Tag: climbing

 

US Coronavirus: Covid-19 cases are climbing in more than half of US states and these factors helped drive the surge

Among them are college and school reopenings, Dr. Tom Inglesby, the director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, told CNN Monday night. But that’s not all.

“I think there’s some, what people might say, pandemic fatigue, in some places people not really following the advice, the public health guidance that’s out there — masking, or distancing, or telecommuting. There’s more people going back to large gatherings, family gatherings.”

And those gatherings will likely multiply as the holidays approach and more people transition indoors, where the virus can spread more easily.

Across the country, more than 8.2 million people have been infected with the virus since the start of the pandemic.
At least 18 West Virginia Covid-19 outbreaks linked to church services, governor says
At least 12 states reported their highest seven-day average of daily cases Sunday, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Meanwhile, the nation’s seven-day average climbed to more than 56,000 cases — a level not seen in the past 12 weeks. And on Friday, the US reported the most new infections in a day since late July.
Hospitalizations are also on the rise, with at least 14 states reporting peak hospitalization numbers in the last week. And the country has now topped 220,000 Covid-19 deaths, a number some experts worry may also begin to climb faster.

“The numbers are moving in the wrong direction,” Inglesby said. “We see that happening as the weather gets colder, and it’s likely … to get worse.”

Only Hawaii is trending in the right direction

Across the US, at least 31 states are reporting more new cases than the previous week, according to Johns Hopkins data. Only one state — Hawaii — is trending in the right direction.
In a grim prediction for the country, Michael Osterholm, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, told NBC on Sunday that the “the next six to 12 weeks are going to be the darkest of the entire pandemic.”

In Illinois, the governor said that while the state remains better off than others across the Midwest, every region of the state “has started to move in the wrong direction.”

Covid-19 travel restrictions state by state

“We can’t wall off Illinois from the surge, but we can take extra precautions and do better than others at following the mitigations that slow the spread,” Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Monday. “Let me reiterate what I have been saying for months, ours will not be one of the states that takes no action in response to rising cases, hospitalizations, and deaths.”

In New Mexico, Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said Saturday the state was experiencing a 101% increase in Covid-19 hospitalizations this month so far.
On Monday, she tweeted if the virus “continues to exponentially spread like last week, New Mexico will not have health care and hospital capacity for every New Mexican who needs care.”

And Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves on Monday announced additional measures, including requiring hospitals to reserve capacity for Covid-19 patients as well as more targeted measures for several counties with a higher number

The country reported its most cases in a day since July. Deaths may begin climbing, too, a leading expert says

The US reported at least 69,000 new Covid-19 infections Friday — the most in a single day since July — amid an alarming nationwide rise in cases that experts say marks the start of a fall surge.



a person sitting at a table with a cake: Nursing assistant Monica Brodsky, left, and nurse Taylor Mathisen work at a drive-thru testing site for COVID-19 in the parking lot at UW Health Administrative Office Building in Middleton, Wis., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. A surge of coronavirus cases in Wisconsin and the Dakotas is forcing a scramble for hospital beds and raising political tensions, as the Upper Midwest and Plains emerge as one of the nation's most troubling hotspots. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)


© AMBER ARNOLD/AP
Nursing assistant Monica Brodsky, left, and nurse Taylor Mathisen work at a drive-thru testing site for COVID-19 in the parking lot at UW Health Administrative Office Building in Middleton, Wis., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. A surge of coronavirus cases in Wisconsin and the Dakotas is forcing a scramble for hospital beds and raising political tensions, as the Upper Midwest and Plains emerge as one of the nation’s most troubling hotspots. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)

On July 29, the US reported more than 71,300 infections, about two weeks after the country’s peak daily case count of more than 77,000. That summer surge eventually waned, and daily averages dipped to a little more than 34,300 by September 12.

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But now, the country is averaging more than 55,000 new cases daily over the past week — up more than 60% since mid-September’s dip. The case upticks have prompted state leaders to push new measures in hopes of curbing the spread of the virus.

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts announced changes to the state’s health measures, including requiring hospitals to reserve at least 10% of staffed general and ICU beds for Covid-19 patients. New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham this week ordered new mass gathering limitations and a 10 p.m. closing time for establishments serving alcohol. And in Kentucky, Gov. Andy Beshear said this month he instructed authorities to step up mask enforcement.

Hospitalizations are climbing nationwide. And they’ll likely be followed by a rise in daily Covid-19 deaths, says Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

“This is a good moment for people to stop and ask themselves, ‘What can I do to try to be sure that we limit the further infections that otherwise seem to be looming in front of us as cold weather is kicking in and people are indoors, and those curves are going upward, in the wrong direction?’ ” Collins said Friday.

Researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project more than 2,300 Americans could be dying daily by mid-January and a total of more than 389,000 people could die from the virus in the US by February 1.

The country’s daily tallies of Covid-19 deaths have been steady recently — averaging around 700 per day across a week. That’s below the peak of the summer, when the daily average hovered above 1,000 from late July into mid-August.

More than 218,000 people have died from Covid-19 nationwide since the start of the pandemic. Just over 8 million US cases have been reported.

Experts say Americans can help get the virus under control by heeding basic public health guidelines touted by officials for months: avoiding crowded settings, keeping a distance, keeping small gatherings outdoors and wearing a mask.

The US reported the most Covid-19 cases in a day since July. Deaths may begin climbing, too, a leading expert says

The US reported at least 69,000 new Covid-19 infections Friday — the most in a single day since July — amid an alarming nationwide rise in cases that experts say marks the start of the fall surge.



a person sitting at a table with a cake: Nursing assistant Monica Brodsky, left, and nurse Taylor Mathisen work at a drive-thru testing site for COVID-19 in the parking lot at UW Health Administrative Office Building in Middleton, Wis., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. A surge of coronavirus cases in Wisconsin and the Dakotas is forcing a scramble for hospital beds and raising political tensions, as the Upper Midwest and Plains emerge as one of the nation's most troubling hotspots. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)


© AMBER ARNOLD/AP
Nursing assistant Monica Brodsky, left, and nurse Taylor Mathisen work at a drive-thru testing site for COVID-19 in the parking lot at UW Health Administrative Office Building in Middleton, Wis., Monday, Oct. 5, 2020. A surge of coronavirus cases in Wisconsin and the Dakotas is forcing a scramble for hospital beds and raising political tensions, as the Upper Midwest and Plains emerge as one of the nation’s most troubling hotspots. (Amber Arnold/Wisconsin State Journal via AP)

On July 29, the US reported more than 71,300 infections, about two weeks after a peak daily case count of more than 77,000 cases. The country was then at the height of the pandemic and several states were adding thousands of new cases each day. By mid-September, the summer surge had slowed and the US was averaging a little more than 36,000 daily cases.

But now, the country is averaging more than 53,000 new infections daily — up 14% from the previous week. The case upticks have prompted state leaders to push new measures in hopes of curbing the spread of the virus.

Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts announced changes to the state’s health measures, including requiring hospitals to reserve at least 10% of staffed general and ICU beds for Covid-19 patients. New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham this week ordered new mass gathering limitations and a 10 p.m. closing time for establishments serving alcohol. And in Kentucky, Gov. Andy Beshear said earlier this month he instructed authorities to step up mask enforcement.

Hospitalizations are climbing nationwide. And they’ll likely be followed by a rise in daily Covid-19 deaths, says Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

“This is a good moment for people to stop and ask themselves, what can I do to try to be sure that we limit the further infections that otherwise seem to be looming in front of us as cold weather is kicking in and people are indoors, and those curves are going upward, in the wrong direction,” Collins said Friday.

Researchers from the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation project more than 2,300 Americans could be dying daily by mid-January and a total of more than 389,000 people could die from the virus in the US by February 1.

More than 218,000 people have already died nationwide since the start of the pandemic. Just over 8 million have been infected.

But it’s not too late to turn things around. Experts say Americans can help get the virus under control by heeding basic public health guidelines touted by officials for months: avoiding crowded settings, keeping a distance, keeping small gatherings outdoors and wearing a mask.

‘We are in a new wave of rising positivity in Covid-19 cases’

At least 31 states —