Tag: higher

 

Coronavirus deaths 5 times higher than flu in hospitalized patients, CDC says

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Study authors analyzed health records for nearly 4,000 COVID-19 patients and over 5,400 flu patients from the Veterans Health Administration and compared the complications for each. 

CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE

FLU VACCINE IN KIDS REDUCES RISK OF RELATED HOSPITALIZATIONS, STUDY FINDS

“The percentage of COVID-19 patients who died while hospitalized (21.0%) was more than five times that of influenza [flu] patients (3.8%), and the duration of hospitalization was almost three times longer for COVID-19 patients,” the authors wrote. Also, the percentage of coronavirus patients who were sent to the intensive care unit more than doubled flu patients.

Further, they found that coronavirus patients were at a higher risk for 17 other complications, including respiratory and neurologic issues.

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>
(iStock)

Hospitalized coronavirus patients were five times more likely to die than those hospitalized with the flu, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>
(iStock)

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES UPDATED CPR GUIDELINES THAT EMPHASIZE RECOVERY

After adjusting for variables like age and comorbidities among coronavirus patients, those from minority groups had a higher risk of nine complications, including respiratory and neurologic issues.

“The higher risk for certain complications among racial and ethnic minority patients provides further evidence that certain racial and ethnic minority groups are disproportionally affected by COVID-19 and that this disparity is not solely accounted for by age and underlying medical conditions,” authors wrote.

The coronavirus patients in the study were on average “slightly older” than the flu patients (70 vs. 69 years old, respectively), the study noted, but the flu patients had more underlying health issues.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

The CDC said health care providers need to be diligent about looking for symptoms to improve patient mortality and lower long-term disability.

Source Article

Higher Donor BMI Tied to Improved Lung Transplant Survival

Lung transplant patients who received a lung from obese donors had a 15-20% reduction in mortality at 1 year in one of the first studies to examine the impact of donor body mass index (BMI) and post-transplant survival.

Findings from the retrospective trial, which included data on patients and donors registered with the United Network for Organ Sharing Standard Transplant and Analysis database, suggest that donor obesity may confer a protective benefit for transplanted lungs.

The findings were presented this week in a poster session at the virtual CHEST conference, the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians.

The BMI of lung transplant recipients has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality, with studies showing an increased risk of death following transplant in patients who are either underweight or overweight, said Sung Choi, MD, of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, who presented the findings.

For example, in a 2017 study involving over 17,000 lung transplants performed in the U.S. from 2005 to 2016, underweight and overweight lung recipients (i.e., BMI ≤20 and ≥28 at the time of listing) were found to be at increased risk for both short- and long-term mortality.

Recipient weight-loss prior to lung transplantation was also associated with a reduction in mortality and days on mechanical ventilation in a 2015 study, with greater reductions in BMI associated with greater survival benefit.

And, in a 2014 consensus statement, the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation recommended that a BMI of 30 or greater be considered a relative contraindication to lung transplantation.

Regarding donor BMI, however, Choi told MedPage Today that there hasn’t been prior research examining the impact on lung recipient outcomes and that the findings from his team’s study were a surprise: “We really weren’t expecting this result,” he said.

“We thought greater donor BMI might be associated with an increase in recipient mortality or maybe a null finding. What we found was striking to us. There appeared to be a dose-dependent relationship, with higher donor BMI associated with lower recipient mortality at 90 days and 1 year after the transplant,” Choi said.

Close to 16,000 adult patients who received single- or double-lung transplants from 2005 to 2018 were included in the analysis. Median age of the lung recipients was 59, and roughly 60% were male. Donors were categorized as underweight (BMI <18.5), normal weight (18.5 to <25), overweight (25 to <30), class I obesity (30 to <35), class II obesity (35 to <40), and class III obesity (≥40.0).

Average donor BMI was 25.9, and 45% were classified as normal weight.

A survival benefit at 1 year was observed among patients who received a lung transplant from donors in obesity class 1 (HR 0.867, 95% CI 0.772-0.975, P<0.01) and obesity classes II/III (HR 0.804, 95% CI 0.688-0.941, P<0.01) compared with lungs from normal-weight donors, the researchers reported.

In adjusted analyses, the team reported lower odds of survival with increased donor age, male sex, and presence of diabetes.

Lifelong atrial fibrillation risk may be higher for big babies

Parents are usually pleased when their newborn seems big and strong, but new research suggests that large babies may be at higher risk for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation later in life.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is the most common heart rhythm disorder, affecting more than 40 million people worldwide. People with a-fib have a five times increased risk of stroke.

The association between birth weight and a-fib is controversial, which led the authors of this study to investigate it.

Using a special data analysis technique, the researchers concluded that there was a link between greater birth weight and an increased risk of a-fib later in life.

Specifically, people with a birth weight that’s 1 pound above the average 7.5 pounds are 30% more likely to develop a-fib, the findings showed.

The study is scheduled to be presented Monday at a virtual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

“Our results suggest that the risk of atrial fibrillation in adulthood may be higher for large newborns [over 8 pounds, 13 ounces] than those with normal birth weight,” said study author Songzan Chen, from Zhejiang University, in Hangzhou, China.

“Preventing elevated birth weight could be a novel way to avoid atrial fibrillation in offspring — for example with a balanced diet and regular check-ups during pregnancy, particularly for women who are overweight, obese or have diabetes,” Chen suggested in a meeting news release.

“People born with a high weight should adopt a healthy lifestyle to lower their likelihood of developing the heart rhythm disorder,” Chen recommended.

According to Michel Komajda, a past president of the ESC, “Atrial fibrillation is a devastating illness that causes avoidable strokes if left untreated. We know that people with unhealthy lifestyles are more likely to develop atrial fibrillation, and risk can be lowered through physical activity and keeping body weight under control. This study is a welcome addition to our knowledge about how to prevent atrial fibrillation.”

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on atrial fibrillation.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source Article

Big Babies May Face Higher Lifelong A-Fib Risk | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Parents are usually pleased when their newborn seems big and strong, but new research suggests that large babies may be at higher risk for the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation later in life.

Atrial fibrillation (a-fib) is the most common heart rhythm disorder, affecting more than 40 million people worldwide. People with a-fib have a five times increased risk of stroke.

The association between birth weight and a-fib is controversial, which led the authors of this study to investigate it.

Using a special data analysis technique, the researchers concluded that there was a link between greater birth weight and an increased risk of a-fib later in life.

Specifically, people with a birth weight that’s 1 pound above the average 7.5 pounds are 30% more likely to develop a-fib, the findings showed.

The study is scheduled to be presented Monday at a virtual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

“Our results suggest that the risk of atrial fibrillation in adulthood may be higher for large newborns [over 8 pounds, 13 ounces] than those with normal birth weight,” said study author Songzan Chen, from Zhejiang University, in Hangzhou, China.

“Preventing elevated birth weight could be a novel way to avoid atrial fibrillation in offspring — for example with a balanced diet and regular check-ups during pregnancy, particularly for women who are overweight, obese or have diabetes,” Chen suggested in a meeting news release.

“People born with a high weight should adopt a healthy lifestyle to lower their likelihood of developing the heart rhythm disorder,” Chen recommended.

According to Michel Komajda, a past president of the ESC, “Atrial fibrillation is a devastating illness that causes avoidable strokes if left untreated. We know that people with unhealthy lifestyles are more likely to develop atrial fibrillation, and risk can be lowered through physical activity and keeping body weight under control. This study is a welcome addition to our knowledge about how to prevent atrial fibrillation.”

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source Article

Data Presented at TCT Connect Finds Pre-PCI Use of Impella for AMI Cardiogenic Shock is Associated with Higher Survival, Particularly in Women

Two studies of AMI cardiogenic shock (AMICS) patients found higher survival when Impella was placed pre-PCI, compared to when Impella was placed after PCI. The findings were presented at TCT Connect, the 32nd annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201016005118/en/

Figure 1 (Graphic: Business Wire)

In the first study, presented by Hemindermeet Singh, MD, of Ascension St. John Hospital, researchers compared 649 patients from two cohorts: a recent cohort (2017–2019) from the RECOVER III post-market approval (PMA) study, after the widespread adoption of the best practice of placing Impella pre-PCI, and a cohort from before PMA (2008–2014) when the practice of placing Impella pre-PCI was not yet widely adopted. Researchers found an 18% relative improvement in overall survival in the recent cohort, indicating an associated benefit to placing Impella pre-PCI. The recent cohort also had lower incidences of peri-PCI acute kidney injury (AKI) and major bleeding or vascular complications. This is despite a higher prevalence of hypertension, smoking, stroke, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV heart failure in the recent cohort. (see figure 1)

“This data shows increased adoption of the cardiogenic shock best practices over the last three years has led to an improvement in overall survival rates,” said Amir Kaki, MD, the study’s senior author, an interventional cardiologist and director of mechanical circulatory support at Ascension St. John Hospital. “In order to improve outcomes for our patients, it is important for practitioners to apply these best practices, which include early identification of shock, use of a right heart cath, reduction of toxic inotropes and use of Impella prior to the PCI.”

“Our study demonstrates growing physician and institutional experience. The implementation of standardized cardiogenic shock protocols and the increasing use of strategies to reduce vascular and bleeding complications are associated with better survival. In-depth understanding of these factors has significant potential of improving outcomes in cardiogenic shock patients in the community at large,” said Dr. Singh.

The second study, presented by Tayyab Shah, MD, of the Yale School of Medicine, analyzed data collected from the RECOVER III trial between 2017-2019. It found that placing Impella pre-PCI in AMICS patients is associated with higher survival than placing Impella post-PCI, especially in women. Study investigators determined women had a 74% relative survival benefit with Impella use pre-PCI as compared to post-PCI. The study authors conclude early implantation of Impella provides a significant survival benefit, particularly to women. (see figure 2)

“This study suggests that the early use of the Impella device to support patients in cardiogenic shock, before PCI and inotrope/vasopressor usage, may provide a survival benefit particularly to females,” said Dr. Shah. “This is an interesting result from an observational study with meaningful clinical implications, which need to be further explored in the upcoming RECOVER IV randomized controlled trial.”

Since FDA PMA approval, Abiomed (NASDAQ: ABMD) has collected data on nearly 100% of U.S. Impella patients in the observational

Younger women at higher risk for death after heart attack

Younger women who suffer a heart attack are more likely than men to die in the decade after surgery, a new study finds.

It included more than 400 women and nearly 1,700 men, average age 45, who had a first heart attack between 2000 and 2016.

During an average follow-up of more than 11 years, there were no statistically significant differences between men and women for deaths while in the hospital, or for heart-related deaths.

However, women had a 1.6-fold increased risk of dying from other causes during the follow-up, according to the study published this week in the European Heart Journal.

“Cardiovascular deaths occurred in 73 men and 21 women, 4.4% versus 5.3% respectively, over a median follow-up time of 11.2 years,” said study leader Dr. Ron Blankstein, a preventive cardiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“However, when excluding deaths that occurred in the hospital, there were 157 deaths in men and 54 deaths in women from all causes during the follow-up period: 9.5% versus 13.5% respectively, which is a significant difference, and a greater proportion of women died from causes other than cardiovascular problems, 8.4% versus 5.4% respectively,” Blankstein said in a journal news release.

The study also found that women were less likely than men to undergo invasive procedures after admission to the hospital with a heart attack, or to be treated with certain medications when they were discharged, such as aspirin, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins.

“It’s important to note that overall most heart attacks in people under the age of 50 occur in men. Only 19% of the people in this study were women. However, women who experience a heart attack at a young age often present with similar symptoms as men, are more likely to have diabetes, have lower socioeconomic status and ultimately are more likely to die in the longer term,” Blankstein noted.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on heart attacks.

Copyright 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Source Article