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Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn't Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images / Doucefleur
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn't Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images/iStockphoto
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit

Every morning before I sit down to work, I fill up a large mason jar with ice water. And after I finish the liquid (and give myself a pat on the back), I go to town chomping on the ice. I realize that the sound of ice on teeth might make some cringe, but it’s never bothered me – I’ve always figured that I’m just consuming more water.

Much to my surprise, though, my dentist probably wouldn’t be too thrilled about my ice chewing habit.

“When I’m asked to name a food that has a high potential to cause trouble, I call out chewing ice as an issue,” Dr. Matt Messina, DDS, an ADA spokesperson, says. “Ice is a crystal and tooth enamel is a crystal. When you push two crystals against each other, one will break.”

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The somewhat good news is that Dr. Messina says that most of the time, the thing that breaks is the ice – however, sometimes it can be a tooth or a filling. “And that’s a self-inflicted injury,” Dr. Messina adds.

Along with unpopped popcorn kernels, Dr. Messina says ice is the most common culprit for broken teeth. “However, most of the time, a broken tooth or filling was in the process of failing and whatever you were eating was just the last straw.” Basically, you’re taking a risk.

Not going to lie – for me, that pile of ice on the bottom of my mason jar isn’t so appetizing anymore. Looks like I’ll be letting it melt, or leaving it out entirely, from now on.

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Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images / Doucefleur
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit



a hand holding a glass of wine: Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit


© Getty Images/iStockphoto
Your Dentist Probably Doesn’t Approve of Your Ice Chewing Habit

Every morning before I sit down to work, I fill up a large mason jar with ice water. And after I finish the liquid (and give myself a pat on the back), I go to town chomping on the ice. I realize that the sound of ice on teeth might make some cringe, but it’s never bothered me – I’ve always figured that I’m just consuming more water.

Much to my surprise, though, my dentist probably wouldn’t be too thrilled about my ice chewing habit.

“When I’m asked to name a food that has a high potential to cause trouble, I call out chewing ice as an issue,” Dr. Matt Messina, DDS, an ADA spokesperson, says. “Ice is a crystal and tooth enamel is a crystal. When you push two crystals against each other, one will break.”

The somewhat good news is that Dr. Messina says that most of the time, the thing that breaks is the ice – however, sometimes it can be a tooth or a filling. “And that’s a self-inflicted injury,” Dr. Messina adds.

Along with unpopped popcorn kernels, Dr. Messina says ice is the most common culprit for broken teeth. “However, most of the time, a broken tooth or filling was in the process of failing and whatever you were eating was just the last straw.” Basically, you’re taking a risk.

Not going to lie – for me, that pile of ice on the bottom of my mason jar isn’t so appetizing anymore. Looks like I’ll be letting it melt, or leaving it out entirely, from now on.

Click here for more health and wellness stories, tips, and news.

Continue Reading

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EU medicine agency could approve COVID-19 vaccines early next year – report

FILE PHOTO: The headquarters of the European Medicines Agency (EMA), is seen in London, Britain, April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

MILAN (Reuters) – The European Medicines Agency could approve three COVID-19 vaccines early next year, its Executive Director Guido Rasi said on Friday, according to a report by Italian news agency ANSA.

“If everything goes well, in the first months of 2021, there could be three vaccines approved by EMA. But everything has to go well. There’s a little hitch behind every corner,” the agency quoted Rasi as telling Sky TG24 news in an interview.

It would be very difficult, if not impossible, to have any vaccine ready for use this year, Rasi was quoted as saying, adding first shots for people at higher risk for severe illness could be available by the spring.

EMA is reviewing candidate vaccines by drug makers Pfizer, AstraZeneca and Moderna under a real-time release process, in a bid to speed up the approval if trials of any of those vaccines are successful.

Real-time reviews could speed up the approval process by allowing researchers to submit findings in real time, without waiting for studies to conclude.

The arrival of the vaccine would only be “the beginning of the end of the pandemic, not the end,” the official warned.

He added that measures like social distancing and the use of protective masks will remain necessary as it will take at least six months to understand whether the vaccine is effective in reducing the spread of the virus.

Reporting by Elvira Pollina, editing by James Mackenzie and Elaine Hardcastle

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