Tag: Breaks

 

Giroir breaks with Trump, says surge in coronavirus cases ‘not just a function of testing’

In fact, the U.S. tallied a single-day record of more than 83,000 new Covid-19 cases on Friday, a new high-water mark as coronavirus has roared back across the country. Public health experts have warned that the fall and winter months will be an especially bleak period for Americans, as the coronavirus converges with the annual flu season.

But at a campaign rally in Michigan on Tuesday, Trump argued that the reason the U.S. has “so many cases” is “because we test more,” adding that “in many ways, I hate” testing.

“We test everybody, and because of that — now, if I tested half, if I said, ‘We are going to cut our testing down in half,’ they’d go crazy because the cases would go down in approximately half, right?” Trump told supporters.

Trump’s remarks come as he has sought to promote misleadingly positive assessments of the pandemic in the final days of the presidential race, returning to his false assertions that the U.S. is “rounding the turn” in its fight against the coronavirus.

Reports emerged over the weekend of another White House coronavirus outbreak among Vice President Mike Pence’s staff, and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows on Sunday seemingly acknowledged that the administration had given up on its efforts to contain the spread of Covid-19. “We’re not going to control the pandemic,” Meadows said.

Giroir disputed that message on Wednesday, saying that although the U.S. was at a “critical point” in its pandemic response, “we can control the virus” through mitigation measures including mask-wearing, hand-washing and avoiding crowded indoor spaces.

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Chrissy Teigen Breaks Her Silence Following the Tragic Loss of Her Baby Boy

Earlier this month, Chrissy Teigen and her husband, John Legend, shared the devastating news that they’d lost their baby boy, Jack, at around 20 weeks due to complications with his placenta. Throughout her pregnancy Chrissy had been posting regular updates online, detailing the complications she was unfortunately facing.



Chrissy Teigen posing for the camera: Chrissy Teigen has broken her silence following the tragic loss of her baby boy, Jack, in a new moving blog post. She addresses those who questioned her photos


© Daniele Venturelli – Getty Images
Chrissy Teigen has broken her silence following the tragic loss of her baby boy, Jack, in a new moving blog post. She addresses those who questioned her photos

When Jack tragically passed, the brave couple also chose to share their grief with the world alongside a series of intimate photos, taken while in hospital. Baby loss awareness charity, Tommy’s, said this can be an important part of the grieving process for parents (in response to trolls leaving cruel messages on Chrissy’s social media accounts). Following that, Chrissy has been relatively quiet online, bar telling fans she and John are ‘quiet but okay’.

Now, the model, cookbook author and presenter has spoken in greater depth about what she’s been going through in a moving blog post. It begins with her thanking everybody for their kind words during this intensely difficult time, and for sharing their own stories too. She adds that notes beginning with ‘You don’t have to respond to this’ were helpful, as she felt quite overwhelmed (but appreciative) of the support.



graphical user interface, text, application: Chrissy's Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy


Chrissy’s Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy

Speaking about the moment she was told by doctors that her third child would not survive to full term, Chrissy wrote on Medium: ‘After a couple nights at the hospital, my doctor told me exactly what I knew was coming — it was time to say goodbye. He [Jack] just wouldn’t survive this, and if it went on any longer, I might not either. We had tried bags and bags of blood transfusions, every single one going right through me like we hadn’t done anything at all. Late one night, I was told it would be time to let go in the morning.’

Addressing the people who (bafflingly) went out of their way to write nasty messages underneath her personal photos, Chrissy said that John was reluctant to capture their pain at first, but that she knew she ‘needed to know of this moment forever, the same way I needed to remember us kissing at the end of the aisle, the same way I needed to remember our tears of joy after Luna and Miles. And I absolutely knew I needed to share this story.’



a close up of a person talking on a cell phone: Chrissy's Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy


© Chrissy Teigen – Instagram
Chrissy’s Brave Blog about Losing Her Baby Boy

Showing an amazing amount of strength, she added, ‘I cannot express how little I care that you hate the photos. How little I care that it’s something you wouldn’t have done. I lived it, I chose to do it, and more than anything, these photos aren’t for anyone but the people who have lived this or are curious enough to wonder what something like this is like.

Illinois Health Official Breaks Down Crying While Giving Update on State’s Rising COVID-19 Deaths

Gov. JB Pritzker/Twitter

The Illinois Director of the Department of Public Health broke down in tears during Friday afternoon’s press briefing on the coronavirus in the state.

While updating the public on the state’s rising numbers of COVID-19 deaths, Dr. Ngozi Ezike took a moment to herself, turning away from the podium as she was unable to hold back her tears.

“Since yesterday we have lost an additional 31 lives, for a total of 9,418 deaths. These are people who started with us in 2020 and who won’t be with us at the Thanksgiving table,” she said. “Today, we are reporting 3,874 new cases, for a total of 364,033 confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic.”

“Excuse me, please,” Ezike said as she paused to compose herself before someone brought over a box of tissues. “I’m sorry.”

Gov. JB Pritzker/Twitter Dr. Ezike

RELATED: U.S. Breaks Record for Most COVID Cases in a Single Day with More Than 75,000 New Infections

As of Saturday, an additional 286 people have died, bringing the total to 9,704, according to a New York Times database.

During her speech, Ezike told Illinois residents that she understands “the mental, social and the emotional toll that this pandemic continues to have on people.”

“Not just because I’m asking people, it’s because I’m feeling it and living it myself. I don’t get to live in some COVID-free bubble, exempt from all the pain and tragedy of this pandemic. So I understand how pandemic fatigue is striking everyone. It’s real,” she said.

“The way we work, the way we live, the way we play has changed, and the harsh reality is that the sacrifices we’ve made, that we continue to make do not have a future expiration date,” Ezike added. “And I know that that’s difficult.”

Illinois has been experiencing a rising number of COVID-19 cases, reporting an average of 4,131 cases per day, an 81 percent increase from the average two weeks ago. As of Saturday, there have been at least 370,134 confirmed cases since the start of the pandemic.

“My message to you is to stay strong,” Ezike said. “I have never run a marathon but I have the utmost regard for those who have been able to train and plan and finish a marathon. But this is a difficult race when you can’t actually see the endpoint and I’m sorry that that’s the message I have for you. Nevertheless, I’m asking you to fight the fatigue. Fight the urge to give up on social distancing.”

Ezike added that residents need to continue wearing a mask, maybe reconsider attending large gatherings and continue to opt for virtual hang-outs.

RELATED: ‘Long Hauler’ COVID Patients Still Have Symptoms Months Later — and Most Are Women and the Elderly

“This is what we will have to do to bring the spread down in our community… Let’s please work together. I know many of you are healthy and don’t have a concern in the world of dying from

U.S. breaks daily record for coronavirus cases with over 84,000 new infections

FILE PHOTO: Certified nursing assistant (CNA) Jermaine LeFlore prepares to take a patient’s nasal swab at a drive-thru testing site outside the Southside Health Center as the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak continues in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S., October 21, 2020. REUTERS/Bing Guan/File Photo

(Reuters) – The United States broke its daily record for new coronavirus infections on Friday as it reported 84,218 new cases due to outbreaks in virtually every part of the country, according to a Reuters tally.

The spike in cases comes less than two weeks before the presidential election on Nov. 3 and is hitting battleground states such as Ohio, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. On Thursday, the United States reported a near-record 76,195 new cases.

The previous record was 77,299 new cases on July 16. At the time, hospitalizations for COVID-19 patients hit 47,000 and two weeks later deaths rose to an average of 1,200 per day.

Now, hospitalizations are over 41,000 and deaths average nearly 800 per day. Sixteen states had record one-day increases in new cases on Friday and 11 reported a record number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Health experts have not pinpointed the reason for the rise but have long warned that colder temperatures driving people inside, fatigue with COVID-19 precautions and students returning to schools and colleges, could promote the spread of the virus.

The United States has the most cases in the world at 8.5 million and the most fatalities with 224,000 lives lost. The United States has reported over the past week an average of 60,000 new cases per day, the highest seven-day average since early August.

The Midwest has been the epicenter of the latest surge but infections are rising nationwide.

The Northeast reported an 83% increase in cases in the past month. New cases have doubled in Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and New Jersey in the past four weeks as compared to the prior four weeks, according to a Reuters analysis.

Western states including Montana, New Mexico and Wyoming have reported a 200% increase in cases in the past four weeks when compared with the previous four weeks.

Reporting by Anurag Maan in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker

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Wisconsin breaks Covid-19 records as hospitals brace for flu season

MADISON, Wis. – Inside UW Health, the Covid-19 units keep growing — and the stress is rising.

“The people we’re seeing in here are very sick,” nurse Katie Lanoway said. “They are lonely. They are dealing with this alone and it’s becoming increasingly harder for us to try to manage, and playing all these different roles: playing the nurse, playing the support person. It’s very difficult.”

NBC News received a rare tour of one of thee units, which had previously reached its capacity of 28 beds. It’s currently down to about 20 patients. At first, the unit stretched just one hallway. Now, it’s four.

Image: Dr Gavinski (NBC News)
Image: Dr Gavinski (NBC News)

On Friday, Wisconsin reported a seven-day rolling average of its positivity rate: 22.7 percent. (That’s the percentage of tests that come back positive.) The same rate in New York is currently barely above 1 percent — and even that’s considered risky.

Wisconsin also set several records: most cases in a seven-day period (24,292)l the highest average cases per day (3,470) and the highest average coronavirus-related deaths per day (24).

Almost all of the state’s 72 counties now have what public health officials say is a “very high” level of the virus.

“It’s terrifying,” said Dr. Katie Gavinski, who started working at UW Health in Madison this summer. “I’m very scared that if this doesn’t stop soon, we’re going to end up with a much bigger problem come winter and flu season.”

The shifts are taking their toll.

“It’s devastating to see someone struggling to breathe,” Gavinski said. “You can see the fear in their eyes. You can see how scared they are.”

UW Health has had months to prepare, putting it in a better position than most. It has adequate personal protective equipment and it has the space to be able to rearrange Covid-19 wards. But if the flu season creates another surge of patients, staffing could be a challenge.

Dr. Jeff Pothof is UW Health’s chief quality officer and an emergency medicine physician.

“What I can’t do by the snap of my fingers is create critical care nurses, create critical care physicians and bring their expertise to the bedside,” he said.

Just across town, the Big Ten conference is set to kick off its college football season Friday night. There will be no fans in the stadium, no tailgating allowed and police plan to enforce rules banning outdoor gatherings of more than 25 people.

Image: UW Hospital Madison (NBC News)
Image: UW Hospital Madison (NBC News)

But health care workers have an urgent warning for those who don’t plan to take the virus seriously and will congregate anyway.

“The Badger game this evening does worry us,” Pothof said. “We have a very healthy culture of celebrating the Badgers, tailgating, parties — and if that happens this year, with how much Covid is in our communities, it is certain to cause a super-spreader event. … We need to celebrate the Badgers, but we need to do it differently.”

Compared to the beginning of the pandemic,

U.S. Breaks Daily Record for Coronavirus Cases With Over 84,000 New Infections | Top News

(Reuters) – The United States broke its daily record for new coronavirus infections on Friday as it reported 84,218 new cases due to outbreaks in virtually every part of the country, according to a Reuters tally.

The spike in cases comes less than two weeks before the presidential election on Nov. 3 and is hitting battleground states such as Ohio, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. On Thursday, the United States reported a near-record 76,195 new cases.

The previous record was 77,299 new cases on July 16. At the time, hospitalizations for COVID-19 patients hit 47,000 and two weeks later deaths rose to an average of 1,200 per day.

Now, hospitalizations are over 41,000 and deaths average nearly 800 per day. Sixteen states had record one-day increases in new cases on Friday and 11 reported a record number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Health experts have not pinpointed the reason for the rise but have long warned that colder temperatures driving people inside, fatigue with COVID-19 precautions and students returning to schools and colleges, could promote the spread of the virus.

The United States has the most cases in the world at 8.5 million and the most fatalities with 224,000 lives lost. The United States has reported over the past week an average of 60,000 new cases per day, the highest seven-day average since early August.

The Midwest has been the epicenter of the latest surge but infections are rising nationwide.

The Northeast reported an 83% increase in cases in the past month. New cases have doubled in Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and New Jersey in the past four weeks as compared to the prior four weeks, according to a Reuters analysis.

Western states including Montana, New Mexico and Wyoming have reported a 200% increase in cases in the past four weeks when compared with the previous four weeks.

(Reporting by Anurag Maan in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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U.S. breaks daily record for coronavirus cases with nearly 84,000 new infections

By Anurag Maan



FILE PHOTO: Drive-thru COVID-19 testing site on Milwaukee's Southside


© Reuters/BING GUAN
FILE PHOTO: Drive-thru COVID-19 testing site on Milwaukee’s Southside

(Reuters) – The United States broke its daily record for new coronavirus infections on Friday as it reported at least 83,948 new cases due to outbreaks in virtually every part of the country, according to a Reuters tally.

The spike in cases comes less than two weeks before the presidential election on Nov. 3 and is hitting battleground states such as Ohio, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. On Thursday, the United States reported a near-record 76,195 new cases.

The previous record was 77,299 new cases on July 16. At the time, hospitalizations for COVID-19 patients hit 47,000 and two weeks later deaths rose to an average of 1,200 per day.

Now, hospitalizations are over 41,000 and deaths average nearly 800 per day.

Health experts have not pinpointed the reason for the rise but have long warned that colder temperatures driving people inside, fatigue with COVID-19 precautions and students returning to schools and colleges, could promote the spread of the virus.

The United States has the most cases in the world at 8.5 million and the most fatalities with 224,000 lives lost. The United States has reported over the past week an average of 60,000 new cases per day, the highest seven-day average since early August.

The Midwest has been the epicenter of the latest surge but infections are rising nationwide.

The Northeast reported an 83% increase in cases in the past month. New cases have doubled in Connecticut, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and New Jersey in the past four weeks as compared to the prior four weeks, according to a Reuters analysis.

Western states including Montana, New Mexico and Wyoming have reported a 200% increase in cases in the past four weeks when compared with the previous four weeks.

(Reporting by Anurag Maan in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

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Alberta breaks single-day record for cases as Premier Jason Kenney enters isolation

FILE - This June 9, 2015 file photo shows then-Canadian Defence Minister Jason Kenney in Warsaw, Poland. He is now the premier of Alberta. Alberta is investing $1.1 billion in the disputed Keystone XL pipeline, a project that Kenney says is crucial for the province's economy. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)
FILE – This June 9, 2015 file photo shows then-Canadian Defence Minister Jason Kenney in Warsaw, Poland. He is now the premier of Alberta. Alberta is investing $1.1 billion in the disputed Keystone XL pipeline, a project that Kenney says is crucial for the province’s economy. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

For more on today’s top stories and the spread of the novel coronavirus across the country, please refer to our live updates below throughout the day, as well as our COVID-19 news hub.

Alberta premier isolating after cabinet minister tests positive

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney is isolating after municipal affairs minister Tracy Allard tested positive for COVID-19. The premier is not known to have any COVID-19 symptoms at this point.

Transport minister Ric McIver and multiple MLAs are also considered close contacts to this case.

This comes as the province reports a significant increase in daily cases, hitting 406 on Wednesday, breaking the single-day record in Alberta. There are now 3,372 active cases in the province, with the majority of cases in the Edmonton zone.

Three more deaths were reported in the province, two in Edmonton and one in Calgary.

Ontario premier defends bill that would provide liability protection for long-term care homes

At a press conference on Wednesday, Ontario Premier Doug Ford was pushed to answer questions about a new bill that was introduced Tuesday, which would provide liability protection to some workers, businesses and non-profits against COVID-19-related lawsuits.

When asked about long-term care homes, and families of residents in these facilities being able to hold these institutions accountable for their actions (particularly after the number of deaths due to COVID-19 infections), Ford reinforced that the bill would not prevent individuals from suing long-term care homes for “gross negligence.”

“This does not protect the long-term care homes, 100 per cent by any means,” the premier said, adding that he specifically asked about that fact yesterday.

A statement from Donna Duncan, CEO of the Ontario Long Term Care Association, released Tuesday, supports the proposed legislation.

“Long-term care homes care for more than 79,000 residents across Ontario and they deserve quality healthcare and safe accommodations,” the statement reads. “Liability protection is a necessary measure to stabilize and renew Ontario’s entire long-term care sector.”

“Without it, many insurance companies will cease coverage, as they have already begun to do, putting homes across the province at risk and jeopardizing their expansion and renewal.”

Meanwhile, on Tuesday Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath slammed the bill and its impact on families of seniors in long-term care, who are victims of poor care and management.

“Today, the Ford government tabled a bill obviously designed to shield itself and for-profit long-term care corporations from accountability,” Horwath’s statement reads. “More than 1,900 people have died in long-term care during this pandemic, shattering thousands of families.”

“Doug Ford didn’t protect them — but is now protecting the very companies that let them die in horrible conditions. I’m appalled at this move to deny families the justice, accountability

Row Breaks Out Over WHO Trial Casting Doubt on Remdesivir as COVID-19 Drug | Top News

By John Miller and Stephanie Nebehay

ZURICH/GENEVA (Reuters) – A row broke out on Friday over a World Health Organization (WHO) clinical trial which concluded that the anti-viral drug remdesivir has little or no impact on a patient’s chances of surviving COVID-19.

Gilead Sciences Inc., the U.S. company that developed the drug, said the findings appeared inconsistent with evidence from other studies validating the clinical benefit of remdesivir, which was used to treat U.S. President Donald Trump’s coronavirus infection.

“We are concerned the data from this open-label global trial has not undergone the rigorous review required to allow for constructive scientific discussion,” Gilead said.

But Richard Peto, an independent statistician hired by the WHO to scrutinize the results of its Solidarity trial, dismissed Gilead’s criticism.

“It’s a reliable result, don’t let anybody tell you otherwise, because they’ll try to,” Peto told reporters. “This is real world evidence.”

The results of the trial, announced by the WHO on Thursday, dealt a blow to one of the few drugs being used to treat people with COVID-19.

The U.N. health agency said remdesivir appeared to have little or no effect on keeping people alive or on the length of hospital stays among patients with the respiratory disease.

Its trial was conducted on 11,266 adult patients in over 30 countries and its findings may shift the focus of treatments away from antivirals such as remdesivir to new monoclonal antibodies which the WHO has said could be added to its studies.

In addition to remdesivir, Trump received Regeneron’s experimental monoclonal antibody infection. But another U.S. company, Eli Lilly and Co, said on Tuesday a trial of its own COVID-19 antibody treatment had been paused over safety concerns.

Gilead, which quickly repurposed what it had developed as an Ebola drug when the COVID-19 pandemic began, said that other, smaller remdesivir trials showed the treatment cut COVID-19 recovery time by five days and helped reduce the risk of death in some patients who were getting oxygen.

Peto, an Oxford University professor emeritus, said the smaller trial’s perceived benefit in keeping people alive could have been mere “chance”.

“And you’ve got to randomise in large numbers,” Peto said. “There isn’t sufficient emphasis based on the need for large numbers if you want really reliable results.”

For the remdesivir arm of the WHO’s Solidarity trial, 2,743 patients were given remdesivir, compared to 2,708 in the control group. Gilead’s study had 1,062 participants.

“The real disappointment is that remdesivir has also failed in a larger number of cases and in the ‘real world setting’,” Clemens Wendtner, Chief Physician of Infectiology and Tropical Medicine at Munich’s Schwabing Clinic, said.

“A major clinical breakthrough looks different and warns us that the battle against COVID-19 is far from won.”

The WHO’s trial also found that other medicines repurposed since the pandemic began — malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, anti-HIV drug combination lopinavir/ritonavir and interferon — offered little or no benefit to COVID-19 patients.

The hydroxychloroquine and anti-HIV studies were abandoned earlier this year, and interferon