Tag: ice

 

New England ice rinks shut down after coronavirus case clusters emerge linked to hockey

Health officials are concerned that indoor ice hockey could result in the spread of coronavirus this winter in several New England states, according to The Washington Post.

Massachusetts ordered all indoor ice rinks and skating facilities to close on Thursday, citing the 108 probable or confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been found to be linked to hockey games and their practices, according to a press release.

“This pause will allow for the development of stronger COVID-19 protocols to further protect players, families, coaches, arena staff and other participants, as well as communities surrounding hockey rinks,” the release stated.

New Hampshire made a similar move earlier in October. Health officials identified nearly 158 cases connected to hockey over a two-month period within the state, according to a press briefing held by Gov. Chris Sununu (R).

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also released a study in October that revealed that 14 out of 22 Florida hockey players suffered COVID-19 symptoms following a game at an indoor arena in June. 

“The indoor space and close contact between players during a hockey game increase infection risk for players and creates potential for a superspreader event, especially with ongoing community COVID-19 transmission,” according to the study.

Youth hockey games in Maine were canceled after one referee contracted the virus and potentially exposed nearly 400 people over the course of one weekend, according to the Portland Press Herald.

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott (R) issued a ban this month to keep rinks from taking new reservations for two weeks and will potentially add more restrictions, according to a news release.

Other states across the U.S. are preparing to brace for the winter amid spikes in coronavirus cases. The country has seen a total of 71,671 new cases and 865 deaths since Thursday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

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Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn't Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images / Doucefleur
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn't Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images/iStockphoto
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit

Every morning before I sit down to work, I fill up a large mason jar with ice water. And after I finish the liquid (and give myself a pat on the back), I go to town chomping on the ice. I realize that the sound of ice on teeth might make some cringe, but it’s never bothered me – I’ve always figured that I’m just consuming more water.

Much to my surprise, though, my dentist probably wouldn’t be too thrilled about my ice chewing habit.

“When I’m asked to name a food that has a high potential to cause trouble, I call out chewing ice as an issue,” Dr. Matt Messina, DDS, an ADA spokesperson, says. “Ice is a crystal and tooth enamel is a crystal. When you push two crystals against each other, one will break.”

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The somewhat good news is that Dr. Messina says that most of the time, the thing that breaks is the ice – however, sometimes it can be a tooth or a filling. “And that’s a self-inflicted injury,” Dr. Messina adds.

Along with unpopped popcorn kernels, Dr. Messina says ice is the most common culprit for broken teeth. “However, most of the time, a broken tooth or filling was in the process of failing and whatever you were eating was just the last straw.” Basically, you’re taking a risk.

Not going to lie – for me, that pile of ice on the bottom of my mason jar isn’t so appetizing anymore. Looks like I’ll be letting it melt, or leaving it out entirely, from now on.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

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Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images / Doucefleur
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images/iStockphoto
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit

Every morning before I sit down to work, I fill up a large mason jar with ice water. And after I finish the liquid (and give myself a pat on the back), I go to town chomping on the ice. I realize that the sound of ice on teeth might make some cringe, but it’s never bothered me – I’ve always figured that I’m just consuming more water.

Much to my surprise, though, my dentist probably wouldn’t be too thrilled about my ice chewing habit.

“When I’m asked to name a food that has a high potential to cause trouble, I call out chewing ice as an issue,” Dr. Matt Messina, DDS, an ADA spokesperson, says. “Ice is a crystal and tooth enamel is a crystal. When you push two crystals against each other, one will break.”

The somewhat good news is that Dr. Messina says that most of the time, the thing that breaks is the ice – however, sometimes it can be a tooth or a filling. “And that’s a self-inflicted injury,” Dr. Messina adds.

Along with unpopped popcorn kernels, Dr. Messina says ice is the most common culprit for broken teeth. “However, most of the time, a broken tooth or filling was in the process of failing and whatever you were eating was just the last straw.” Basically, you’re taking a risk.

Not going to lie – for me, that pile of ice on the bottom of my mason jar isn’t so appetizing anymore. Looks like I’ll be letting it melt, or leaving it out entirely, from now on.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

Continue Reading

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Intense, indoor sports raise coronavirus risk, CDC warns, citing 14 infected at ice hockey game

Evidence is beginning to show that intense, indoor sports can contribute to COVID-19 transmission, per a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which cited an ice hockey game resulting in 14 infected individuals.

The index patient, or believed source of infection, had a fever, cough, sore throat and headache a day after playing in the June 16 game in Tampa Bay, Fla., per the study. Two days later, a nasal swab confirmed the infection, and shortly thereafter 13 other players and a staff member at the ice rink came down with symptoms as well.

Of the 15 total cases, 11 infections were confirmed via PCR testing and two had positive antigen tests, while two were not tested.

“The ice rink provides a venue that is likely well suited to COVID-19 transmission as an indoor environment where deep breathing occurs, and persons are in close proximity to one another,” per the study.

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More infections cropped up on the index patient’s team, which the CDC said may have been from more exposure in their separate locker room and sitting closely together on the bench.

Longer exposure with the infected player in the locker room, and sitting closely together on the bench, may explain the greater number of cases on that team, the CDC theorized. (iStock)

Longer exposure with the infected player in the locker room, and sitting closely together on the bench, may explain the greater number of cases on that team, the CDC theorized. (iStock)

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The players flouted cloth face masks in the locker room and during the game but wore hockey-related protective face gear like plastic half-shields and metal cages, while still others wore no protective face gear, the health agency wrote.

The two on-ice referees managed to escape symptoms.

The CDC also took the plexiglass surrounding the rink into consideration, which created a “physically segregated playing area.” A sole spectator also managed to escape symptoms, but was not tested.

“The high proportion of infections that occurred in this outbreak provides evidence for SARS-CoV-2 transmission during an indoor sporting activity where intense physical activity is occurring,” the agency wrote. Staff at the Florida Department of Health followed up with isolation and quarantine guidance to those involved, among other steps taken.

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