Tag: Cases

 

42 states, territories in upward trajectory of new COVID-19 cases: HHS memo

Only nine jurisdictions are improving. Just five jurisdictions are at a plateau.

Forty-two states and territories are in an upward trajectory of new COVID-19 cases, while only nine jurisdictions are improving, according to an internal Health and Human Services memo obtained by ABC News.

Just five jurisdictions are at a plateau.

There were 5,530 deaths recorded from Oct. 16 to Oct. 22, marking a 15.1% increase in new deaths compared with the previous week, according to the memo.

The national test-positivity rate increased from 5.1% to 5.9% in week-to-week comparisons.

Across the country, 24% of hospitals have more than 80% of their ICU beds filled. That number was 17 to 18% during the summertime peak.

In Florida, new cases are up 30% among high school students compared to two weeks ago, and up 42% among young adults ages 18 to 24, the memo said.

In Kentucky, new deaths have been increasing over the last two weeks. Kentucky reported its second-highest daily fatality count on Wednesday, the memo said.

The state is preparing its surge capacity as hospitalizations rise.

Mississippi reported a 26.2% increase in cases over the last week, according to HHS.

COVID-19 related hospitalizations in Mississippi are up 24% since last week, with COVID-19 ICU hospitalizations up 7%.

The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, who primarily live in Neshoba County, are disproportionately affected by the virus. The tribe reported 22 new cases this past week with

Daily Covid-19 cases will hit six digits soon, expert warns, as US reports one-day high of more than 83,000 infections

The US just marked a harrowing milestone: It recorded its highest one-day number of Covid-19 infections Friday at more than 83,000 — more than 6,000 higher than the country’s previous record set in July.



a person wearing a blue hat: An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston's Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
An RN hands off a coronavirus sample to medical assistant Bettie Cleveland at a COVID-19 testing site set up by Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center at Prince Hall Grand Lodge in Grove Hall in Boston’s Dorchester on Oct. 22, 2020. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

And as the fall surge continues, the daily numbers will get worse, experts warn.

“We easily will hit six-figure numbers in terms of the number of cases,” Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, told CNN Friday night. “And the deaths are going to go up precipitously in the next three to four weeks, following usually new cases by about two to three weeks.”

This comes as the country’s seven-day average of new daily cases surpassed 63,000 Friday — an 84% increase since the average started ticking back up in mid-September, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

Health officials say the steep inclines follow the reopening of schools and colleges across the US and have been largely driven by small gatherings — often family events — that are increasingly moving indoors, where the virus is likely to spread.

In Maryland, the governor said this week family gatherings were the No. 1 source of transmission in the state, followed by house parties. In North Carolina, health officials reported its highest daily case count Friday and said they continue to see clusters “from social and religious gatherings.”

Unlike many European countries that are also experiencing spikes, the US never lowered its daily case baseline very far, meaning the compounding of cases could be worse, experts say.

And that’s ahead of several popular holidays, when health officials worry more Americans could let their guard down and opt to visit family and friends and further drive surges.

In North Dakota, with the highest per capita new case rate in the country, Gov. Doug Burgum called for a “Thanksgiving challenge,” urging residents to follow mitigation guidance like masks and social distancing to bring numbers down by the holiday.

“It would be really great to be sharing with all of you at Thanksgiving that our numbers are going down as we head into the holiday period,” he said Friday. “That we’ve got increasing amounts of hospital capacity. That our schools have remained open, that our businesses are open during that holiday season.”

34 states report rise in cases

The President has said in recent days the country is rounding the corner when it comes to the pandemic. But alarming patterns across the country tell a different story.

At least 34 states reported more new Covid-19 cases in the last week than the week prior, according to Johns Hopkins data. In Georgia, health officials reported

U.S. breaks daily record for coronavirus cases with over 84,000 new infections

FILE PHOTO: Certified nursing assistant (CNA) Jermaine LeFlore prepares to take a patient’s nasal swab at a drive-thru testing site outside the Southside Health Center as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Bing Guan/File Photo

(Reuters) – The United States broke its daily record for new coronavirus infections on Friday as it reported 84,218 new cases due to outbreaks in virtually every part of the country, according to a Reuters tally.

The spike in cases comes less than two weeks before the presidential election on Nov. 3 and is hitting battleground states such as Ohio, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. On Thursday, the United States reported a near-record 76,195 new cases.

The previous record was 77,299 new cases on July 16. At the time, hospitalizations for COVID-19 patients hit 47,000 and two weeks later deaths rose to an average of 1,200 per day.

Now, hospitalizations are over 41,000 and deaths average nearly 800 per day. Sixteen states had record one-day increases in new cases on Friday and 11 reported a record number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Health experts have not pinpointed the reason for the rise but have long warned that colder temperatures driving people inside, fatigue with COVID-19 precautions and students returning to schools and colleges, could promote the spread of the virus.

The United States has the most cases in the world at 8.5 million and the most fatalities with 224,000 lives lost. The United States has reported over the past week an average of 60,000 new cases per day, the highest seven-day average since early August.

The Midwest has been the epicenter of the latest surge but infections are rising nationwide.

The Northeast reported an 83% increase in cases in the past month. New cases have doubled in Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and New Jersey in the past four weeks as compared to the prior four weeks, according to a Reuters analysis.

Western states including Montana, New Mexico and Wyoming have reported a 200% increase in cases in the past four weeks when compared with the previous four weeks.

Reporting by Anurag Maan in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker

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U.S. Breaks Daily Record for Coronavirus Cases With Over 84,000 New Infections | Top News

(Reuters) – The United States broke its daily record for new coronavirus infections on Friday as it reported 84,218 new cases due to outbreaks in virtually every part of the country, according to a Reuters tally.

The spike in cases comes less than two weeks before the presidential election on Nov. 3 and is hitting battleground states such as Ohio, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. On Thursday, the United States reported a near-record 76,195 new cases.

The previous record was 77,299 new cases on July 16. At the time, hospitalizations for COVID-19 patients hit 47,000 and two weeks later deaths rose to an average of 1,200 per day.

Now, hospitalizations are over 41,000 and deaths average nearly 800 per day. Sixteen states had record one-day increases in new cases on Friday and 11 reported a record number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Health experts have not pinpointed the reason for the rise but have long warned that colder temperatures driving people inside, fatigue with COVID-19 precautions and students returning to schools and colleges, could promote the spread of the virus.

The United States has the most cases in the world at 8.5 million and the most fatalities with 224,000 lives lost. The United States has reported over the past week an average of 60,000 new cases per day, the highest seven-day average since early August.

The Midwest has been the epicenter of the latest surge but infections are rising nationwide.

The Northeast reported an 83% increase in cases in the past month. New cases have doubled in Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and New Jersey in the past four weeks as compared to the prior four weeks, according to a Reuters analysis.

Western states including Montana, New Mexico and Wyoming have reported a 200% increase in cases in the past four weeks when compared with the previous four weeks.

(Reporting by Anurag Maan in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Alabama adds 3,852 COVID cases after influx of backlogged data dating back to June

Alabama added more than 3,800 COVID cases yesterday after a huge influx of backlogged data dating back to June.

The Alabama Department of Public Health showed a total of 180,916 coronavirus cases in the state, up 3,852 from the day before. Of that total, 973 were confirmed cases and 2,879 were probable. Of that 2,879, the 2,565 were antigen tests from a facility in Mobile that dated back to the summer.

The cases “will be classified as probable COVID-19 cases reported on 10/22/20 even though the tests were performed during June through Oct. 18. All laboratories are required by law to report all results (including positive and negative results) for (COVID-19) to ADPH,” the agency said in an announcement.

“Delays in reporting by required reporters is not within control of ADPH. Processing the backlog will not impact the ADPH COVID-19 Risk Indicator Dashboard,” ADPH added.

The state added 16 deaths to bring its total to 2,859.

ADPH reports 864 patients are currently hospitalized due to coronavirus.

Here are the latest county-by-county numbers from the Alabama Department of Public Health. The numbers include both confirmed and probable cases with the overnight increases shown in parenthesis:

Autauga – 2030 (+7)

Baldwin – 6615 (+140)

Barbour – 1012 (+15)

Bibb – 825 (+14)

Blount – 1911 (+13)

Bullock – 639 (+2)

Butler – 1002 (+1)

Calhoun – 4224 (+35)

Chambers – 1343 (+7)

Cherokee – 731 (+5)

Chilton – 1858 (+17)

Choctaw – 390 (+2)

Clarke – 1336 (+36)

Clay – 736 (+7)

Cleburne – 551 (+8)

Coffee – 1732 (+15)

Colbert – 1987 (+20)

Conecuh – 560 (+3)

Coosa – 203 (+1)

Covington – 1714 (+15)

Crenshaw – 603 (+1)

Cullman – 2399 (+42)

Dale – 1665 (+11)

Dallas – 1863 (+1)

DeKalb – 3360 (+58)

Elmore – 3173 (+24)

Escambia – 1722 (+3)

Etowah – 4214 (+27)

Fayette – 569 (+8)

Franklin – 2032 (+11)

Geneva – 861 (+9)

Greene – 342

Hale – 758 (+9)

Henry – 643 (+4)

Houston – 3717 (+25)

Jackson – 2125 (+25)

Jefferson – 22987 (+137)

Lamar – 474 (+8)

Lauderdale – 2180 (+32)

Lawrence – 837 (+16)

Lee – 6517 (+21)

Limestone – 2797 (+32)

Lowndes – 704 (+1)

Macon – 530 (+1)

Madison – 9228 (+78)

Marengo – 1002 (+10)

Marion – 1071 (+9)

Marshall – 4372 (+42)

Mobile – 16,788 (+2,320)

Monroe – 645 (+5)

Montgomery – 9978 (+103)

Morgan – 4071 (+35)

Perry – 585 (+2)

Pickens – 836 (+12)

Pike – 1327 (+4)

Randolph – 820 (+8)

Russell – 1928 (+5)

St. Clair – 2891 (+20)

Shelby – 7274 (+70)

Sumter – 472 (+2)

Talladega – 2636 (+25)

Tallapoosa – 1313 (+8)

Tuscaloosa – 10,235 (+87)

Walker – 2755 (+33)

Washington – 734 (+100)

Wilcox – 564 (+2)

Winston – 919 (+6)

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Montgomery County’s active COVID-19 cases pushes past 2,200

Online registration is still available for COVID-19 testing in Montgomery County. To get a voucher, go to mchd-tx.org or mcphd-tx.org and click on the

Online registration is still available for COVID-19 testing in Montgomery County. To get a voucher, go to mchd-tx.org or mcphd-tx.org and click on the “need to be tested” link. Fill out the information. A voucher will be emailed. Once you have the voucher, make an appointment at your choice of testing centers and get tested.

Jason Fochtman, Houston Chronicle / Staff photographer

Montgomery County added 66 new active COVID-19 cases Friday, bumping the county’s active total over 2,200.

Overall, the county logged 139 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the total to 13,575 with 2,206 active.

The reason for the difference in the new cases and active cases is the Montgomery County Public Health District is continuing to process cases that were reported to the Department of State Health Services directly by health care providers and entered into the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System.

As for total hospitalizations, both county and noncounty residents, decreased five to 56 with 14 of those patients in critical care beds.

The total number of COVID-19-related deaths remained at 147.

Online registration is still available for COVID-19 testing in Montgomery County.

To request a voucher, go to mchd-tx.org or mcphd-tx.org and click on the “need to be tested” link and fill out the information. A voucher will be emailed and once you have the voucher, make an appointment at a testing center.


Call the county’s COVID Call Center at 936-523-3916 for more information.

[email protected]

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U.S. breaks daily record for coronavirus cases with nearly 84,000 new infections

By Anurag Maan



FILE PHOTO: Drive-thru COVID-19 testing site on Milwaukee's Southside


© Reuters/BING GUAN
FILE PHOTO: Drive-thru COVID-19 testing site on Milwaukee’s Southside

(Reuters) – The United States broke its daily record for new coronavirus infections on Friday as it reported at least 83,948 new cases due to outbreaks in virtually every part of the country, according to a Reuters tally.

The spike in cases comes less than two weeks before the presidential election on Nov. 3 and is hitting battleground states such as Ohio, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. On Thursday, the United States reported a near-record 76,195 new cases.

The previous record was 77,299 new cases on July 16. At the time, hospitalizations for COVID-19 patients hit 47,000 and two weeks later deaths rose to an average of 1,200 per day.

Now, hospitalizations are over 41,000 and deaths average nearly 800 per day.

Health experts have not pinpointed the reason for the rise but have long warned that colder temperatures driving people inside, fatigue with COVID-19 precautions and students returning to schools and colleges, could promote the spread of the virus.

The United States has the most cases in the world at 8.5 million and the most fatalities with 224,000 lives lost. The United States has reported over the past week an average of 60,000 new cases per day, the highest seven-day average since early August.

The Midwest has been the epicenter of the latest surge but infections are rising nationwide.

The Northeast reported an 83% increase in cases in the past month. New cases have doubled in Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and New Jersey in the past four weeks as compared to the prior four weeks, according to a Reuters analysis.

Western states including Montana, New Mexico and Wyoming have reported a 200% increase in cases in the past four weeks when compared with the previous four weeks.

(Reporting by Anurag Maan in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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New cases reported Friday are second highest since the pandemic began



a person standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: After changing PPE, an LPN dons her face shield at an Aveanna Healthcare and Fallon Ambulance walk-up COVID-19 testing site during the continuing coronavirus pandemic in Lynn, MA on Oct. 19, 2020. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)


© Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
After changing PPE, an LPN dons her face shield at an Aveanna Healthcare and Fallon Ambulance walk-up COVID-19 testing site during the continuing coronavirus pandemic in Lynn, MA on Oct. 19, 2020. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

The number of new coronavirus cases across the United States surpassed 75,000 on Friday, not long after the US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams warned it could be the worst week since the pandemic began.

The daily case count on Friday hit 77,289, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. That’s the second-highest number of cases reported in a single day since the pandemic began. The highest day for new infections was on July 16 with 77,362 cases.

“This week, we will probably have our highest number of cases that we’ve ever had on a daily basis in the United States,” Adams said earlier on Friday at the Meridian Global Leadership Summit on Global Health Diplomacy.

Friday’s case tally continues the trend from Thursday when the US reported more than 70,000 new infections. Thirty-two states have been reporting rising Covid-19 infections and cases were holding steady in 17 more, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

Adams cautioned that hospitalizations are starting to go up in 75% of the jurisdictions across the country and officials are concerned that in a few weeks, deaths will also start to increase.

The good news, Adams said, is that the mortality rate in the country has decreased by about 85% thanks to multiple factors, including the use of remdesivir, steroids and better management of Covid-19 patients.

More than 41,000 people were hospitalized across the country, according to the Covid Tracking Project. This is the highest level of nationwide hospitalizations since Aug 20.

The number of people hospitalized has increased by 33% since the beginning of October, the CTP says.

Deaths are also creeping upward, with 856 on Thursday, Johns Hopkins says. The 7-day average of deaths continues to climb and is up to 763. That is the highest level of average weekly deaths in a month.

In White House coronavirus task force reports obtained by CNN this week, officials say there are “early signs of deterioration in the Sun Belt and continued deterioration in the Midwest and across the Northern States.” And more state leaders have sounded the alarm on increasing infections, hospitalizations and deaths.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, said Friday that he’s concerned about a massive surge in Covid-19 cases across the country and urged people to “double down” on measures to prevent the spread of the virus.

“The upticks on the map of more than 30 States that are having upticks is not going to spontaneously turn around unless we do something about it,” Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told CNN’s Erin Burnett.

Fauci has previously said he doesn’t think a federal mask mandate would work but on Friday he said

AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson to resume COVID-19 vaccine trials as U.S. daily cases top 71,000

On Friday, both AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson announced that their coronavirus vaccine trials are set to resume in the U.S. after hitting pause when volunteers became sick. The Food and Drug Administration gave the green light after investigations found no link between those cases and the vaccine.

The announcement comes as the U.S. recorded more than 71,000 coronavirus cases on Thursday, which is the highest single-day increase since July, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University. A total of 41 states are reporting an increase in average new cases, and 15 states have reported record hospitalizations in the last week.

“This really does become a moment where all Americans have to recognize that each of us individually has a responsibility if we want to turn this around,” said Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

In hot spot Wisconsin, new cases are up nearly 40% compared to two weeks ago. Wisconsin resident Ava Pennicuik, 15, is still suffering from hot flashes and extreme fatigue three months after recovering from COVID-19.

“I still feel sick sometimes. Some days are good and then some days aren’t,” said Pennicuik. “Like one day I’ll have a really bad day and also super dizzy and tired, and I’ll have to take a nap, and the other day, like, I can just do stuff, like, normally.”

The latest data from researchers at the University of Washington says wearing face masks in public could save nearly 130,000 lives in the U.S. this fall and winter.

Katelyn Evans, 16, became the first teen to get an injection as part Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine study at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, the Associated Press reported. It’s part of a push to safely inoculate school-age children.  

“I figured, you know, the more people they test, the more information they get and the sooner they can put out a vaccine to keep everyone safe,” said Evans.

Since the pandemic began, more than half a million American children have been infected with COVID-19. While vaccine trials continue to move forward, the first shots are unlikely to be recommended for kids. Vaccines can’t be given to children unless they’ve been tested in their age group, the AP reported.

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ASU Campus Coronavirus Cases Are Declining

TEMPE, AZ — Arizona State University is seeing a decline in active coronavirus cases across its campuses, even as the state sees an increase.

As of Thursday, the Tempe-based university reported 11 known positive cases among its faculty and staff, and 80 among its student population. The last update reported 13 additional student cases. The university has nearly 75,000 enrolled students.

The bulk of the cases came from off-campus students living in metro Phoenix, the university said. Just 19 are currently in isolation on the Tempe campus.

“Currently, there are no students in isolation on either the ASU Downtown Phoenix, ASU West or Polytechnic campuses,” the university said in its update.

ASU offers free tests for anyone who wants one, and has also implemented random, required testing since Aug. 27 for students both on and off-campus, and for the school’s employees. Since the start of the fall semester, ASU has conducted 94,931 coronavirus tests.

While ASU is seeing its cases fall, Arizona is seeing them rise.

As of Friday, the state reported 975 new cases and six deaths from the virus. While hospitalizations and ventilator use remains low, the number of tests returning positive is increasing. It was 5.5 percent last week, up from 3.9 percent just a few weeks ago.

Approximately 235,882 confirmed cases and 5,865 deaths have occurred in Arizona since the start of the pandemic.

In her Thursday blog post, Dr. Cara Christ, Director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, encouraged Arizonans not to let down their guard as the pandemic drags on.

“The increased cases and percent positivity show that COVID-19 is still actively circulating and highlights the need for Arizonans to continue taking the important prevention steps they have been following over the past few months: wearing a mask when out in public, staying physically distanced from people who are not in your household, washing your hands frequently, avoiding large gatherings, and staying home when sick,” she wrote.

This article originally appeared on the Tempe Patch

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