Tag: Business

 

The Latest: France Ponders New Restrictions as Cases Soar | Business News

PARIS — France’s government is holding emergency virus meetings Tuesday and warning of possible new lockdowns, as hospitals fill up with new COVID patients and doctors plead for backup.

President Emmanuel Macron is convening top ministers and Prime Minister Jean Castex is meeting with lawmakers, unions and business lobbies as the government weighs its next steps in the fight against surging infections. Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin told France-Inter radio that “we should expect difficult decisions.”

Among possible new measures for the hardest-hit areas are lengthening existing curfews, full confinement on weekends or all week, and closing non-essential businesses.

Doctors describe growing pressure on emergency services and intensive care wards, where COVID patients now take up 54% of beds nationwide.

France is now reporting more than 350 new cases per 100,000 people each week, and nearly 18% of its widespread tests are now coming back positive. It has reported Europe’s third-highest virus death toll, at more than 35,000 lives lost.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— The coronavirus is getting worse in states that Trump needs to win the most

— U.S. sees coronavirus deaths rising, just like the experts predicted

— European nations enact sweeping restrictions like curfews to try to slow surging infection rates

— In a year marked by fear and death, Americans wrestle with celebrating a holiday hinged on turning fear and death into fun

— World Series is being played at a neutral site in front of smallest crowds in a century, but Dodgers and Rays are just happy that some fans are there

— Follow AP’s coronavirus pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

MOSCOW — Russian authorities on Tuesday have issued a nationwide mask requirement amid a rapid resurgence of the coronavirus outbreak.

Health authorities registered 16,550 new cases and 320 new deaths on Tuesday, the highest daily death toll since the beginning of the pandemic.

Russia’s public health agency, Rospotrebnadzor, ordered all Russians to wear masks in crowded public spaces, on public transport, in taxis, at parking lots and in elevators starting on Wednesday. The agency also recommended regional authorities put a curfew on entertainment events, cafes, restaurants and bars from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Russia has the world’s fourth largest tally of over 1.5 million confirmed coronavirus cases. The government’s coronavirus task force has been reporting over over 15,000 new infections every day since last Sunday, which is much higher than in the spring.

Russia has reported more than 26,000 virus-related deaths.

Despite the sharp spike in daily new infections, Russian authorities have repeatedly dismissed the idea of imposing a second national lockdown or shutting down businesses. Most virus-related restrictions were lifted during the summer.

BRUSSELS — Former Belgian Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes remained hospitalized in intensive care with COVID-19 but her condition is improving, her spokeswoman said Tuesday.

In a message to The Associated Press, Elke Pattyn said Wilmes “is getting better every day” although she will stay in intensive care

LA Approves More Business Reopenings, Plans for Testing Expansion

LOS ANGELES, CA — As Los Angeles launches a rapid coronavirus testing program, the county approved more business reopenings Friday and continued to report high numbers of new cases — the result of a testing backlog that lead to days of underreporting.

In upcoming weeks, Los Angeles officials hope to have a new weapon in the region’s testing arsonal. Officials hope the use of widespread tests will lead to safer reopenings.

Los Angeles County announced 2,773 new COVID-19 cases Friday, along with 23 more deaths.

The county had reported unusually low daily case numbers earlier this week due to the unspecified technical problems. The issues began to resolve Thursday, when the county announced 3,600 new cases, the largest number since a surge that occurred after the Fourth of July holiday. County officials noted that about 2,000 of the cases reported Thursday were a result of the backlog.

Authorities warned residents to expect more backlogged test results to cause higher numbers of new cases reported in upcoming days.

The 2,773 cases announced by the county, along with 84 reported by Long Beach health officials and 25 by Pasadena, lifted the countywide cumulative total from throughout the pandemic to 296,930.The county also announced 23 coronavirus-related deaths on Friday, raising the death toll to 6,974.

A total of 769 people were hospitalized in the county due to the virus as of Friday, down from 777 on Thursday but up from 758 on Wednesday, 730 on Tuesday, 722 on Monday and 752 on Sunday. Hospitalizations have remained below the 800 mark for several weeks, following post-July Fourth surges that saw more than 2,000 daily hospital cases.

The county on Friday also confirmed two new cases of a rare, coronavirus-related pediatric condition, known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. The two new cases lifted the countywide total to 43, all of whom required hospitalization and half of whom were admitted to intensive care units. There have not been any deaths in the county due to MIS-C.

Two months after Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced a coordinated effort to establish wide-scale use of rapid, at-home COVID-19 tests, local health officials are poised to announce details of a pilot program next week that will employ an FDA-approved test and assess the feasibility of its widespread use.

“There’s a lot of work that goes into developing plans and implementing these sorts of studies, and we are very excited about the partnership with the city of L.A. and USC that we have made considerable progress over the last two months,” Dr. Paul Simon, chief science officer for the county Department of Public Health, told reporters in an online briefing Thursday.

“We will be having a press event next week to share an update on where we’re at and hope to begin implementing at least the first phase of these studies very quickly,” he said.

Garcetti announced in August a collaboration with nationwide medical experts, bioscience firms and government leaders in an effort to develop rapid, low-cost

Dr. Contessa Has New Business Inspired By Her Mastectomy

Show Highlight

Dr. Contessa Metcalfe Decides to Undergo a Double Mastectomy

bravo Insider Exclusive!

Create a free profile to get unlimited access to exclusive videos, sweepstakes, and more!

Sign Up for Free to View

Dr. Contessa Metcalfe has a whole new business up her sleeve! The Married to Medicine cast member is already a doctor, real estate entrepreneur, and restaurant owner, but she has recently added another venture to her resume. On an episode of Sister Circle TV, she opened up about her latest business, and how it has been inspired by her own experiences as a patient. 

“It’s about public health and preventive medicine. Last year, that mastectomy really changed my whole view of medicine. And one thing I learned, that I already knew, is that doctors are not magicians. There’s no magic pill that I can give you,” she explained. “But I can help you understand how to take control of your own health, things that you can do yourself.” 

“So, integrative medicine, nutrition, how to take care of you,” she continued. When you come in, you just gotta let me know what’s happening, and we can manage so you can get back to taking care of you again. We don’t get to learn how to do that.”

Contessa opened up about her decision to undergo a double mastectomy during Season 6 of Married to Medicine, noting her family history of breast cancer. 

“I have had abnormal mammograms for at least 10 years. And my mom died from breast cancer, and I want to do whatever it takes to make sure that that same thing doesn’t happen to me,” she said in the clip above. “I had two sick parents growing up. Almost weekly in doctors offices, and hospitals and clinics. My family seems to be cursed. I feel like my whole life has been preparing for the moment that I’m going to get sick, too.”

Related Stories

Related Show

The Daily Dish is your source for all things Bravo, from behind-the-scenes scoop to breaking news, exclusive interviews, photos, original videos, and, oh, so much more. Subscribe to The Daily Dish podcast, join our Facebook group, and follow us on Instagram for the latest news hot off the presses. Sign up to become a Bravo Insider and be the first to get exclusive extras.

 

Source Article

New Elkhorn fitness business mixes Pilates with treadmills | Articles

Omaha’s newest fitness studio has something to offer for all fitness levels, its owners said.

The Sculpt Studio, which mixes Pilates-style workouts with treadmill workouts, opened in late August in Elkhorn.

Owners Sarah Marshall and Emily Burg at teamed up to bring the concept to Omaha. The metro area already is home to several cycling studios, Marshall said.

“We wanted to bring something new and different,” she said.

Classes at Sculpt are high intensity and low-impact. They’re suitable for gymgoers of all fitness levels. Some clients have used the classes as complements to their existing fitness routines, Marshall said.

In one class, gymgoers use Mega former machines, which are similar to traditional Pilates machines. Participants work a muscle group until those muscles are fatigued before moving onto another group.

In another class, participants spend half the time on the Megaformers and half the time on Woodway Curve treadmills. The treadmills, which are curved on the bottom, are nonmotorized, so users control the speed by running or walking on them.

Classes are limited to 11 participants in the 2,000-squarefoot studio. Each class is 50 minutes.

Machines are spaced out in the studio, and they’re wiped off regularly. Gymgoers are required to wear masks until they reach their designated machine for class. Class times are spaced out to avoid clients overlapping as they come and go.

Source Article

Business mandates mount as New Mexico deals with virus surge

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham on Tuesday unveiled more requirements for businesses after a string of record-breaking daily case counts prompted renewed restrictions just last week.

Starting Friday, restaurants, breweries, retail stores, gyms and other businesses will be required to close for two weeks if they have more than four separate incidents of COVID-19 among employees within a 14-day period. Those businesses that have had at least two outbreaks will be listed on the state’s new watch list.

Restaurants that want to continue offering limited indoor dining must also complete specific training and keep a log of customers for at least three weeks. Retail stores must close by 10 p.m., and state-operated museums and historical sites will be closed until further notice.

Lujan Grisham said the restrictions are not meant to punish businesses but rather curb what has become one of the highest rates of spread in the U.S. New Mexico on Tuesday reported an additional 599 cases, bringing the total to nearly 37,900 since the pandemic began. Another seven deaths were reported, and hospitalizations have increased nearly 90% over the last two weeks.

“We don’t have much time,” the governor said during a briefing. “If we don’t attack and snuff out the virus right now by working collectively with businesses and each other, then the virus will win and it leaves us very little opportunity to save lives and to keep our health systems from being overrun.”

Despite having some of the strictest rules in the country, Lujan Grisham’s administration has been struggling in recent weeks with a surge in cases and increases in transmission and positivity rates. The governor said she believes the exponential increase is the result of people letting their guard down and not taking precautions.


The Republican Party of New Mexico called the latest requirements another attack on businesses, saying the Democratic governor’s policies during the pandemic have led to a collapsed economy, tens of thousands of job losses and hundreds of permanently shuttered restaurants.

“Locking down New Mexico more is not the answer,” party chairman Steve Pearce said, suggesting that the governor’s rules were arbitrary.

Under the state’s rapid response program, officials responded to more than 830 businesses during the past week. That marked a six-fold increase over the last month. Businesses on the watch list range from hospitals and medical marijuana operations to law firms, car dealerships, grocery stores and gas stations.

Sandia National Laboratories is among them. The state’s Occupational Health and Safety Bureau has opened an investigation of the lab after receiving a complaint about alleged violations of the state public health order.

A letter sent Monday by the bureau and obtained by The Associated Press alleges that Sandia failed to comply with the health order by not limiting operations to remote work to the greatest extent practicable to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The state claims employees were ordered to cease telework and report to work in-person.

The state is requiring the lab to inform

Business News | Stock and Share Market News


By

‘The impact of work’: On-the-job coronavirus exposure a key driver in Black, Latino communities | Business News

Because it was a nice afternoon in March, Katrina Llorens Joseph and her husband Albert decided to sit outside for lunch at the Subway restaurant not far from City Park.

Afterward, she went back to her desk at the VA Hospital, and he got behind the wheel of a city bus.

“He dropped me off at work and then he went on to work,” she said.

As routine as the lunch was, it now seems like a fateful one to Joseph, 52. The couple had been very careful about isolating. She believes her husband, 53, came in contact with the virus that day at an emergency meeting with a bunch of other bus drivers. Within a few weeks, 1 in 8 Regional Transit Authority employees would test positive in a COVID-19 outbreak that led to the deaths of three workers.

Antonio Travis is 27 years old and the picture of health.

Days after that lunch, Albert Joseph left work early, suffering from fevers, chills and a high fever.

His wife snapped into action. “I figured he had the virus,” she said.

Katrina Joseph moved to the guest room. She began wearing a mask in the house, pulled out new toothbrushes for everyone, wiped down doorknobs, washed her hands and served food on paper plates.

Even so, the whole family became infected. For the next few weeks, the couple and their daughter, Danielle, 19, were all bedridden in separate rooms of their house in Chalmette. They spiked 104-degree fevers. Sometimes, they collapsed on the way to the bathroom. On four separate occasions, when fingertip monitors indicated dangerously low oxygen levels, they called 911, though the ambulances twice left empty.



NO.deepdivide3.adv.007.jpg

Albert Joseph, a bus driver for RTA, poses in his home in Chalmette, La., Saturday, Sept. 5, 2020. The Joseph family suffered coronavirus at the same time.




Once, paramedics took an oxygen-deficient Albert Joseph to the hospital for a four-hour stay. The second time, they carried out a very weak Katrina Joseph. She spent eight days in Ochsner Health Center in St. Bernard Parish, “lying there, knowing that I had this disease that was killing people all around me.”

The Josephs’ story is hardly unusual. But leading researchers say their experience and others like it offer a window into why the coronavirus has hit Black communities particularly hard across the nation. Many frontline workers who continued to work through the pandemic were exposed on the job and brought the virus home to infect entire households.

Workplace spread a driver

Within Louisiana, Blacks have accounted for nearly half of all COVID-19 deaths to date, despite making up a little less than a third of state residents. The biggest reason for the coronavirus’ cruel toll in Black communities seems to be its outsized infection rate there: when compared with White Louisiana residents, Black Louisianans have been three times as likely to contract the virus.



101120 Racialized Pandemic Work Risks

A new, much-discussed study concluded that the disproportionate spread in the Black community originates in