, PHIPA, PIPA, PHIA, HIA, and more.

The Ehave Dashboard is a data driven platform that has been strategically developed to provide better communication among medical practitioners and health care providers. The aggregation of data and information into one application has proven effective in streamlining the health process for both patients and providers. The Ehave Dashboard has been developed through years of testing with mental healthcare professionals at one of Canada’s largest hospitals, The Hospital for Sick Children in Ontario. In addition to providing better outcomes, the proprietary platform allows individuals to

How Fetal Cells From The 1970s Power Medical Innovation Today

It is no secret that thousands of laboratories around the world use cells derived from a fetus that was aborted decades ago to develop vital medicines.

But it is a contentious topic in the US, where conservatives and anti-abortion activists have long deemed the practice unethical.

The matter is once more under the spotlight after President Donald Trump was treated for Covid-19 using Regeneron’s antibody treatment. The company used aborted fetal cells as part of its testing process.

“It’s becoming annoying,” Andrea Gambotto, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh, said of the controversy.

Gambotto has used a cell line called HEK 293, the same used by Regeneron, as part of his research for 25 years.

“It’d be a crime to ban the use of these cells,” he added. “It never harmed anybody — it was a dead embryo so the cells back then (were used), instead of being discarded, they were used for research.”

The big advantage of these cells, which were developed in the early 1970s, is that they now represent a “gold standard” in the pharmaceutical industry.

If Gambotto — who is leading a Covid-19 vaccine research project himself — one day succeeds, his vaccine can be produced anywhere in the world, thanks to HEK293.

“You can go to India and make a vaccine for all the world,” he said. To those who call for the development of alternatives, he says, “You don’t need to go back 30 years and reinvent the wheel.”

The original cells were transformed and immortalized in January 1973 by a young Canadian postdoc by the name of Frank Graham, who was working at the time in Leiden, the Netherlands in the laboratory of Professor Alex van der Eb.

Vials of the Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine, which was developed using aborted fetal tissue Vials of the Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine, which was developed using aborted fetal tissue Photo: AFP / Vincenzo PINTO

Normally, a cell has a finite number of divisions, but Graham managed to modify these cells so that they divide ad infinitum.

This was his 293rd experiment, hence the name of the line (HEK stands for “human embryonic kidney cells”).

“Use of fetal tissue was not uncommon in that period,” Graham, a professor emeritus at Canada’s McMaster University who now lives in Italy, told AFP.

“Abortion was illegal in the Netherlands until 1984 except to save the life of the mother. Consequently I have always assumed that the HEK cells used by the Leiden lab must have derived from a therapeutic abortion.”

Vaccine developers like HEK293 because the cells are malleable and transformable into virus mini-factories. To grow viruses, you always need a host cell. It can be a chicken egg, but human cells are preferable in human medicine.

In the case of Covid-19 vaccines, several makers have used HEK293 to generate what are called “viral vectors.”

These are weakened versions of common cold-causing adenoviruses that are loaded with the genetic instructions for human cells to manufacture a surface protein of the coronavirus. This elicits an immune response that the body remembers when it encounters

CDC criticizes White House medical adviser’s discredited mask claim

WASHINGTON — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is criticizing a top White House coronavirus adviser for spreading misinformation about facial coverings, in a potential escalation of the feud between the administration and public health officials within the federal government. 

That adviser, Stanford neuroradiologist Dr. Scott Atlas, appears to have taken a statistic from a CDC study wildly out of context to pose an anti-mask argument that has been central to his and President Trump’s approach.

Atlas, a source of nearly endless controversy, sent a tweet on Saturday calling into question the efficacy of facial coverings in preventing the coronavirus. “Masks work? No,” said his tweet. In recent months, Atlas has become Trump’s pandemic point man, angering other members of the White House coronavirus task force, including Drs. Deborah Birx and Anthony Fauci. 

One former staffer on the coronavirus task force called him a “disaster.”

The missive was widely condemned by public health officials and ultimately removed by Twitter. It has also earned disapproval from the CDC, whose director has complained about Atlas’s credibility. 

In a statement emailed to Yahoo News, the CDC disputed Atlas’s conclusions without naming him directly. “CDC guidance on masks has clearly stated that wearing a mask is intended to protect other people in case the mask wearer is infected. At no time has CDC guidance suggested that masks were intended to protect the wearers.

“Growing evidence increasingly shows that wearing masks in community settings reduces transmission among individuals in that community,” the statement continued. “There are laboratory studies, animal studies, community and epidemiological studies, as well as policy studies that show masking reduces transmission in communities by blocking exhaled respiratory droplets.”

White House coronavirus adviser Dr. Scott Atlas speaks at the White House, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, in Washington. (Alex Brandon/AP)
Trump coronavirus adviser Dr. Scott Atlas at the White House on Oct. 12. (Alex Brandon/AP)

The CDC further speculated that while mask wearing has led to “sufficient protection” within subjects’ social networks, those subjects likely contracted the coronavirus in a bar or restaurant, where people take off masks to eat and drink. 

Atlas’s Saturday tweet cited Los Angeles, Miami, Israel and Spain as places where, he said, masks did not work. He said there were “many harms” to wearing masks, though it is not clear what those were. 

That conclusion appeared to be based on an errant reading of a CDC study published in the Sept. 11 issue of its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a compendium of the latest research. The study in question reviewed data from 154 people who had tested positive for the coronavirus and had been treated at 11 medical centers around the country.

Atlas’s tweet was subsequently removed for violating Twitter’s rules on spreading misinformation. The social media site has taken a more aggressive stance in regard to conspiracy theories and fake news, including when such items are disseminated by the president himself.

Uncowed, Atlas followed up on Saturday with another tweet, in which he attempted to explain his original message. “That means the right policy is @realDonaldTrump guideline: use masks for their intended purpose

Dr. Augusto Sola, Masimo VP of Medical Affairs for Neonatology, Honored by the American Academy of Pediatrics with Pioneer Award

Dr. Sola Pioneered New Protocol Using Masimo SET® Pulse Oximetry That Dramatically Reduced Blindness and Eye Damage in Neonates

Masimo (NASDAQ: MASI) announced today that Augusto Sola, MD, Vice President of Medical Affairs for Neonatology at Masimo, has been awarded the 2020 Pioneer Award, Section of Neonatal Perinatal Medicine, by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The honor recognizes the groundbreaking achievements and contributions Dr. Sola has made, using his Masimo SET®-based protocol, to improve the health and well-being of newborn infants.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201019005215/en/

Dr. Augusto Sola (Photo: Business Wire)

Dr. Sola’s impressive career in neonatology has improved the lives of countless newborns in the U.S., Latin America, and across the world. Dr. Sola’s innovative research on oxygen administration and monitoring oxygen saturation in preterm infants has played a key role in reducing the rate of neonatal blindness (retinopathy of prematurity) and our understanding of the impact of various neonatal practices on the developing brain. Dr. Sola has published 130 original articles in peer-reviewed journals, 390 review articles, and 5 neonatology textbooks, as well as delivered more than 3,500 lectures to research and clinical groups around the world. Dr. Sola also founded the Ibero-American Society of Neonatology (SIBEN), dedicated to continuous quality improvement in neonatal care throughout the Americas.

Dr. Sola received his MD at Buenos Aires University School of Medicine and completed his Pediatric Residency and Chief Pediatric Residency at the University of Massachusetts, followed by a Neonatal Fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. In neonatal practice since 1974, Dr. Sola has been Professor of Pediatrics at Buenos Aires University Medical School, the University of California, San Francisco, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Emory University. In addition to his position at Masimo, Dr. Sola continues to work directly with critically ill newborns.

Dr. Sola’s seminal work was done in 1998 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The results, published in 2003 by Drs. Sola, Wright, and Chow, showed that using a new protocol with Masimo SET®, clinicians reduced ROP to nearly zero over five years.1 Dr. Sola and colleagues later showed at Emory that the protocol’s success depended on SET® technology, as the same protocol with a competing pulse oximeter did not reduce ROP.2 Dr. Sola’s work on the reduction of ROP through oxygen saturation targeting has now become the standard of care.3-5

Dr. Sergio Golombek, MD, MPH, Professor of Pediatrics at New York Medical College, Neonatologist, Ex-President of SIBEN, and AAP member, commented, “In 1952, a Chicago newspaper wrote: ‘The best friend a baby ever had,’ referring to pediatrician Isaac A. Abt, MD, FAAP (1867-1955), founder of the AAP and its first president in 1930. He was known as a leading clinician, academic, advocate, promoter, writer, and leader. I think this has been overcome by Dr. Sola, who is, in my opinion, the best friend of a baby and his or her parents

NEET 2020 Tamil Nadu Shepherd’s Son Who Cracked Medical Entrance Exam NEET Needs Help To Study Medicine

Tamil Nadu Shepherd's Son Who Cracked NEET Needs Help To Study Medicine

Tamil Nadu government school topper Jeevith Kumar has cleared medical entrance exam NEET with 664 marks.

Chennai:

A Tamil Nadu student, the son of a shepherd father and a tailor mother, has not only cracked the all-India medical college entrance exam NEET, but topped among candidates from state’s government schools. His family, however, has no means to pay for his college fee.

“My family can’t even afford the admission fee for a government medical college. I need help so I could pursue my further studies,” Jeevith Kumar, who cleared NEET on his second attempt, told NDTV.

Jeevith Kumar’s journey so far has not been without struggle.

Even though he secured 548 out of 600 in Class 12 last year, Jeevith could only score 193 marks in the medical entrance exam without private tuition. Seeing untapped potential in the teenager, teacher-turned-activist R Sabarimala posted a video appealing for help on the social media.

Things changed for him after help came from a Good Samaritan in the US who paid Rs 75,000 to get him enrolled in a private coaching centre for a year-long residential programme that costs Rs 1.15 lakh. His teachers also pitched in to help and this time he has scored 664 in NEET.

“Right from his first day in school, I had always prayed to God to give him good teachers. They have made all this possible. He did not follow English coaching earlier but teachers motivated him to just study. I have another son and a daughter,” said Jeevith’s mother, who adds to the family’s income by doing tailoring under the 100-day work programme.

Jeevith, however, never aspired to be a doctor but took it as a challenge when HE saw many aspirants die by suicide over the last few years on failing in the test.

Asked if he could have cracked the medical entrance exam without private coaching, Jeevith said, “No way. It was the coaching that made it possible for me. I want to help many poor students like me become doctors. After becoming a doctor I’ll reach out to poor patients.”

As Jeevith seeks help to secure his future, a key bill that could help many students like him awaits clearance by the Governor.

In September, the Tamil Nadu assembly had passed a bill to reserve 7.5 per cent seats in medical colleges for government school students. However, BJP-appointed Governor Banwarilal Purohit is yet to sign it or reject it. Any further delay in passing the bill could deny opportunity for around 300 NEET-qualified students from government schools.

The Tamil Nadu assembly passed the bill after it failed to get an exemption for state students from appearing in NEET. For nearly a decade the state had abolished the medical entrance exam and made admission on the basis of marks secured in class 12. Successive state governments have argued that the NEET favours the affluent, who can afford private coaching, and denies opportunity to the poor and those from rural backgrounds who score well in

Long lines as Missouri medical marijuana dispensaries open

ST. LOUIS — Missouri’s first licensed marijuana dispensaries opened this weekend in the St. Louis area with long lines.

The two dispensaries run by N’Bliss opened Saturday in Ellisville and Manchester. Another dispensary is expected to open Monday in the Kansas City area nearly two years after Missouri voters approved a constitutional amendment to allow the sale of medical marijuana.

To buy the drug, people need approval from a doctor and a state medical marijuana card. Prices are expected to be high initially because the supply is limited in the state at this stage. N’Bliss was charging $125 for an eighth of an ounce of marijuana when it opened Saturday.

Kim Haller said she stood in line Saturday because she has long been frustrated with the high cost of medications and injections she uses to treat her multiple sclerosis. Recently, Haller said she had been buying marijuana from a licensed caregiver.

“It helps with my spasticity, which means my muscles don’t move like I like them to, and sleep,” Haller, 54, of St. Peters, said of the marijuana treatment.

In the Kansas City area, Brenda Dougherty said she hopes to be one of Fresh Green’s first customers when it opens this week in Lee’s Summit. The 57-year-old from Warrensburg said she believes marijuana will help relieve her chronic pain condition.

“I don’t want to take any more pills,” she said. “I know this will help. To be quite honest, I have tried it and, yes, it does help.”

The Missouri Department of Health and Human Services expects most of the state’s 192 approved dispensaries to be open by the end of the year.

“Missouri patients have always been our North Star as we work to implement the state’s medical marijuana program,” Dr. Randall Williams, department director, said in a news release. “We greatly appreciate how hard everyone has worked so that patients can begin accessing a safe and well-regulated program.”

NEET results 2020: Mumbai’s top scorers aim to pursue medicine at 94-year-old civic-run Seth GS Medical College – education

NEET results 2020: A day after the National Testing Agency (NTA) announced results for the National Eligibility-cum-Entrance Test (NEET UG), celebrations continue in several Mumbai households. Several top performers scored 700 out of 720, making it possible to bag a seat in the institute of their choice.

Jayatra Shah (18), scored 180 on 180 in the physics section of the examination while his overall score was 700 out of 720. “I’ve spent the past few months focussing on my HSC board exam as well as NEET. I am very happy with my NEET score. This should help me bag a seat in GS Medical College (attached to KEM hospital, Parel), where my brother is currently pursuing his third year MBBS,” said Shah, whose father is an ophthalmologist and mother a gynaecologist.

Anuj Doshi (18) and his twin brother Agam spent the last few months studying together and have both scored well. “My motivation was a promise I made to my teachers that I will do well in the entrance exam and I’m glad I managed to keep my promise. After MBBS I wish to pursue higher education in either hospital administration and management or artificial intelligence (AI),” said Anuj, who scored 700 on 720 in NEET-UG while his brother Agam scored 645. Anuj also wants to pursue medicine at Seth GS Medical College.

The state topper this year was 18-year old Ashish Zantye from Malwan, Sindhudurg district. He scored 710 out of 720, bagging the all India rank of 19.

The Directorate of Medical Education and Research (DMER) will announce dates for admissions to state medical and dental colleges soon. Admissions will be conducted by the state common entrance test (CET) cell.

Source Article

When To Seek Medical Advice?

KEY POINTS

  • Pneumonia is a condition that could prove dangerous for older adults
  • Detecting the symptoms when they appear will be beneficial for the elderly
  • Some of the common symptoms are cough, fever, chest pain 

Pneumonia is a dangerous condition for older adults as it puts them at a higher risk of developing complications. Detecting the symptoms of pneumonia in older adults at the earliest will ensure that the patient is afforded treatment the soonest. 

The American Lung Association (ALA) stated that the immune system of older adults is not that strong anymore in fighting off the disease. This is why their risk of developing complications, or a serious illness related to pneumonia, also becomes higher.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed that in the United States, there are more than 250,000 individuals who need to seek care in a hospital because of pneumonia every year. There are about 50,000 people who died in the U.S. due to the disease.

The Symptoms

Medical News Today reported that the usual symptoms of pneumonia include a cough, which could either be dry or one that produces phlegm. Difficulty in breathing is also indicative of pneumonia. Fever could also be a sign, as well as chest pain. These symptoms, however, may not be the same for older adults as they could exhibit milder or fewer symptoms. 

In older adults, the typical symptoms would include poor coordination, which would often cause falls. Older adults may also show that there was a sudden change in their day-to-day functions. Other symptoms of pneumonia in older adults would include confusion, delirium, incontinence and reduced appetite. 

Pneumonia in Older Adults Symptoms of pneumonia in older adults Photo: truthseeker08/Pixabay

The most common form of pneumonia is bacterial pneumonia, which tends to be more serious. The ALA stated that the symptoms of this type of pneumonia can develop gradually or suddenly. Bacterial pneumonia symptoms would include sweating, fever that can reach high temperatures up to 105 degrees Fahrenheit, increased breathing, increased pulse rate, confusion, bluish nailbeds and lips. 

On the other hand, symptoms of viral pneumonia develop over several days. With this kind of pneumonia, the initial signs that one may see or experience include fever, headache, dry cough, muscle weakness and muscle pain. Thereafter, about one or two days, the symptoms would start worsening. At this point, the patient may experience increased coughing, muscle pain, shortness of breath, blue lips and high fever.

When To Seek Medical Advice?

For older adults, pneumonia can become serious. They must also seek immediate medical advice if they notice breathing difficulties, coughing up blood, or chest pain. Other symptoms that need immediate medical attention include fainting, high fever, confusion and severe cough with mucus.

Source Article

Allina to pull medical residents out of United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh



(Thinkstock)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
(Thinkstock)

For 50 years, the United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh Street has catered to the working poor and underinsured patients, including today many East African immigrants and neighborhood residents.

And the nonprofit health center has done so hand-in-hand with Allina Health, a 12-hospital, 90-clinic health network that has provided the majority of the clinic’s physicians, 21 medical residents, electronic records, lab services and even their phone line.

Now, Allina is in the process of pulling out all 21 medical residents and finding another location near United Hospital where the medical residents can complete their three-year rotations in family medicine.

By the end of the year, the faculty physicians are expected to follow them, leaving the clinic nearly devoid of primary care doctors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are expected to pick up the slack under the clinic’s new model of team-based care.

“The pandemic certainly has accelerated changes in the health care system,” said Sara Criger, president of United Hospital, who said medical residents and faculty had complained of patient scheduling and other issues at the clinic, hurting the reputation of Allina’s residency program.

Criger added: “There were problems that United Family Medicine needed to address. As the clinic made changes, we had to determine if they meet our requirements or not, and it became apparent that they did not.”

The deteriorating relationship between the community health clinic and Allina has led to finger-pointing on at least three sides.

CALLS FOR CEO TO RESIGN

Alarmed by a lengthy period of employee furloughs and other emergency management steps, a group of former United Family Medicine board members and West Seventh Street advocates have laid blame on the health clinic’s leadership and called for them to step down.

Those advocates include former United Family Medicine board chair Andrea Marboe, longtime West Seventh Street activist Marit Brock and former St. Paul City Council Member Dave Thune.

“We’ve totally lost confidence in the program and they should stop funding them,” said Thune, who is circulating a petition calling for major funders to sever ties and for United Family Medicine Chief Executive Officer Ann Nyakundi to resign.

“We want a neighborhood clinic with doctor-patient relationships, real family physicians that follow you to the hospital,” Thune said. “She walked in and six months later turned the clinic upside down. We just prefer she leave now.”

Nyakundi and Jonathan Watson, CEO of the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, said operations at the clinic have stabilized since the start of the pandemic.

“When I inherited the clinic, our 2020 budget at the start of the year was actually worse than it is now,” said Nayakundi, who stepped in as CEO last October after the previous CEO resigned. “We’ve done a really good job efficiently navigating the pandemic and staffing to demand. We temporarily had furloughs, but we’ve brought all of the staff back, and we’re actually in a period of growth.”

Critics, including former board

Allina to pull medical residents out of United Family Medicine clinics on St. Paul’s West Seventh



(Thinkstock)


© Provided by Twin Cities Pioneer Press
(Thinkstock)

For 50 years, the United Family Medicine clinic on St. Paul’s West Seventh Street has catered to the working poor and underinsured patients, including today many East African immigrants and residents.

And the nonprofit health center has done so hand-in-hand with Allina Health, a 12-hospital, 90-clinic health network that has provided the majority of the clinic’s physicians, 21 medical residents, electronic records, lab services and even their phone line.

Now, Allina is in the process of pulling out all 21 medical residents and finding another location near United Hospital where the students can complete their three-year rotations in family medicine.

By the end of the year, the faculty physicians are expected to follow them, leaving the clinic nearly devoid of primary care doctors. Physician assistants and nurse practitioners are expected to pick up the slack in the clinic’s new team-based care model.

“The pandemic certainly has accelerated changes in the healthcare system,” said Sara Criger, president of United Hospital, who said medical residents and faculty had complained of patient scheduling and other issues at the clinic, hurting the reputation of Allina’s residency program.

Criger added: “There were problems that United Family Medicine needed to address. As the clinic made changes, we had to determine if they meet our requirements or not, and it became apparent that they did not.”

The deteriorating relationship between the community health clinic and Allina has led to finger-pointing on at least three sides.

CALLS FOR CEO TO RESIGN

Alarmed by a lengthy period of employee furloughs and other emergency management steps, a group of former United Family Medicine board members and West Seventh Street advocates have laid blame on the health clinic’s leadership and called for them to step down.

Those advocates include former United Family Medicine board chair Andrea Marboe, longtime West Seventh Street activist Marit Brock, former St. Paul City Council Member Dave Thune and St. Paul Public Works Director Sean Kershaw, who was recently a nonprofit leader.

“We’ve totally lost confidence in the program and they should stop funding them,” said Thune, who is circulating a petition calling for major funders to sever ties and for United Family Medicine Chief Executive Officer Ann Nyakundi to resign.

“We want a neighborhood clinic with doctor-patient relationships, real family physicians that follow you to the hospital,” Thune said. “She walked in and six months later turned the clinic upside down. We just prefer she leave now.”

Nyakundi and Jonathan Watson, CEO of the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, said operations at the clinic have stabilized since the start of the pandemic.

“When I inherited the clinic, our 2020 budget at the start of the year was actually worse than it is now,” said Nayakundi, who stepped in as CEO last October after the previous CEO resigned. “We’ve done a really good job efficiently navigating the pandemic and staffing to demand. We temporarily had furloughs, but we’ve brought all of the staff back, and we’re actually