Tag: Daily

 

US Coronavirus: The US topped 1,000 daily Covid-19 deaths and experts worry the worst of the fall surge is yet to come

At least 31 states are now reporting more new Covid-19 cases than the previous week and only one state — Hawaii — is trending in the right direction. Hospitalizations are also on the rise, with tens of thousands of patients nationwide and hospital systems already taking a hard hit.

In other words, it’s going to be “a horrible winter,” according to Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine.

Experts say the coming months will be especially challenging for several reasons. The country never got down to a low daily case baseline before entering the colder seasons, meaning new infections will be building on an already rampant spread of the virus. As gatherings move indoors, the virus is more likely to spread.

The surge also comes after many schools and universities reopened, and college towns and campuses all over the country reported outbreaks.
And then, there are the upcoming holidays that are making public health officials nervous. With household gatherings already helping drive the surge of cases, experts worry large celebrations will continue to fuel the spread within American communities. Virtual celebrations are the safest route, infectious disease experts said Wednesday.
Passengers prepare to board a plane at the Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, Arizona on October 13, 2020

States announce bleak milestones

As the country’s cases move in an upward trajectory, more states reported grim new milestones this week.

Ohio reported more than 2,300 new infections Wednesday, the highest number since the pandemic began, state health officials told CNN.

Utah heart attack victim competes for medical care amid surge in Covid-19 cases
In Wisconsin, the governor announced the first patient was admitted Wednesday to the field hospital that opened in response to a surge of Covid-19 patients.

“We are thankful to have this facility available to Wisconsinites and our hospitals, but also saddened that this is where Wisconsin is at today,” Gov. Tony Evers said in a news release.

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Wednesday the state added more than 1,000 daily infections and its hospitalizations are at the highest they have been in three months.

And there are alarming patterns coming out of the Dakotas as well.

North Dakota is seeing an average of more than 101 new cases per 100,000 people every day — the highest per capita new case rate of any state so far in the pandemic, according to the COVID Tracking Project. To put that into perspective: that would be like California averaging nearly 40,000 new cases daily.

South Dakota holds the second highest rate of new cases per 100,000 in the country, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

It doesn’t have to be this way

There’s still time to turn things around, officials have said, with the help of basic public health measures touted by experts for months.
Covid-19 vaccine trials won't tell us if the shots save lives, expert notes

Those include masks and social distancing. Updated guidance from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on close contact emphasize just how critical face coverings are.

The CDC’s new definition of a close contact with a Covid-19 patient includes exposures adding up to a total of 15 minutes spent six feet or closer to an infected

US is nearing ‘rapid acceleration’ of Covid-19 cases, expert warns, as daily infections top 60,000

A leading health expert says US Covid-19 cases will begin to rapidly accelerate in a week as the country topped 60,000 new infections Tuesday — triple what the daily average was back in June, when restrictions had begun to ease.



a car parked in a parking lot: People in cars wait in line for Covid-19 testing in Reading, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday morning, October 13.


© Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle/Getty Images
People in cars wait in line for Covid-19 testing in Reading, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday morning, October 13.

The prediction comes after several state leaders reimposed some measures to help curb the spread of the virus, fueled by small gatherings increasingly moving indoors with the colder weather, as well as other factors such as college and school reopenings. The national seven-day case average has increased at least 18% since the previous week and is now a staggering 61% higher than what it was five weeks ago. And as multiple experts have warned, things will likely get worse before they get better.

“It’s going to be a difficult fall and winter,” Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration, told CNBC Monday. “I think we’re about two or three weeks behind Europe — so we’re about a week away from starting to enter a period where we’re going to see a rapid acceleration in cases.”

The difference is many European countries were able to suppress their numbers of new cases over the summer, but the US entered the fall season with a relatively high baseline average of new infections — something experts warned wouldn’t help in containing another surge of cases. Dr. Anthony Fauci said earlier this week European Union countries were able to bring their baseline down because of strict and stringent lockdowns, adding the US did not “shut down nearly as much as our colleagues in Italy and Spain.”

Ahead of bleak outlooks of the coming weeks, hospitalizations in the US have also began to rise, with more than 39,000 Covid-19 patients nationwide, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

“We’re seeing hospitalizations go up in 42 states right now, cases are going up in 45 states, and there really is no backstop,” Gottlieb said. “This fall and winter season is when the coronavirus is going to want to spread.”

‘Get ready:’ 70,000 new infections daily

At least 26 US states are reporting more new Covid-19 cases than the previous week, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. And no states are trending in the right direction, according to the data.

By next week or the week after that, the US could be recording up to 70,000 new cases daily, Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, said Tuesday. And the numbers could keep rising after that, he said.

“Look out for your mental health, because the normal response to this is people are going to get sad and upset, and maybe even depressed, so have access to mental health counseling,” Hotez said. “In other words, put those belts and suspenders in and get ready.”

Video: Infectious diseases expert blasts

Trudeau debunks COVID-19 ‘internment camp’ misinformation and rumours; Ontario’s daily case count jumps up over 800

For more on today’s top stories and the spread of the novel coronavirus across the country, please refer to our live updates below throughout the day, as well as our COVID-19 news hub.

PM addresses disinformation, misinformation around COVID-19

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau commented on the amount of misinformation circulating about COVID-19 and the government’s response, including claims that there will be coronavirus internment camps in Canada.

The rumour began during Question Period on October 7, when Ontario MPP Randy Hillier asked if quarantine sites meant for incoming travellers who have no other place to quarantine were to be turned into “internment camps.”

Buzz spread of the false allegation, which was debunked by Trudeau today.

“We’ve seen over the past number of years a rise in concerted efforts around misinformation and disinformation on a broad range of subjects, designed to undermine people’s confidence in their institutions, in their democracies,” Trudeau said. “Some are foreign actors trying to disrupt successful democracies, others are people with extremist agendas.”

“As a government, we need to continue to stand strong, particularly during a public health crisis where the best thing Canadians can do is listen to experts, listen to doctors.”

The prime minister added that there is a “tremendous amount of noise and harmful misinformation” on the internet but Canadians need to continue to look to trusted sources of information, like Canada’s chief public health officer and regional health authorities.

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, said misinformation and disinformation does not help public health officials and the collective system has tried, through various means, to provide credible information to the public.

“I think there’s a part for almost everyone,” Dr. Tam said. “There’s a part for journalists who are in this room to help reveal the sort of tactics and measures that are at play, including bots and other aspects of what’s actually happening in the social media space.”

She added that there is also a role for social media platforms, who have put some measures in place like directing people to credible sites if people are using certain searches and taking down some “outrageous” disinformation.

Dr. Tam stressed that when individuals are looking at information, they need to ask themselves where it came from and if it’s credible.

“Be media smart as well as science smart,” Canada’s chief public health officer said.

In advance of a viable COVID-19 vaccine, Dr. Tam indicated Canada needs to “immunize the population against [misinformation and disinformation] before the vaccine arrives.” This includes providing information on the safety measures and rigorous processes of regulatory authorities.

She added that getting a better understanding of why people spread misinformation and disinformation is also important.

CASES AND OUTBREAKS

Ontario sees spike in daily COVID-19 cases

Ontario reported 821 new confirmed COVID-19 cases on Tuesday, the highest daily total since surpassing 900 cases in early October. The province also identified three more COVID-19 deaths.

Of the new cases, 327 are Toronto, 136 in Peel, 64 in

Selexipag Has No Effect on Daily Activity in PAH Patients

Selexipag (Uptravi) does not change the level of daily activity of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), results from the phase 4 TRACE trial suggest.



Luke Howard

“We had no preconceived idea if this drug would improve exercise capacity,” said Luke Howard, MD, from Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust in London. It was clear, however, that 6-minute walk tests conducted a few times a year “don’t paint a picture of what daily life is like for patients on selexipag.”

The oral prostacyclin IP receptor agonist is prescribed to slow the progression of PAH and reduce hospital admissions, but there are no studies that show whether it improves quality of life.

Howard and his team turned to wearable technology to “capture a snapshot of everyday life,” he explained during his presentation at CHEST 2020.

The primary concern of the investigators was to get TRACE participants — all with PAH — to wear a wrist device; they did not encourage patients to become more active. “We wanted a true picture of the impact of the drug itself,” he noted.

After 24 months of daily tracking, “there was no benefit to increased daily activity for patients taking this drug,” Howard told Medscape Medical News. “That was a bit deflating.”

The daily activity of TRACE participants was “slightly more elevated” in the selexipag group than in the placebo group. “We saw some numerical drops in activity in the placebo group, and a trend that might make a difference over a longer, bigger study, but not in a statically significant way,” he reported.

In the randomized, blinded trial — the first to track the activity of PAH patients — 53 participants received selexipag and 55 received placebo. All 108 wore a wrist accelerometer (GT9X Link) that counted the number of steps taken each day, providing an indication of daily activity.

Device compliance — the mean number of days in which the device was worn for at least 7 hours during a 14-day predrug period — was similar in the selexipag and placebo groups (13.2 vs 13.0 days).

Baseline Characteristics of the TRACE Participants
Measure Selexipag Group Placebo Group
Median time from diagnosis, months 38 34
Mean 6-minute walk distance, m 453.1 449.5
WHO class II PAH, % 62.3 74.5

“We wanted to make sure we had people who were stable and weren’t enrolled in a rehabilitation program; we didn’t want any competing influences,” Howard explained. All in all, the participants were in pretty good shape. “There was a low risk of a bad outcome.”

The primary end point was change in activity from baseline to week 24. The secondary end points were PAH-SYMPACT health quality-of-life tests and 6-minute walk distance.

Similar Activity Levels in Both Groups

Change in Activity From Baseline to Week 24
Activity Selexipag Group Placebo Group
Nonsedentary activity, min –0.7 –15.0
Steps, n –32 –171
6-minute walk distance, m 18.3 9.8

As expected in a population in which the majority of patients meet the criteria for WHO FC II PAH, all

Daily case numbers are at levels not seen since the summer, and 14 states recently have set hospitalization records

Daily coronavirus case numbers in the US are at levels not seen since the summer, and more than a dozen states set record highs for Covid-19 hospitalizations in the past week — yet more evidence, experts say, of a difficult fall and winter ahead.



a person sitting at a desk in an office chair: NEW YORK, NEW YORK - OCTOBER 05: A person walks through the Brooklyn neighborhood of Borough Park on October 05, 2020 in New York City. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans to close nonessential businesses and schools in nine neighborhoods, including Borough Park, where the rate of positive COVID-19 cases have been higher than three percent in the past seven days. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)


© Spencer Platt/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NEW YORK – OCTOBER 05: A person walks through the Brooklyn neighborhood of Borough Park on October 05, 2020 in New York City. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans to close nonessential businesses and schools in nine neighborhoods, including Borough Park, where the rate of positive COVID-19 cases have been higher than three percent in the past seven days. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The country’s seven-day average of new daily cases was above 58,300 as of Monday — a level not seen since the first week of August, and climbing closer to the summer’s peak of 67,200 on July 22.

Average daily cases have soared 70% since September 12, when the country was at a two-month low of about 34,300.

As cold weather is likely to drive more gatherings indoors, the case level appears too high to avoid dangerous levels of infections and hospitalizations in the coming weeks, experts have said.

“(With) the fact that we’re only going to see more transmission occur with indoor air, people inside, this is going to be a rough fall,” Michael Osterholm, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, told CNN on Tuesday.

Case rates and hospitalizations are rising especially in the Midwest, Great Plains and parts of the West.

Fourteen states reported their peak Covid-19 hospitalizations in the last week: Alaska, Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Montana, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, West Virginia and Wisconsin, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

The virus’s prevalence is bad enough that the director for the National Institutes for Health says his family won’t gather for Thanksgiving this year.

“It is just not safe to take that kind of chance with people coming from different parts of the country of uncertain status,” Dr. Francis Collins told National Public Radio’s “Morning Edition” on Tuesday. “The problem with this disease is it is so easy for people to be infected and not know it, and then spread it to the ones next to them without realizing it.”

“All of this, I’m afraid, happens because we have not succeeded in this country in introducing really effective public health measures,” Collins said.

“Simple things that we all could be doing: Wear your mask, keep that six foot distance, and don’t congregate indoors, whatever you do, and wash your hands. And yet people are tired of it and yet the virus is not tired of us,” Collins said.

The country has now topped 220,000 Covid-19 deaths, a number some experts worry may also begin to climb faster.

“The numbers are moving in the wrong direction,” Dr. Tom Inglesby, the director of the Johns Hopkins

The Latest: India Has Lowest Daily Virus Deaths in 3 Months | World News

NEW DELHI — India has reported 579 fatalities from COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, the lowest increase in three months, driving its death toll to 114,610.

The Health Ministry on Monday also reported 55,722 new cases of coronavirus infection, raising India’s total to more than 7.5 million, second in the world behind the U.S.

A government-appointed committee of scientists said Sunday the epidemic may have peaked in India and the disease was likely to “run its course” by February 2021 if people used masks and adhered to physical distancing measures.

The number of new infections confirmed each day has declined for a month. The committee said even if active cases increased during the upcoming festive season and cold weather, they were unlikely to surpass India’s record daily high of 97,894 cases.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Congress is past the point it can deliver more coronavirus relief before the election, with Washington’s differences proving insurmountable

— China’s economy accelerates as virus recover gains strength

— US can now screen millions daily with growing supply of rapid tests, but challenge will be keeping track of the results

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea on Monday began testing tens of thousands of employees of hospitals and nursing homes to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks at live-in facilities.

Fifteen of the 76 latest cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency were from Busan, where more than 70 infections have been linked to a hospital for the elderly. The disease caused by the coronavirus can be more serious in older people.

Health workers have been scrambling to track infections in the Seoul metropolitan area, home to about half of the country’s 51 million people, as the virus spreads in a variety of places, including hospitals, churches, schools and workplaces.

From Monday, they will start a process to test 130,000 workers at hospitals, nursing homes and senior centers in the greater capital area. Officials will also test 30,000 patients who have visited and used these facilities, but will leave out hospitalized patients, who already receive tests when they are admitted.

Officials plan to complete the tests within October and could possibly expand the screening to other regions if needed.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source Article

India has lowest daily virus deaths in 3 months

NEW DELHI — India has reported 579 fatalities from COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, the lowest increase in three months, driving its death toll to 114,610.

The Health Ministry on Monday also reported 55,722 new cases of coronavirus infection, raising India’s total to more than 7.5 million, second in the world behind the U.S.

A government-appointed committee of scientists said Sunday the epidemic may have peaked in India and the disease was likely to “run its course” by February 2021 if people used masks and adhered to physical distancing measures.

The number of new infections confirmed each day has declined for a month. The committee said even if active cases increased during the upcoming festive season and cold weather, they were unlikely to surpass India’s record daily high of 97,894 cases.

___


HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Congress is past the point it can deliver more coronavirus relief before the election, with Washington’s differences proving insurmountable

— China’s economy accelerates as virus recover gains strength

— US can now screen millions daily with growing supply of rapid tests, but challenge will be keeping track of the results

— Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

___

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea on Monday began testing tens of thousands of employees of hospitals and nursing homes to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks at live-in facilities.

Fifteen of the 76 latest cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency were from Busan, where more than 70 infections have been linked to a hospital for the elderly. The disease caused by the coronavirus can be more serious in older people.

Health workers have been scrambling to track infections in the Seoul metropolitan area, home to about half of the country’s 51 million people, as the virus spreads in a variety of places, including hospitals, churches, schools and workplaces.

From Monday, they will start a process to test 130,000 workers at hospitals, nursing homes and senior centers in the greater capital area. Officials will also test 30,000 patients who have visited and used these facilities, but will leave out hospitalized patients, who already receive tests when they are admitted.

Officials plan to complete the tests within October and could possibly expand the screening to other regions if needed.

Source Article

Europe crosses 150,000 daily coronavirus cases mark, a week after reporting 100,000 daily cases

By Anurag Maan

(Reuters) – Europe surpassed 150,000 daily coronavirus cases on Friday just a week after reporting 100,000 cases for the first time, according to Reuters tally, with countries such as France, Germany reporting record daily numbers of infections this week.

Much of Europe has tightened curbs including measures such as shutting or ordering early closing of bars, but now the surging infection rates are also testing governments’ resolve to keep schools and non-COVID medical care going.

Globally, cases rose by more than 400,000 for the first time late on Friday, a record one-day increase.

As a region, Europe is reporting more daily cases than India, Brazil and the United States combined. The increase is partly explained by far more testing than was done in the first wave of the pandemic.

The United Kingdom, France, Russia, Netherlands, Germany and Spain accounted for about half of Europe’s new cases this week, according to a Reuters tally.

France, which is reporting the highest seven-day average of new cases in Europe with 21,210 infections per day, reported a record 30,621 cases on Thursday, according to the tally.

In the past seven days it has registered nearly 142,800 new infections, more than the 132,430 registered during the entire two-month lockdown from mid-March to mid-May.

French President Emmanuel Macron ordered a third of France’s population be put under nightly curfew on Wednesday, with the measure taking effect from Saturday.

The United Kingdom is reporting a seven-day average of 16,228 new cases per day, and has introduced a tiered system of tougher restrictions in some areas.

Germany has reported new daily records three times this week, reporting more than 7,000 daily cases for the first time on Thursday. It reported a record 7,830 new cases on Saturday, according to the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases.

By European standards, Germany has experienced relatively low infection and death rates so far during the pandemic, but Chancellor Angela Merkel has warned there could be 19,200 infections per day if current trends continue.

Europe currently has recorded over 17% of total global coronavirus cases and nearly 22% of deaths worldwide.

The five countries reporting the most deaths in Europe are the United Kingdom (43,429), Italy (36,427), Spain (33,775), France (33,134) and Russia (23,723), according to a Reuters tally.

(Reporting by Anurag Maan in Bengaluru; Editing by Frances Kerry)

Source Article

Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, October 17: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the world


As healthcare workers throughout the country continue to battle coronavirus, Harborview Medical Center in Seattle confirmed Friday an outbreak in a surgical unit has infected four patients, killing one. Ten Harborview staffers have tested positive for the virus, and 30 more are in quarantine after possible exposure.

Chances remain low, however, that a vaccine for the virus will be approved before Election Day — and on Friday, pharmaceutical corporation Pfizer Inc. announced it cannot request emergency authorization of its vaccine before the third week of November.

Throughout Saturday, on this page, we’ll post updates on the pandemic and its effects on the Seattle area, the Pacific Northwest and the world. Updates from Friday are here, and all our coronavirus coverage can be found here.

(Jennifer Luxton / The Seattle Times)

The coronavirus pandemic sidelined many Seattle-area food trucks. Here’s how the survivors made it

Lorelei Johnston, manager of the BeanFish food truck, pushes a cart toward the kitchen where she picks up supplies for the day ahead. The food truck stays overnight at Chop Kitchens in White Center, the commissary where food trucks park and where owners and their employees do kitchen prep. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)
Lorelei Johnston, manager of the BeanFish food truck, pushes a cart toward the kitchen where she picks up supplies for the day ahead. The food truck stays overnight at Chop Kitchens in White Center, the commissary where food trucks park and where owners and their employees do kitchen prep. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

If you’ve ever wondered what happens to a food truck in a global pandemic, swing by Chop Kitchens in White Center. 

Before COVID-19, the commercial commissary was a bustling mother ship for nine food trucks. The vendors prepped their meals in the big commercial kitchen, raced out to crowded spots like South Lake Union or a farmers market or a festival and returned a few hours later — often just as others were leaving for evening shifts. “It was just nonstop,” recalls Avery Hardin, who launched his Layers Sandwich Co. truck with his wife Ashley at Chop Kitchens last fall. 

All that changed when COVID-19 came to town this spring. Office parks became ghost towns. Festivals canceled and diners hunkered down at home. The food truck bubble collapsed like a mishandled soufflé. 

Today, just four of Chop Kitchens’ 10 current tenants take their trucks out with any regularity, say owners Vatsana Nouanthongme, 53, and Montanee Suthanasereporn, 44, two former truck vendors who opened the commissary in 2017 in an old Dairy Queen. Most of the rest of the big trucks, each of which can represent investments of $75,000 or more, now sit in the commissary’s big, fenced lot waiting for better times.

Chop Kitchens is probably a microcosm of the larger food truck business.

In King County, the official tally of “health-permitted food trucks,” which includes both trucks and trailers, fell from 460 in January 2020 to 327 as of September, according to the Washington State Food Truck Association. 

It isn’t clear how much of that decline is pandemic-related — but it’s also unclear how many of those 327 are actually operating. Anecdotally, vendors say, many trucks are either temporarily parked or working just a few days a month. 

Read the full story here.

—Paul Roberts

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Daily COVID-19 Positives Creeping Back Up

ATLANTA, GA — The daily number of new coronavirus cases in Georgia appears to be creeping back up, with 1,701 new cases reported in Friday’s daily report. That’s the highest single-day number of new cases reported since Sept. 19, when 2,218 new positive tests for COVID-19 were reported.

Friday’s total is comparable to last Friday’s total of 1,686 positives. It’s also a comparable to yesterday’s one-day total of 1,681 and the Oct. 7 one-day total of 1,537.

Numbers posted over weekends are generally lower because of lags in reporting.

Georgia also hit a milestone Friday, reporting more than 7,500 deaths total from COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus.

GEORGIA CORONAVIRUS NUMBERS FOR OCT. 16, 2020

The Georgia Department of Public Health in Atlanta reported a total of 337,850 confirmed cases of COVID-19 at 2:50 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16. According to the health department’s website, that includes 1,701 newly confirmed cases over the last 24 hours.

Georgia also reported 7,556 deaths so far from COVID-19, with 65 more deaths recorded in the last 24 hours. In addition, the state reported 30,217 hospitalizations — 136 more than the day before — and 5,614 admissions so far to intensive-care units.

No information is available from Georgia about how many patients have recovered.

Counties in or near metro Atlanta and other metropolitan areas continue to have the highest number of positives, with Fulton County still in the lead. Also, Cobb County passed 21,000 positives, DeKalb County passed 20,000 positives, and Chatham County passed 9,000 positives on Friday.

  1. Fulton County: 29,562 cases — 133 new

  2. Gwinnett County: 29,418 cases — 123 new

  3. Cobb County: 21,041 cases — 117 new

  4. DeKalb County: 20,088 cases — 119 new

  5. Hall County: 10,233 cases — 70 new

  6. Chatham County: 9,042 — 58 new

  7. Clayton County: 7,754 — 68 new

  8. Richmond County: 7,652 — 42 new

  9. Cherokee County: 6,680 — 55 new

  10. Bibb County: 6,424 — 26 new

Counties in or near metro Atlanta also continue to have the most deaths from COVID-19.

  1. Fulton County: 603 deaths — 4 new

  2. Cobb County: 446 deaths — 2 new

  3. Gwinnett County: 429 deaths — 1 new

  4. DeKalb County: 387 deaths — 3 new

  5. Dougherty County: 190 deaths — 1 new

  6. Bibb County: 186 deaths — 1 removed

  7. Chatham County: 181 deaths — 3 new

  8. Muscogee County: 173 deaths

  9. Richmond County: 173 deaths

  10. Clayton County: 171 deaths — 1 new

All Georgia statistics are available on the state’s COVID-19 website.

Globally, more than 39 million people have tested positive for COVID-19, and more than 1.1 million people have died from it, Johns Hopkins University reported Friday.

In the United States, more than 8 million people have been infected and more than 218,000 people have died from COVID-19 as of Friday. The U.S. has only about 4 percent of the world’s population but more confirmed cases and deaths than any other country.

RELATED: U.S. Coronavirus Cases Pass 8M; More Than 218,000 Deaths Reported

This article originally appeared on the East