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Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn't Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images / Doucefleur
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn't Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images/iStockphoto
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit

Every morning before I sit down to work, I fill up a large mason jar with ice water. And after I finish the liquid (and give myself a pat on the back), I go to town chomping on the ice. I realize that the sound of ice on teeth might make some cringe, but it’s never bothered me – I’ve always figured that I’m just consuming more water.

Much to my surprise, though, my dentist probably wouldn’t be too thrilled about my ice chewing habit.

“When I’m asked to name a food that has a high potential to cause trouble, I call out chewing ice as an issue,” Dr. Matt Messina, DDS, an ADA spokesperson, says. “Ice is a crystal and tooth enamel is a crystal. When you push two crystals against each other, one will break.”

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The somewhat good news is that Dr. Messina says that most of the time, the thing that breaks is the ice – however, sometimes it can be a tooth or a filling. “And that’s a self-inflicted injury,” Dr. Messina adds.

Along with unpopped popcorn kernels, Dr. Messina says ice is the most common culprit for broken teeth. “However, most of the time, a broken tooth or filling was in the process of failing and whatever you were eating was just the last straw.” Basically, you’re taking a risk.

Not going to lie – for me, that pile of ice on the bottom of my mason jar isn’t so appetizing anymore. Looks like I’ll be letting it melt, or leaving it out entirely, from now on.

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Why the U.S. doesn’t have an at-home coronavirus test yet

Fast at-home coronavirus tests could help bring the United States’ surging outbreak under control — if companies developing the tests can convince regulators that the public can be trusted to use them correctly.

Several firms are vying to be the first to market a test that Americans could buy over the counter with results delivered in minutes at a bedside or a breakfast table. That could allow people to screen themselves before heading to the office or school, relieving pressure on overburdened testing laboratories and quickly identifying new infections.

But concerns about the tests’ reliability, how consumers might react to their results and how public health departments will track them have slowed their development.

Companies formulating such tests say they won’t seek emergency authorization from the Food and Drug Administration until later this year or early next — in part because the agency wants them to prove that adults of different ages, education levels and English proficiency can successfully use their products.

Public health experts say FDA’s caution is warranted, because a test that’s unreliable or hard to use could help the virus spread. There is also a risk that many people will interpret a negative result as an all-clear; in reality, even the best test will produce some false negatives. And even a true negative does not guarantee that a person is not in the early stages of infection.

“If this was a disease that only impacted the individual, then it wouldn’t be such a problem,” said Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association. “The problem is that there will be a cohort of people who will take the test, find out that they are presumably negative, but they really weren’t, and go out and infect other people.”

A false negative result could be especially dangerous if “people use it to decide whether to go to parties,” said Heather Pierce, senior director for science policy at the Association of American Medical Colleges. “You’ve got infected people feeling like they have a passport to not engage in the other public health measures that we need to suppress the virus.”

False positive results are also a concern, because some people could isolate for up to two weeks, missing work or school for no reason. But that risk could be lowered with follow-up lab-based testing, and pales in comparison to at-home tests’ potential to prevent Covid-19 spread, said HHS testing czar Brett Giroir.

Medical personnel prepare to administer a COVID-19 swab at a drive-through testing site in Lawrence, N.Y., Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020. The rate of COVID-19 infections has risen enough in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut to require those states' residents to quarantine if they travel to New York, but Gov. Andrew Cuomo says New York won't enforce the rules against those residents. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Medical personnel prepare to administer a COVID-19 swab at a drive-through testing site in Lawrence, N.Y., Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020. The rate of COVID-19 infections has risen enough in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut to require those states’ residents to quarantine if they travel to New York, but Gov. Andrew Cuomo says New York won’t enforce the rules against those residents. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

There is little precedent for at-home infectious disease testing. The FDA has only approved one such test — for HIV, made by OraSure Technologies — that does not require oversight

Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images / Doucefleur
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images/iStockphoto
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit

Every morning before I sit down to work, I fill up a large mason jar with ice water. And after I finish the liquid (and give myself a pat on the back), I go to town chomping on the ice. I realize that the sound of ice on teeth might make some cringe, but it’s never bothered me – I’ve always figured that I’m just consuming more water.

Much to my surprise, though, my dentist probably wouldn’t be too thrilled about my ice chewing habit.

“When I’m asked to name a food that has a high potential to cause trouble, I call out chewing ice as an issue,” Dr. Matt Messina, DDS, an ADA spokesperson, says. “Ice is a crystal and tooth enamel is a crystal. When you push two crystals against each other, one will break.”

The somewhat good news is that Dr. Messina says that most of the time, the thing that breaks is the ice – however, sometimes it can be a tooth or a filling. “And that’s a self-inflicted injury,” Dr. Messina adds.

Along with unpopped popcorn kernels, Dr. Messina says ice is the most common culprit for broken teeth. “However, most of the time, a broken tooth or filling was in the process of failing and whatever you were eating was just the last straw.” Basically, you’re taking a risk.

Not going to lie – for me, that pile of ice on the bottom of my mason jar isn’t so appetizing anymore. Looks like I’ll be letting it melt, or leaving it out entirely, from now on.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Ukrainian Fitness Influencer Who Told His Followers That Covid-19 Doesn’t Exist Dies of Coronavirus



a person wearing a mask


© Ritu Singh | India.com Viral News Desk



Popular Ukrainian fitness influencer Dmitriy Stuzhuk, who denied the existence of coronavirus and called it ‘hoax’, has succumbed to the deadly virus. Stuzhuk reportedly contracted the disease during a trip to Turkey and was taken to hospital when he landed in Ukraine after testing positive for coronavirus. After being in the hospital for eight days, he was allowed for home treatment on October 15. However, the next day, he has rushed to the hospital again, after he had problems with his cardiovascular system. The 33-year-old social media star’s ex-wife, Sofia Stuzhuk, announced his death in a heartbreaking Instagram post on Saturday. “I did everything I could so the father of my three children lives. But nothing depends on me now. Dima is no longer with us. His heart could not stand,” she wrote.

“You are our guardian angel and your love will always protect our angels. How painful it is to realize… Blessed memory of you, Dima Stuzhuk.”

After becoming ill, he shared the news to his fans saying: “As you all know from stories, I am sick with coronavirus. Today, after returning home, for the first time there was an enthusiasm for at least writing something. I want to share how I got sick and convincingly warn everyone: I also thought that there was no covid… Until I got sick.”

“COVID-19 IS NOT A SHORT-LIVED DISEASE! And it is heavy,” he added. Notably, Dmitriy and Sofia Stuzhuk split up six months ago but they have three children, the youngest just nine months old.

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The ‘long-haulers’: Why ‘presumed recovered’ doesn’t mean you’re done with the coronavirus | Coronavirus

Dr. Shaban Faruqui, strapped into a gurney, rolled down the hallway five months ago at Baton Rouge General Medical Center to cheers and applause from the hospital’s employees.

It was May 18, two months after he was hospitalized with the coronavirus. As the former chief of gastroenterology at the hospital, everyone had been rooting for him.

He had survived the worst of it and was going home. To a wife of 45 years, to three daughters and four grandchildren who had hung paintings of hearts and sunny skies on the walls of his Baton Rouge home to greet him.



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Dr. Shaban Faruqui and his wife and three daughters in 2015. 




When he arrived home in the ambulance, Faruqui’s fingers fluttered with urgency when he saw his wife. She grabbed his hand. A doctor herself, she would oversee his care as he recovered.

That day marked what the Faruqui family thought would be the end of a long struggle with the coronavirus.

It wasn’t.

What they didn’t realize then, and what is becoming clear to some other coronavirus patients and their families, is that the fight for survival doesn’t end when a patient leaves the hospital.

Presumed recovered

On the Louisiana Department of Health website, a hopeful green number ticks up each week in the left corner of the state’s coronavirus dashboard. It represents the many “presumed recovered” people who survived their initial infection. There are 161,792 of them in Louisiana as of the most recent count.

The state considers someone recovered if they meet one of two criteria. Either it has been more than 14 days since they tested positive and they aren’t in a hospital or dead, or if they are still alive 21 days after a positive test.

The assumption baked into the dashboard is that people are through the worst of the infection if they’re out of the hospital or a few weeks out from the initial sickness. The majority of people recover in that time period.

But the metric was created before there was an understanding of the continuing coronavirus-related symptoms that some people face. And more and more, doctors say that many of those “presumed recovered” patients still are far from certain to have a full recovery.

“I don’t presume all those people are recovered. A lot of those people are still sick,” said Dr. Josh Denson, a pulmonologist who in March treated the first severe case of COVID-19 that occurred at University Medical Center in New Orleans.



How a 31-year-old New Orleans coronavirus survivor died from a rarely seen condition weeks later

A 31-year-old woman checked in to a New Orleans hospital this spring after five days of fever, cough and stomach pain. Hospital workers stuck …

While COVID-19 affects the respiratory system — shortness of breath, low blood oxygen, pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome in severe cases — mounting evidence shows it can impact a number of different organs, in some cases leaving behind undetectable damage or persistent problems that can turn severe weeks later.

Some of these people are