Tag: lockdown

 

Mom-Of-Four Dies At 31 After Cancer Treatment Canceled During Coronavirus Lockdown

Coronavirus pandemic has resulted in diagnoses and treatments being put on hold or delayed, resulting in the deterioration or even death of several patients. One such patient was a woman battling brain cancer who died after her chemotherapy was paused during the coronavirus lockdown in the United Kingdom.

The woman, identified as 31-year-old Emma Jenkinson, was suffering from grade 4 brain cancer, a condition she had previously beaten in her early 20s.

Her treatment was put on hold after the pandemic hit the country in March this year. Her condition deteriorated and she died earlier this month, leaving her four children and husband behind.

“She has grade four brain cancer and unfortunately her chemotherapy was paused in March due to covid19, before this, the cancer was reacting well to treatment,” her husband Andrew wrote on a GoFundMe page set up to raise funds for the woman’s family.

“At the beginning of May, Emma started feeling really unwell. She started losing her balance, falling over. At its worst she was falling 15-20 times a day. She actually fell over in the garden quite heavily and banged her head on a post so I had to rush her to A&E. It was later in the month she had a scan and found that the cancer had increased and was placed on chemotherapy straight away,” he added.

Her condition deteriorated in September.

“Unfortunately in September she started getting pressure in her head and feeling unwell again and after another scan she was told that the chemotherapy has stopped working,” he wrote.

They were then informed by the doctor that her surgery cannot be conducted as it will cause lot damage and affect her quality of life.

She died the following month. 

Calling her a “fantastic mother,” Andrew wrote, “All Emma wants like any mother is for her children to be healthy & happy in the future. All she wants is for the children to have happy memories of her and us all together.”

cancer chemo In this photo, patient receives chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer at the Antoine-Lacassagne Cancer Center in Nice on July 26, 2012. Photo: Reuters/Eric Gaillard

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Ireland In Second Lockdown As Germany Faces Record Virus Surge

Businesses closed across Ireland on Thursday for a second national coronavirus lockdown, as record infection surges in Germany and Italy helped to spread gloom across the continent.

Most European governments have been reluctant to reimpose national stay-at-home orders, after previous restrictions led to deep recessions and widespread bitterness.

Ireland's five million people have been ordered to stay at home for six weeks, with non-essential businesses told to shut up shop, among other rules Ireland’s five million people have been ordered to stay at home for six weeks, with non-essential businesses told to shut up shop, among other rules Photo: AFP / Paul Faith

But Ireland’s five million people have been ordered to stay at home for six weeks, with non-essential businesses told to shut up shop, among other rules.

“It’s devastating to see us locked down again… during our busiest line-up for the Christmas period,” Dublin antique jeweller John Farrington told AFP this week.

German diners have been finding novel ways to socialise in a time of severe restrictions German diners have been finding novel ways to socialise in a time of severe restrictions Photo: AFP / STEFANIE LOOS

Germany and Italy are both facing record surges, registering their highest one-day tallies since the pandemic began.

While German health experts said it was still possible to combat the outbreak by observing recently-toughened rules on distancing and gatherings, Italy ordered curfews in regions that cover the capital Rome and business hub Milan.

As Europe suffers, China — where the virus first emerged at the end of last year — continues to make strides back to normality, announcing it would allow 10,000 fans to watch the final of its Super League football competition.

Essential workers, members of the clergy, parents and activists participate in a 'die-in' and memorial service to honor those who have died of Covid-19 in Los Angeles Essential workers, members of the clergy, parents and activists participate in a ‘die-in’ and memorial service to honor those who have died of Covid-19 in Los Angeles Photo: AFP / Frederic J. BROWN

“It’d be that kind of ceiling because it’s a big game for sure,” Chinese Football Association secretary-general Liu Yi told AFP.

The virus has killed more than 1.1 million people and prompted a catastrophic economic downturn — the International Monetary Fund predicting a 4.4 percent drop in global output for 2020.

Graphic highlighting the countries with the largest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in the past week. Graphic highlighting the countries with the largest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in the past week. Photo: AFP / John SAEKI

In the City of Love, masks and curfews have put a damper on romance, as dating and flirting gives way to a fear of contamination. In the City of Love, masks and curfews have put a damper on romance, as dating and flirting gives way to a fear of contamination. Photo: AFPTV / Guillaume BONNET

Germany, along with most European countries, has already banned large gatherings and made face masks compulsory in certain areas.

“The overall situation has become very serious,” said Lothar Wieler, head of the Robert Koch Institute disease control centre, adding that it was still possible to bring the virus under control through “systematic compliance with restrictive measures”.

In a symbol of Germany’s woes, Health Minister Jens Spahn — widely praised for his calm stewardship during the pandemic — tested positive and went into home isolation.

In Israel, people were enjoying their freedom after the government raised the second lockdown In Israel, people were enjoying their freedom after the government raised the second lockdown Photo: AFP / MENAHEM KAHANA

In Belgium, which has one of the worst records of virus infections per person, Foreign Minister Sophie Wilmes is being

Ireland to reimpose national lockdown amid surge in COVID-19 cases

Ireland’s government is set to impose a six-week lockdown on the entire country as COVID-19 cases continue to rise, according to The New York Times.

The country will become the first in Europe to reimpose a nationwide lockdown when it shuts down nonessential businesses on Wednesday night, according to the Times.

“While we have slowed the spread of the virus, this has not been enough and further action is required,” Micheal Martin, the taoiseach, or leader of the government, said in a national address on Monday night, the Times reported.

Irish residents will be urged to remain at home and restaurants will be relegated to takeout or delivery only, according to the Times.

The country will impose fines on people who travel more than 5 km from their homes during the lockdown, The Guardian reported.

While schools and child care providers will remain open under the new action, gatherings and visits to private homes will be prohibited, the Times reported.

“If we pull together over the last six weeks, we will have the opportunity to celebrate Christmas in a meaningful way,” Martin told the nation, according to the Times.

Ireland reported 1,031 new COVID-19 cases on Monday, according to The Guardian. The total number of cases there is 50,993, according to John Hopkins University’s count. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: ‘The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it’ Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE has made public comments in the past about avoiding a future lockdown in the U.S. Though coronavirus cases have risen across the country, Trump said he would not be in favor of a lockdown.

“[Joe] Biden would terminate our recovery, delay the vaccine, prolong the pandemic and annihilate Florida’s economy with a draconian, unscientific lockdown,” Trump said at a Florida rally in October, seeking to frame the narrative around his Democratic opponent in the presidential election. 

Biden has not pledged to reimpose lockdowns if he becomes president, saying only that he’ll “listen to the scientists.”

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Two Week ‘Firebreak’ Lockdown for Wales



These are the UK coronavirus stories you need to know about today.

Lockdown Wales

A two-week national ‘firebreak’ aimed at controlling the spread of COVID-19 will be imposed in Wales.

Everybody in Wales will be required to stay at home from 6pm on Friday 23 October until Monday 9 November, the Welsh Government announced.

People deemed critical workers, and those who were unable to work from home would be exempted.

As widely anticipated, non-essential shops, pubs, restaurants, leisure businesses, community centres, libraries, and recycling centres will close.

Gatherings for Halloween and Bonfire Night will not be allowed, but there will be some exemptions for limited Remembrance commemorations.

Mark Drakeford, First Minister of Wales, described the lockdown as “a time-limited firebreak” and a “short, sharp shock to turn back the clock, slow down the virus, and give us more time”.

Mr Drakeford, who met with Government colleagues this morning, said that critical care units in Wales were already full.

He warned that the number of people being taken to hospital with coronavirus symptoms was growing every day and that, without tough action, there was “a very real risk that our NHS would be overwhelmed”.

He told a news conference: “Unless we act, the NHS will not be able to look after the increasing number of people who are falling seriously ill.”

The start of the Welsh firebreak lockdown has been timed to coincide with the beginning of the half-term break for schoolchildren. However, some children will be allowed to return to class after the holiday period ends.

The restrictions mean that:

  • Childcare facilities will remain open

  • Primary schools will reopen after half-term

  • Secondary schools will reopen, but only for children in years 7 and 8, and those taking exams

  • Children in other school years will continue their learning from home

University students would be required to stay at home in their accommodation and continue their education through a blend of online and in-person learning.

Mr Drakeford said that during the two-week lockdown, people would be banned from gathering with people not in their household, either indoors or outdoors.

However, exceptions would made for adults living alone, and single parents, who would continue to be able to join with one other household for support.

Places of worship would be closed, other than for funerals and weddings.

The Welsh Government said that it would announce a package of financial measures to help individuals and businesses affected by the lockdown. It would include an economic resilience fund of nearly £300 million.

Convalescent Plasma

NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) appealed for more people who have had COVID-19 to donate their blood plasma at 14 new donation centres in England for use in treatment trials for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

The NHS trials of convalescent plasma are the largest randomised controlled trials for this “promising” treatment for COVID-19.

NHSBT already collects plasma in its 23 permanent blood donor centres and in five pop-up plasma centres.

It said donations were urgently needed to ensure that if the trial

Fauci: COVID-19 outbreaks would have to ‘get really, really bad’ before advocating for national lockdown

New COVID-19 cases are accelerating across the U.S., rising swiftly above previous record case counts set during the tumultuous spring and summer months. 

There has been a documented 30 percent increase in testing positivity rates over the past two weeks and more than 8 million COVID-19 cases reported in the country. But, even as the U.S. enters a potentially troubling winter season, Anthony Fauci, the country’s leading infectious diseases expert, says that a nationwide lockdown may not be the best solution at this time. 

Speaking to “60 Minutes,” Fauci says outbreaks would have to “get really, really bad” before he would advocate for a national lockdown. 


ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE COULD GET WORSE DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

PROPOSAL TO LET CORONAVIRUS SPREAD NATURALLY THROUGH US POPULATION INTERESTS WHITE HOUSE, ALARMS MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENT

EUROPE REENTERS LOCKDOWNS AS COVID-19 CASES SURGE

THE FIRST DEATH FROM A CORONAVIRUS REINFECTION HAS BEEN REPORTED


First of all, the country is fatigued with restrictions. So we wanna use public health measures not to get in the way of opening the economy, but to being a safe gateway to opening the economy,” Fauci said. “So instead of having an opposition, open up the economy, get jobs back, or shut down. No. Put ‘shut down’ away and say, ‘We’re gonna use public health measures to help us safely get to where we want to go.’” 

Instead, Fauci says, the emphasis remains on practicing now-familiar public health measures like wearing masks, physically distancing and washing hands frequently — key steps in controlling virus transmission. 

He elaborated that these practices are not intended to halt the reopening of public spaces, but to facilitate a gradual reopening while still mitigating transmission levels or how quickly the virus spreads.

Responding to President Trump’s criticism that he suddenly reversed course on his stance regarding the public wearing facial coverings, Fauci explained that his initial decision to discourage public mask-wearing came during the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE). 

When masks, especially homemade ones, became widely available and were shown to prevent virus transmission, Fauci advocated for their universal use.

“It became clear that cloth coverings…not necessarily a surgical mask or an N95, cloth coverings, work,” Fauci said. “Now there’s no longer a shortage of masks. Number two, meta-analysis studies show that, contrary to what we thought, masks really do work in preventing infection.”

Still, he admits he was wrong in his initial decision to discourage widespread mask-wearing.

“When you find out you’re wrong, it’s a manifestation of your honesty to say, ‘Hey, I was wrong. I did subsequent experiments and now it’s this way,’” he said. 

Many are looking toward an upcoming COVID-19 vaccine as a final piece to the puzzle of ending the COVID-19 pandemic. A treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is on the distant horizon, with multiple pharmaceutical companies in late stage clinical trials with their vaccine candidates.

Public confidence in a forthcoming vaccine, however, is relatively low, with only just more than half of the population

Wales to Enter Two Week ‘Fire Break’ Lockdown to Curb Coronavirus Spread | Health News

Wales will enter a “fire break” lockdown for two weeks, requiring everyone to stay home in order to curb the spread of the coronavirus.

First Minister Mark Drakeford announced on Monday that beginning at 6 p.m. Friday, all non essential businesses, such as retail stores, restaurants and bars, will shut down until Nov. 9.

People will only be allowed to leave their homes for essential reasons, such as to obtain necessary supplies and health services, exercise alone, access childcare and education, attend court and visit banks. The only exception will be made for essential workers and people with jobs that make it impossible to work from home.

Between Oct. 10 and 16, Public Health Wales confirmed 3,870 new cases of the coronavirus. More than 800 people are hospitalized with COVID-19, a number that is 20% higher than just a week ago.

Officials report more than 35,620 cases of the virus in Wales and more than 1,700 people have died.

The rate of infection is currently 1.4, and the seven-day rolling incidence rate for Wales stands at more than 120 cases per 100,000 population, according to the government.

“The aim of a fire break is to reset the clock,” Drakeford said.

Non essential travel within Wales and into and out of Wales will not be allowed during the two-week fire break. Additionally, people are not permitted to visit other households or meet with people they do not live with. Secondary schools, which will be on a break period, will remain closed for an additional week, though primary schools and child care centers will remain open.

Libraries, gyms and places of worship will also be closed.

Cartoons on the Coronavirus

Face coverings continue to be mandatory in indoor public spaces that remain open and on public transportation and in taxis.

If people violate the new rules, they could face a fine up to $78 on the first offense and up to $156 on the second.

“A fire break period is our best chance of regaining control of the virus and avoiding a much longer and much more damaging national lockdown,” Drakeford said. “This is the moment to come together, to play our part in a common endeavour.”

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UK Needs Three-Week Lockdown for COVID Reset: Government Adviser | World News

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain needs to impose a three-week period of national lockdown restrictions immediately to stop cases of COVID-19 spiralling, government scientific adviser Jeremy Farrar said, adding that current regional measures would not be effective.

“The current tiered restrictions will not bring the transmission rates down sufficiently or prevent the continued spread of the virus,” he said.

“A three-week period of nationally increased restrictions, with the right levels of financial support, will allow us to reset before winter, stop transmission spiralling, protect and prepare health services, give time to get the test-trace-isolate systems fully functional, and save lives,” he said.

Farrar, who is director of the Wellcome Trust and a member of the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, said the response needed to be immediate because putting it off would only worsen and lengthen the crisis.

He told Sky News that the best time to have locked down was two to three weeks ago, but it wasn’t too late now.

Senior minister Michael Gove, however, said a two- or three- week national lockdown – named a “circuit breaker” by some – was not being considered.

“The spread and the nature of the disease does not merit that approach at the moment,” he told Sky News on Sunday.

Gove did concede that there were problems with the level of compliance with the rules already in place for those who tested positive for COVID-19.

He said the level of government support available for those who were required to self-isolate was kept under constant review.

(Reporting by Paul Sandle; Editing by Kirsten Donovan)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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UK needs three-week lockdown for COVID reset: adviser

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain needs to impose a three-week period of national lockdown restrictions immediately to stop cases of COVID-19 spiralling, government scientific adviser Jeremy Farrar said, adding that current regional measures would not be effective.

“The current tiered restrictions will not bring the transmission rates down sufficiently or prevent the continued spread of the virus,” he said.

“A three-week period of nationally increased restrictions, with the right levels of financial support, will allow us to reset before winter, stop transmission spiralling, protect and prepare health services, give time to get the test-trace-isolate systems fully functional, and save lives,” he said.

Farrar, who is director of the Wellcome Trust and a member of the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, said the response needed to be immediate because putting it off would only worsen and lengthen the crisis.

He told Sky News that the best time to have locked down was two to three weeks ago, but it wasn’t too late now.

Senior minister Michael Gove, however, said a two- or three- week national lockdown – named a “circuit breaker” by some – was not being considered.

“The spread and the nature of the disease does not merit that approach at the moment,” he told Sky News on Sunday.

Gove did concede that there were problems with the level of compliance with the rules already in place for those who tested positive for COVID-19.

He said the level of government support available for those who were required to self-isolate was kept under constant review.

(Reporting by Paul Sandle; Editing by Kirsten Donovan)

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