Tag: Maryland

 

Maryland University of Integrative Health Appoints New Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine Department Chair

Laurel, Md. – Maryland University of Integrative Health is pleased to announce that it has appointed Dr. Sharon Jennings-Rojas as the new chair of its acupuncture and Oriental medicine department. She brings a wealth of professional experiences to the role as a clinician, community health advocate, faculty member, and administrator.

Dr. Jennings-Rojas’ career includes a strong emphasis on community outreach and services. Since 2001, she has maintained a private practice providing care for individuals, families, and communities, and has served as a consultant, acupuncturist, and educator for the Howard County (MD) Detention Center and the Goucher College Student Health Center. She has also provided acupuncture detox services at Lincoln Hospital in New York, directed a maternal substance abuse acupuncture program as part of University of Maryland Medical Systems, consulted with the Federal Bureau of Prisons to incorporate acupuncture and meditation into recovery programs, and directed acupuncture and HIV administrative services for the CAMBA community support organization in the New York City area. Her work also includes providing access and advocacy for wounded warriors within various military installations.

“It’s paramount that we elevate the next generation of practitioners/healers. In this day and time, this new level of compassionate care is calling us all to take action by making integrative health, inclusive of acupuncture and other forms of world medicine, accessible to all people, including marginalized populations. We need more focus and care that provide an expanded understanding of the co-morbidities that plague underserved communities. Education and access are the keys. Once communities, and the people within them, know their natural healthcare options, and holistic ways of bolstering their health, they are more empowered to take their healthcare and wellness into their own hands. Education, self-advocacy, and access are key features of a healthcare system that can truly bring forth health and healing in all communities. MUIH is in a position to help redefine how we provide healthcare in this country. We’re prepared to take compassionate care to the next level, for all people and all communities.” said Dr. Jennings-Rojas.

She holds a Master of Acupuncture, and a Doctorate of Oriental Medicine from MUIH, as well as a B.A. in Eastern Philosophy from Vassar College. She has also completed graduate coursework in the philosophy of education from Teachers College of Columbia University. She also holds certification as a practitioner and trainer for the NADA protocol/ Ear acupuncture to address addictions, stress, and trauma. Dr. Jennings-Rojas has been a longstanding member of the MUIH community as a student, faculty, and staff member. She previously held several roles in MUIH’s acupuncture and Oriental medicine department including clinical faculty, director of community partnerships, and division chair of clinical practices.

“Dr. Jennings-Rojas has the experience and vision to expand acupuncture access across healthcare settings and within communities. Her academic, administrative, and clinical backgrounds make Dr. Jennings-Rojas the ideal leader for educating an acupuncture workforce prepared to address the complexity of modern healthcare needs,” said Dr. James Snow, Dean of Academic Affairs.

About Maryland University of Integrative

Maryland Coronavirus Cases Climb By Nearly 800 In One Day

MARYLAND — Nearly 800 confirmed cases of the coronavirus were added to the count in Maryland in the past day, state health officials reported Saturday. On Oct. 1, there were more than 125,000 cases; as of Saturday, Oct. 17, there were more than 135,000.

Gov. Larry Hogan announced Friday that fans would again be allowed at sporting events in the state, including NFL games.

Both M&T Bank Stadium and FedEx Field may host crowds of up to 10 percent capacity.

“With our key health metrics low and stable, we are taking steps to allow more spectators,” Hogan said in a statement Friday. He said the positivity rate was stable, “cases per 100K have declined, and zero counties are in the federal government’s ‘red zone.'”

The positivity rate is at 3.15 percent on a seven-day rolling average, according to the Maryland Department of Health.

In the past two weeks, hospitalizations have risen by about 100; there were 323 people hospitalized with the virus as of Saturday, Oct. 3, and officials said there were 422 Saturday, Oct. 17.

Here is the data about the coronavirus in Maryland from the state health department as of Saturday, Oct. 17:

Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.
Courtesy of Maryland Department of Health.

This article originally appeared on the Baltimore Patch

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Maryland adds 781 coronavirus cases, four deaths Friday

Maryland officials reported 781 new coronavirus cases on Friday and four new deaths associated with COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

With Friday’s additions, Maryland has confirmed 134,329 cases and 3,887 deaths in total since state officials began tracking the spread of the virus in March. Through Thursday’s data, Maryland had the 29th most cases per capita and the 16th most deaths per capita in the U.S., according to the Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus resource center.

According to the university, it had conducted the 32nd-most tests per capita in the country. Maryland officials reported a total testing volume of just over 3 million on Friday, up by over 27,000 from Thursday. Officials also reported that nearly 11,000 additional people had tested negative on Friday.

The state’s seven-day positivity rate increased slightly from the previous day, sitting at 3.09% heading into the weekend.

Johns Hopkins, meanwhile, reported the state’s seven-day positivity rate to be 5.53%. Rather than calculate this rate by looking at the percentage of tests conducted that return a positive result — as state officials do — the university uses the percentage of people who test positive for the virus in a weeklong span, meaning individuals who are tested multiple times, regardless of results are only counted once in its measure.

This difference is significant because the World Health Organization says governments should wait until their positivity rates measure below 5% for 14 straight days before beginning to ease back virus-related restrictions.

According to state officials, Maryland has been under this threshold since July — the last day the state reported a daily positivity rate higher than 5% was July 28 — but Johns Hopkins hasn’t reported a rate lower than that bench mark for weeks.

After the number of people hospitalized from the virus’s effects dropped slightly on Thursday, this number increased again on Friday. Maryland reported four new COVID-19 patients on Friday, bringing the total to 416. According to state officials, 111 patients are currently being treated in intensive care units, up by two from Thursday.

As of Friday, 7,869 total people had been released from isolation after testing positive for COVID-19.

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