Tag: homeless

 

There are enough homeless students in California to fill Dodger Stadium 5 times, study says

There were 269,269 K-12 students experiencing homelessness in California at the end of the 2018-2019 school year, according to a new study from UCLA. That’s enough students to fill the entire Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles about five times.

The report, released Wednesday by UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools, found the number of homeless students has risen by 50% in the last 10 years. With the number of homeless students surpassing 269,000, researchers hope the report will highlight the inadequacy of current programs for homeless youth and emphasize additional funding for programs and new policies on both the federal and state level. 

“Dodger Stadium is empty these days but can hold some 56,000 people for a big game. California could fill the stadium with students experiencing homelessness almost five times and still probably need to use the parking lot for overflow,” the study’s lead author, Joseph Bishop, said in a statement.”But our students are not in Dodger Stadium. We are talking about young people who may be sleeping on the streets, in cars, or in shelters. This is a crisis that deserves immediate action.”

The report also shines a light on cracks within federal laws such as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, which provides funding for homeless shelters. Researchers found that only 106 of 1,037 school districts in California received funding from the law and two out of three homeless students do not attend schools that receive funds. 

The authors of the report said the coronavirus pandemic is likely to bring more hardships for students and families experiencing homelessness. The UCLA report found that students experiencing homelessness were disproportionately Black and Latinx, making up 9% and 70% percent of students respectively.

“Homelessness impacts Latinx and Black students most with real and negative consequences,” said Lorena Camargo Gonzalez, a UCLA researcher and co-author of the report. “The prevalence of Latinx and Black youth experiencing homelessness requires more racially and culturally responsive strategies in education practice and policy.”

With this data, researchers hope to bridge the gap between available federal and state programs and students who have yet to receive aid. As homeless and housing instability has been proven to contribute to low attendance, poor grades, absentee rates, and graduation percentages, researchers hope the report can encourage schools to prioritize their at-risk students while still providing them with the learning experience they need to thrive.

“Even in these tense and difficult times, the large and growing number of students experiencing homelessness in our state is a crisis that should shock all of us,” said Tyrone Howard, faculty director of the school.  “We hope this report will create greater awareness of student homelessness, the racial disparities that exist with students experiencing homelessness, and provide policymakers with meaningful insight and information. Aggressive, immediate and effective action is needed by leaders at every level of government and in our community to dismantle this unacceptable crisis.”

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Homeless California students could fill Dodger Stadium 5 times, study says

There were 269,269 K-12 students experiencing homelessness in California at the end of the 2018-2019 school year, according to a new study from UCLA. That’s enough students to fill the entire Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles about five times.



a group of people riding skis on a snowy surface: California homelessness


© FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty
California homelessness

The report, released Wednesday by UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools, found the number of homeless students has risen by 50% in the last 10 years. With the number of homeless students surpassing 269,000, researchers hope the report will highlight the inadequacy of current programs for homeless youth and emphasize additional funding for programs and new policies on both the federal and state level. 

“Dodger Stadium is empty these days but can hold some 56,000 people for a big game. California could fill the stadium with students experiencing homelessness almost five times and still probably need to use the parking lot for overflow,” the study’s lead author, Joseph Bishop, said in a statement.”But our students are not in Dodger Stadium. We are talking about young people who may be sleeping on the streets, in cars, or in shelters. This is a crisis that deserves immediate action.”

The report also shines a light on cracks within federal laws such as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, which provides funding for homeless shelters. Researchers found that only 106 of 1,037 school districts in California received funding from the law and two out of three homeless students do not attend schools that receive funds. 

The authors of the report said the coronavirus pandemic is likely to bring more hardships for students and families experiencing homelessness. The UCLA report found that students experiencing homelessness were disproportionately Black and Latinx, making up 9% and 70% percent of students respectively.

“Homelessness impacts Latinx and Black students most with real and negative consequences,” said Lorena Camargo Gonzalez, a UCLA researcher and co-author of the report. “The prevalence of Latinx and Black youth experiencing homelessness requires more racially and culturally responsive strategies in education practice and policy.”

With this data, researchers hope to bridge the gap between available federal and state programs and students who have yet to receive aid. As homeless and housing instability has been proven to contribute to low attendance, poor grades, absentee rates, and graduation percentages, researchers hope the report can encourage schools to prioritize their at-risk students while still providing them with the learning experience they need to thrive.

“Even in these tense and difficult times, the large and growing number of students experiencing homelessness in our state is a crisis that should shock all of us,” said Tyrone Howard, faculty director of the school.  “We hope this report will create greater awareness of student homelessness, the racial disparities that exist with students experiencing homelessness, and provide policymakers with meaningful insight and information. Aggressive, immediate and effective action is needed by leaders at every level of government and in our community to dismantle this unacceptable crisis.”

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Homeless More Likely to Die After Heart Attack | Health News

By Steven Reinberg, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Homeless people are three times more likely to die after a heart attack than other patients, a new study finds.

“Our study shows a dramatically higher rate of mortality after heart attacks in people experiencing homelessness compared to non-homeless patients,” said researcher Dr. Samantha Liauw of the University of Toronto. “More research is needed to discover the reasons for this disparity in outcomes so that the chances of survival can be improved in this vulnerable population.”

Liauw and her colleagues compared more than 2,800 heart attack patients admitted to a Toronto hospital between 2008 and 2017. Of those, 75 were homeless.

Among homeless patients, 19% died in the hospital, compared with 6% of others. Homeless patients were younger than others and more likely to be men.

Eighty-four percent of homeless patients smoked compared to half of patients who were not homeless. Rates of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes were similar between the groups.

Also, more homeless patients suffered from mental conditions. They were more likely than others to abuse alcohol and drugs and were more likely to suffer a serious complication of heart attack called cardiogenic shock that occurs when the heart cannot supply enough blood and oxygen to the brain and other vital organs. They were more likely than other patients to go into cardiac arrest.

Both groups received medications, testing and stents, but the rate of stenting was lower in the homeless (80% versus 90% in non-homeless patients).

The findings were scheduled to be presented Wednesday at a virtual meeting of the 2020 Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.

“The elevated risk at a younger age could be related to chronic stress from being homeless, higher rates of smoking, poverty, and unreliable access to healthy food. Lack of trust in the medical system, poor access to health care for chronic conditions and slower receipt of emergency therapies may also have contributed,” Liauw said in a news release from the European Society of Cardiology, which will participate in the meeting.

Although both patient groups received timely treatment, she suspects the symptom start time listed for homeless people may be inaccurate, resulting in a longer gap before therapy began.

“This illustrates that we need new methods to study this disadvantaged part of society,” Liauw said.

Findings presented at meetings are considered preliminary until they’re published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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Fitness classes for homeless people opens to public after charity founder bounces back from covid-19

Street Fit Scotland founder Michelle Reilly putting classes through their paces at the Meadows
Street Fit Scotland founder Michelle Reilly putting classes through their paces at the Meadows

Michelle Reilly, who set up Street Fit Scotland while working in a hostel in 2014, was floored by covid-19 then pleurisy for a month just after lockdown in March. The 37-year-old feared her health and fitness programme would go to the wall.But instead the charity, which runs free outdoor boot camps for rough sleepers and those living in bed-and-breakfast accommodation, is ramping up its programme and launching a new running group – open to anyone in the Capital.Ms Reilly, who shared the stage with Dame Kelly Homes MBE at a wellbeing festival this year as the athlete talked about her battles with depression, has now been awarded £40,000 by NHS and ECC for two years.Over forty people are put through their paces every week at outdoor boot camps and online sessions led by Michelle and a range of coaches. The cash will mean SFS can support more people, including those recovering from addictions.Ms Reilly, who experienced homelessness as a teenager, was terrified when she struggled to get out of bed after getting the virus and a severe chest infection. But when she found out that two people in her group had attempted suicide during lockdown, she pushed herself to get back on her feet.She said: “I was so scared about what could happen to everyone if I wasn’t there. Lockdown was hard for the group. I had my phone on 24/7 on high suicide alert. If you’re stuck in a B&B it’s not always a positive place, we help get them out. We can’t just leave people to rot. Some people in hostels or temp accommodation are terrified, it can be chaotic.””People in the group have problems but Street Fit gives them access to something fun that they can do at their own pace and they don’t feel judged. They can come in feeling rubbish and leave buzzing,”The 37-year-old lost her younger brother and cousin to suicide and addiction. She said it hit her after lockdown that physical activity and the peer-led, group support was going to be even more vital in covid-19 times, especially for those already struggling with their mental health.”Two of the group tried to take their life during lockdown. It’s heart-breaking. My cousin was always in crisis and never had consistent support. That was one of the catalysts for me, to recognise there is not enough support for mental health.””Some of the group really struggled and some still are. They will feel like that again. I think we are going to see a big wave of mental health problems. What we are doing with outdoor boot camps, the online sessions and the new walking groups gives them a coping strategy. I can see it helping to build their resilience. Behaviour does change over time, given a chance. They are helping each other through hard times.”Members now get access to phone counselling and the charity has delivered tablets for everyone to make sure

Hope Center Houston in Spring partially reopens their doors for homeless clients

While Hope Center Houston has not been able to meet face-to-face with clients since COVID-19 precautions became the norm in March, the building is partially reopening to let clients take showers and do laundry.

Hope Center Houston, located in the Spring area, offers resources for people who are homeless. The faith-based nonprofit reopened their doors to one client at a time on Oct. 5, allowing non-staff into the building for the first time in months.

Bob Butler, executive director of Hope Center Houston, said the center never stopped serving clients, still providing meals and other products for visitors. The center has installed physical plexiglass barriers and now requires everyone to wear a mask.

“Ever since the COVID thing we’ve been providing hot meals, hygiene kits and clothing out of the front door,” Butler said. “We’ve served close to 4,000 meals now for the last six months and hundreds of hygiene kits and clothing.”


The staff is now smaller, with some people coming in more often, Butler said.

“Frankly, all of our volunteers are not comfortable yet coming back so we’re dealing with a smaller crew that’s coming in more frequently … to make sure that our needs are covered and we respect the rights of those who are a little bit more reserved and don’t want to be in the public yet,” Butler said.

Butler said case workers have been working nonstop on housing assessments, psych referrals and addiction help virtually and over the phone, if possible, as well as in-person. The chance for clients to take showers, do laundry and take clothing is a strong part of the partial reopening, Butler said.

“Everything else is continued with our case workers and our chaplain and people are making appointments and coming in one at a time,” Butler said. They come in, get the service and leave rather than hang out and spend the day with us. Unfortunately, a lot of what we do is really relational and we miss that.”

Usually when clients would come into Hope Center Houston, they would spend time with the staff or at one of the many activities going on such as prayer groups, meditation, life skill classes and help with job interviews as well as meals. Hope Center Houston has seen less clients in-person since the pandemic began. Clients used to be able to browse the internet or use the onsite library, none of which are currently available.

“I think to come for a hot meal or some hygiene without the relationship part doesn’t have the same value to them as being able to come and spend some good time with some good people,” Butler said. “Our numbers have decreased because I think they see the values of the service as decreased … These things are all going on simultaneously and they choose what it is